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I have bled the Yeti in no particular order and my motorcycle (that states in the manual it needs to be on the Harley Davidson computer to bleed the Brembo ABS brakes) with no problem at all with just me and SWMBO.
 
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I've never run the ABS pump when bleeding the brakes. The brakes still work with the engine off and the pump not running so it follows that the fluid must still have a clear path to each calipers.

I've used the 2 person method, the EaziBleed method, the put-a-clear-plastic-hose-on-the-bleed-nipple-and-submerge-the-end-in-a-jar-of-brake-fluid method and the gravity method. All work.

The gravity method is the laziest way to do it. Fill brake reservoir, open a bleed nipple and wait until the fluid flows in a steady, clear stream.

I too start at the wheel furthest from the master cylinder but I've never been convinced that it makes any difference, and often do two 'circuits' of the bleed points.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Hi AJ,
You can flush the brake fluid using the traditional two-person method. With one in the wheel arch calling “down, up, down, up”, while locking and unlocking each bleed nipple in turn.
However, any car with ABS (which now means almost anything modern), it is far more effective to use a pressure system.

Garages tend to use a vacuum system that pulls fluid from the wheel caliper end. For the last 30+ years though I’ve used a Gunson’s Ezebleed kit. That pushes fluid from the reservoir end under pressure. Now on my second after the plastic parts on my old one got opaque and brittle with age. Around £22-23 from Screwfix.

That makes the job FAR easier and quicker, as well as more effective with ABS. Less risk of spillage too, as the top up into the car’s reservoir is via a sealed pipe from a container included with the kit that holds up to half a litre of fresh fluid. More than enough to flush an entire car. All under the pressure from a spare wheel (any odd wheel will do but has be at a max of 10psi during the process). Makes the whole thing a one man job that can be controlled 100% from the bleed nipple.

As to which order? Yup - like yourself, I always used to believe the principle of “start farthest from the reservoir and end closest”, to be the mantra to follow? If you consider the Yeti owners manual was originally written for LHD, then that is the order it actually suggests. Like a lot of things though, it appears to be an area that was not converted in the English translation?

I’m not convinced it makes any difference at at all on modern ABS systems though? And have bled and flushed many systems over the last 10 years, starting from whichever corner I happened to be working from first when changing pads. Such as the fronts. With 100% success. Sometimes even when the rears got flushed several days after the fronts.

Perfectly happy to hear what others have to say mind, on any of the above? Cue: Bryetian, Urrell, Logiclee, MarkTDi, et al?
Many Thanks Flintstone, I have invested in a gunson bleeding kit, £19.99 from screwfix and a litre of Dot 4 fluid. Hopefully no spills this time!
Cheers
AJ
 

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Yeti S+ 2010 2.0TDi CR110 2WD Manual
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Although an Ezibleed will work at 10 psi I tend to use 5psi as when I used 10 it leaked around the Ezibleed seals.
Yeah - at the 10psi upper limit you can get fluid fairly shooting out of the bleed nipple at a reasonable rate of knots. Good for pushing any trapped air bubbles out though, as it means they don't have time to get stuck!

The other aspect is that the Ezibleed tends to leave the car's reservoir brim full. I find it helps when finished the flush, to lift a few cc's out with the plastic vet's syringe and pipe. To take the final level back down to the reservoir's "max" mark.

I'm sure the dealer systems use a computer to force the ABS system to cycle every permutation electronically - to ensure every possible pathway through the ABS valve network is exercised during the process. I've never had a problem with air getting trapped in the ABS valve block though. Even when I've had the valve block dismantled and off the car, to poke a sticking valve back to life mechanically.
 

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With the level in the reservoir, I found that if I lowered it a bit at first the Ezibleed didn't fill it to the top as it normally does. Someone on here used a turkey baster to remove fluid form the reservoir, I used to use an ear dropper but it took forever and now use a redundant battery hydrometer after having removed the float and giving it a good clean internally.

Quite a few mechanics bleed the car with a vacuum, but I would have thought it could draw in air from around the bleed nipple thread.
 

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I've always used the old two person up down method.
Although I have used the brake system to reverse flush/bleed the clutch on an 05 Touran 6 speed manual, by linking a pipe from the front brake bleed nipple to the clutch slave nipple as it's almost imposable to bleed with the old method.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Although an Ezibleed will work at 10 psi I tend to use 5psi as when I used 10 it leaked around the Ezibleed seals.
Hi Everyone, just to update you on my brake bleeding escapade today. Having read all your comments and advise (Thanks) Thought I was all prepared this morning to the yeti and also Mrs J smart car... didn't work out that way. Here's what happened.
!) Prepared Gusson bleeding kit, checked the correct size top for brake reservoir. Used old plastic milk carton for old fluid with correct sized hold in top. Used spare tyre, down to 10psi.
2) Jacked up rear both wheels off..On accessing the bleed nipple I discovered that I needed an 11mm spanner which despite having around 40 spanners in the box...not one 11mm...Yuck!
3)Access to the nipple on the rears is very tricky, used a 11mm socket with extension to open slightly then a 7/16 open end spanner with the pipe fitted.
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4) Put system under pressure from tyre.
5) Opened rear R nipple to drain reservoir to minimum level, then toped up with new fluid (as instructions).
6) Fluid flowing but slight leeks at nipple and reservoir cap.
7) The nipple on the other side was very stiff indeed but eventually got it to open. Had to release pressure to top up new fluid container.

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8) fluid leeks at both nipples so had to wash with soapy water and toothbrush.
9) Access to the front nipples very easy only took a few minutes.

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Conclusion-
1) Successful in renewing fluid by oneself but not sure if it's any better than using the two man method.
2) However much I tried I seemed to get brake fluid everywhere, it's a really messy job

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3) However now it's done I don't need to worry about it for another two years.
4) One annoying problem is that you can't see the fluid level in the reservoir without opening the top to be sure.

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This much fluid came out. (plus a little more from the reservoir)

Had a drive this afternoon. The travel on the footbrake doesn't feel any different (should it?) but other than that I'm happy with the job.
Many thanks again for all your advise, great little site.

Cheers
AJ
 

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The brake pedal shouldn't feel any different unless there was air in the system.

The reasoning behind renewing brake fluid is because it is hygroscopic ... it absorbs water over time.
This water will eventually corrode parts of your hydraulic system internally, hastening the necessity to replace them.
It will also lower the boiling point of the fluid, which is bad news if your brakes ever get really hot.

The absorption of water is also why you should only ever use brake fluid from a sealed container, not a half-full one that has been in your garage for the last umpteen years!

I see you've been working on your Jenga technique ... today's arrangement looks more stable than last week's!!
 

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Ahh the happy days of brake fluid fountains from using an Eezibleed on the Minis...

Not sure if it was down to the quality of the threads of the reservoir on the master or the Eezibleed itself, but it was always a high risk operation, somewhere between Buckaroo and Danger UXB. Sandbags, buckets of water and rags on standby in case someone should cause some mechanical movement or vibration around the garage...

In more recent times, I have made life much less stressful with a pneumatic vacuum bleeder hooked to the compressor.


5781

Spag.
 
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