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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all having purchased a non raised floor yeti no jack with it.
wife purchased the polystyrene boxes for in the back but need to track down some clips to fit them.
I also need to cut some ply to cover the full sized alloy that will be going in there.
But I digress…
Back to main Question… any one recommend alternative jack to carry in the boot to jack up for wheel changes etc?
a more stable scissor the straight up jobbies?
1 ton rated?
want something secure especially if wife need to change it.
all help appreciated.
Thank you all.
 

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Scissor jack is OE. Personally this is what I would use. but don't buy an aftermarket one. Go to your local scrappy and find an unused genuine VAG one.
Hydraulic bottle jack is easiest for SWMBO to use. BUT the lifting point is very small and will do untold damage if incorrectly placed, also foot of jack very small. would need a square of 5ply to stand it on.
 
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Not quite an answer, but I was looking for jacking points and what could be the best option. Having swapped the brake discs, I recall lifting surfaces weren't very obvious.

 

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Scissor jack is OE. Personally this is what I would use. but don't buy an aftermarket one. Go to your local scrappy and find an unused genuine VAG one.
Hydraulic bottle jack is easiest for SWMBO to use. BUT the lifting point is very small and will do untold damage if incorrectly placed, also foot of jack very small. would need a square of 5ply to stand it on.
On bottle jacks, totally agree with Colin Lambert points. However do be very careful with the closed height of the bottle jack. Remember that if you have a flat, the height from the ground to the jacking point will be even less than normal. I went through this exercise a while back and couldn’t find a bottle jack that was short enough. I had to resort to using a scissor jack.
 

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However do be very careful with the closed height of the bottle jack.
One way around that problem is to drive the flat tyre onto the spare wheel. The jack will then fit.
This isn't perfect as you have to jack the car higher to release the spare wheel and doing so may introduce stability issues.

A light weight aluminium trolley jack would do the job nicely; but it's a little impractical to carry that around just in case.
On a practical level there's not much to beat the OEM jack in the compromise between size, weight, operation and risk.
 
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On a practical level there's not much to beat the OEM jack in the compromise between size, weight, operation and risk.
I agree with Bryetian, but I also carry an 8" x 6" x 3/4" piece of plywood to stand the jack on in case the road surface is not hard.

Additionally I carry one of these, which facilitates both replacement of the wheel and lining-up of the studs. It's probably the best £7 I've ever spent and makes the whole wheel-changing operation much easier and safer:

Spot On Alloy car wheel screw in quick alignment tool M14 x 1.5 Thread : Amazon.co.uk: Automotive

Other automotive suppliers are available ;)

Oh - and welcome to the Forum, James.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you all so much, looks like tracking down a used jack then, as I’ve seen the official jack up at over £80.
not much more to buy the kit with the tool bag ,carpet and towing eye.
really like the idea of the alignment tool great idea always a faff getting the wheel balanced and alighted to get the first bolt in.
think that’s on the shopping list.
would any Vag jack work or is the yeti one that bit taller?
thank you all again for warm welcome and swift replies,
appreciated.
 

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A “used” oem jack from a breaker’s yard is highly unlikely to have had very much actual use at all. Many may even be unused in fact. Despite being several years old.

Biggest advantage is one of those will come with the slotted “cup” that fits positively onto the downward vertical flange of the sill. So providing a very positive location at the lift point, that is far less likely to slip in any direction. Unlike bottle or other jacks where the lifting pad presents a flat surface to the sill.

Echo what others have said about also carrying a load spreader to place under the jack on softer or even gravel surfaces. I carry a piece of timber 6”x6”x2”, that was a surplus off cut from building the walls for raised beds in the garden.

Try to avoid the diamond shaped universal scissor jack types. Those tend to be even less stable than a small bottle jack.
 
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It should do.If your scrappy is friendly enough you could measure bottom of cill to ground and then wind up the jack in their shop to make sure it's tall enough. Don't forget the suspension drops as you lift so take that extra bit into account. my 'scrappy' jack and space save came from a Touran and lifts my Karoq ok. but double check as above before parting with your ££.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Appreciate the swift reply this one was online so unable to check height etc will try some local searches.
thanks again.
 

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HI James,

The Touran jack looks wrong for the Yeti see this -


Amazon have what they say is a Yeti jack here, it looks a bit diferent from mine so I'll let other members have a say whether it is suitable -

 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Appreciated JOHNLnK,
sent off about 12 messages on flea bay to breakers, one automated response there out of office November.
one this morning already gone.
will see if any return with good news by end of day.
 

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Yeti S+ 2010 2.0TDi CFHA 110 2WD Manual
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That Touran jack shown by JohnL&K looks very similar indeed to the jack that came with the factory fit spare wheel kit in our Yeti. Sorry to disagree on this, but I feel I must. Single foot. Most importantly a wide lift cup that slots over a 4-5cm length of the vertical, downward facing sill flange. The bits coloured blue in the diagrams. Together with a wide based foot, this makes the jack remarkably stable in use. (For a temporary jack that is). Provided you position the foot directly under the lift point. As shown in the diagram. This type of jack is quite heavy and robust in construction.

The red scissor jack pictured, from Amazon, I would not recommend. That is a universal type, fits any car. Yes, that also has a slot in the lift pad, but is that slot wide enough to fit over the Yeti’s chunky sill flange? The lift pad itself is quite narrow. Cheap, lightweight jacks of that design are notoriously unstable in use. The gear teeth that keep the two halves of each upper scissor section in-sync with each other, have a reputation (deserved from personal experience) of coming unlatched from each other under load. Leading to sudden collapse. Moreover the narrow lift pad makes them less stable to any sideways thrust (along the length of the vehicle). Not recommended.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks again, most wreckers I messaged on fleabay state already gone.
Had one comeback with £40 posted stating never used, pinch of salt with that.
 

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stating never used, pinch of salt with that.
In my experience, jacks that have been in a car are rarely used, if ever, these days. Not uncommon to find 10 or even 20 year old cars where the jack and spare wheel are obviously unused.

Most motorists these days wouldn't entertain changing a wheel themselves. They would rather call someone and have them do it. And that person is likely to bring and use their own jack.

Even if a jack has been used a few times, what's the issue?
It's not like they wear out easily.
 

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Agreed. Neither of my Yetis ever had the Jack used on them as I never had a need to.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Yeah I suppose valid points, however in contra to that I have always used the in car jacks loads on every car, rotating wheels taking wheels off for cleaning etc. Even having two big trolley jacks and an ancient Land Rover huge bottle jack, despite being at home the ease of the in car jack for just wheel off saves a lot of faffing.
have also seen jacks that have clearly gone over in the past but still in the cars.
what do think to price of jack at £40.
Reasonable? I’m a yorkshire man , so if they pay me to take it even bette….. rare anyone has ever taken me up on that offer mind.
as ever thank you all for your replies.
 

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what do think to price of jack at £40.
Personally I'd rather have a small trolley jack and an ice hockey puck or block of wood for that money. Winding the screw-type jacks in and out isn't compatible with my low annoyance threshold.
But each to their own.

As has been mentioned previously, if you do end up buying a VW group jack that is not from a Yeti, make sure it is compatible with the Yeti sill seam and that it goes high enough to lift a Yeti wheel off the ground.

I haven't checked if all Yeti jacks are the same. The Greenline version has a lower ride height, and they might have used a shorter jack to save a few cents.
That is just a theory but it's the type of thing VW might do, so worth checking.
 

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Hi,
I may be able to help you with a yeti jack. A while ago I bought a spare wheel which had the polystyrene insert inside complete with jack and tools. I put my original jack some where in my shed.
Will have a look later on today.
 
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