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Hi all I’m new to the forum and would like to share my experience and I hope successful conclusion sorry it a bit long winded but hope it helps, in brief loads of warning lights caused by simple failed abs sensor easy but long fix.

A few weeks ago my l&k 4x4 2014 Diesel yeti Low 25k miles started showing first an engine management light (mot coming soon of course !) poor connection on glow plug solved.
then the steering warning light followed by moving (cornering )light fault then abs then esc then tyre pressure then the optical parking system was not available, all lights were yellow not red , My friendly mechanic put his computer on it and it spat up this range of faults We cleared them only for them to come back a few miles down the road.

it rang alarm bells of costly fixes to come

some initial research on this forum suggested may be a battery a little low and now a few years old, we speculated that the amount of stuff having to start up on modern cars was causing an initial low power problem that triggered the computer to turn On the lights in yellow mode ( importantly though i did not test the esc the abs still worked under hard breaking the lights moved when the wheel was turned and the steering was still powered despite fault warning lights

battery was replaced and the lights went out then came on again until i drove down the road and then disappeared only to come back again as I got home ☹
So probably not the battery, though 12 months earlier I had had the boot open and radio on for an hour while loading and then driving 15 miles to the job where it then refuse to start at the end of the day leaving me stuck in a field overnight till I charged the battery, but I never really got to the bottom of that one and had no further starting probs Even in the cold...since!

Further research on the forum lead me to suspect the ABS sensor we changed front left, wiped all the codes with friendly mechanics computer and hey presto no more warning lights 🙂🥳

We have come to the conclusion that all the systems are sort of linked failing abs the computer thinks all the other systems are failing too, I dread to think how much i would have been charged by main dealer and what would have been changed to achieve the result.
Though why an abs sensor should fail on a 6 yr old low mileage car is any ones guess..

so much stuff on modern cars to go wrong and so few people out there that can possibly know all the problems but thanks to Jon my friendly mechanic and the forum a positive result hope it helps some one else

iain
 

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When you look at the inputs to any system controller (mini computer) it's revealing and surprising how many different inputs there are via the can-bus wiring. This, to a large extent, explains the cascade of fault codes that can be generated by even a single failing component, such as your ABS sensor.

The skill required then is the ability to find what is common to all the fault codes and then test the likely culprits. Mechanic? Nope, for modern cars you need a computer and a Sherlock.
 

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Welcome Wood Carver to this excellent forum.
Some one will be along soon and help you to add detail in your signature line and any other aspects appertaining to this forum.

I use it much as a drunk uses a lamp-post, more for support than illumination!
 
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I have had a similar experience to you. Driving home one night, the dash lit up like Blackpool illuminations with every conceivable warning light illuminated. The car went into limp mode and I had a slow and embarrassing 40 mile drive home.

On checking the fault codes, I found about 15 faults, all intermittent, for everything from ABS, to steering to one foglight etc. I reset them all and on a second scan only the ABS sensor on one wheel came up as a temporary fault. The ABS light on the dash wasn’t lit.
I reset that again and that was it, problem gone.

After several months and quite a few miles, I ran a scan again the other day - all clear!

My theory is (and I may well be wrong) that if these sensors or the canbus wiring suffers a momentary blip, through a magnetic pulse, momentary bit of dirt on ABS sensor,or whatever, the ECU logs that as a temporary, but at that stage it is not important enough for a warning light. When a large number of these temporaries are logged, the ECU finally says, “that’s it, lights and limp mode time!”

As I say, this is just my theory but I’d be interested if anyone has a more definitive answer.
 

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Hi Woodcarver, welcome to the forum. That is probably one of the best first posts we have ever had. I took the liberty of adding your car basics to your signature line.
 

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Hi Iain and welcome to the Forum.

As above - great first post, thanks (y)
I'm still searching for a friendly mechanic though... :giggle:
 

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Exactly my issue (x2).
Six orange lights. On motorway, so more than a tad alarming.
AA reviewed fault codes and advised primary cause ABS Sensor failure NSR and other lights cascade from it, although they may be false warnings. Advised safe to drive, a few miles later lights went out, then next day, came back on, then off.
Dealership had car for a day and took NSR off, checked and cleaned everything re sensor, including tracking back wiring under rear carpet in case of cross wiring and it was actually OSR problem. It wasn't.
Four hundred miles and two months later, 6 lights suddenly on again. SWMBO photographed dashboard evidence
(M4 60mph). Over next two days, lights off, on and then remained off.
Back in dealership again, showed images, codes analysed, again primary cause NSR ABS sensor.
Dealer's technical specialist (electrics) advised that there was a further SKODA ABS testing protocol to follow in order to determine whether SKODA UK would accept sensor replacement under warranty claim. Test confirmed replacement OK under warranty. Provisional booking made and new sensor ordered.

(Intermittent warnings an issue (1) to confirm driving safety (2) if ABS light was showing at next MOT - genuine fault or just a gremlin - car would fail test)
 

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Suffering from brain fade again - for temporary, substitute intermittent in #4. Thanks for switching my lights back on, Bexhillian. 😀. Now corrected.
 

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The skill required then is the ability to find what is common to all the fault codes and then test the likely culprits. Mechanic? Nope, for modern cars you need a computer and a Sherlock.
So true :)

That’s why “Auto Electrician” has become increasingly in demand as a trade. Rather than “mechanic”. In our very small town alone, there are ten or a dozen “garages” doing servicing, regular mechanical and body repairs. Counting 5 of those as franchised dealerships. Two specialist tyre fitting outlets. Plus, crucially, three specialist auto electrical and diagnostic shops. More often hidden away in a rather anonymous industrial unit somewhere.

Many branded dealerships will, when they say “leave it with us for a day”, often secretly whip your car off to the auto electrician’s place for a proper diagnosis. Before returning to the dealer premises for a fix.

Last stats I read, something like 60-70% of all AA/RAC/Green Flag call outs, were for electrical faults. With over half the remainder down to the combination of either puncture or mis-fuelling. Only a tiny proportion “mechanical” faults.
 

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Welcome to the forum Iain :)
 
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