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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey folks, this is my first post as a new yeti owner. So I picked up Totoro (my yeti) about two weeks back and Ive been finding that the steering seemed unresponsive, there's a ton of road noise and every bump in the road is making every journey a disappointment. Ive read a few threads about changing the alloy size down to 16''s and changing the tyres too but decided to check what the tyre pressure was first on my way home from work today.
I'm used to having a tyre psi of 31 front and 30 rear (225/45/R17)on my previous car (Audi A3 ) so I was a bit shocked to find that the psi was 49 (on 225/55/R17) all round on Totoro and figured that this must be reason for all the discomfort I'm finding when driving, so I lowered the psi to 32 all round and headed off home and can honestly say it's made a massive difference but am wondering now is 32 psi too low and should it be around the 35 mark?
 

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Hi Robbiehpm and welcome to this very excellent forum. As I understand it the correct tyre pressure is displayed on the inside of the plate/flap over the fuel intake. I have 17" Michelin CrossClimate and found them to be much "softer" than the P7's, and are set at 35psi (I think).
For the future, it would be very useful to know more about model/year.spec of your Yeti in your "signature" line, plus location too.
 

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Hi Robbiephm and welcome to the forum. Your tyres were probably over-inflated by the dealer to prevent the tyres 'flatting' whilst stored prior to sale. It happened to our first Yeti and I think that as it's common practice, it should have been picked-up on the PDI. I used to fit cross-climate tyres for winter on 16" rims for our Yeti and the ride definitely improved.
 

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Welcome to the forum Robbiehpm :)

Think Ruari and Jimmy have identified your issue of over inflated tyres by the dealer so see how the ride feels with then set to the right pressure before thinking about 16 inch rims. Should be 30 to 32 psi (2 to 2.2 bar) depending on the load you normally carry.
 

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Hi Robbiehpm and welcome to the Forum.

I was similarly disappointed with the ride quality of my new Yeti upon collection. I discovered my dealer had not reduced the tyre pressures from 'storage' (>40psi) to 'normal' (31/32psi) during PDI. Correcting the tyre pressures made all the difference!
 

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Ditto here the factory puts abut 50psi in to protect the tyres in transit & possible storage for several months, and my dealer forgot to lower them before I collected it. it was like driving a car with no springs on the 30 mile trip home.
 
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In addition to correct pressures, the handbook recommends putting the best tyres on the front but members are split on that advice. And inflating with nitrogen, can anyone recommend it? Welcome to the forum.
 

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Hi Robbiephm and welcome to the forum. Your tyres were probably over-inflated by the dealer to prevent the tyres 'flatting' whilst stored prior to sale. It happened to our first Yeti and I think that as it's common practice, it should have been picked-up on the PDI. I used to fit cross-climate tyres for winter on 16" rims for our Yeti and the ride definitely improved.
Welcome to the forum Robbie.
49psi is FAR too high.
I bought Jimmy's 16" 215 60 Alutec alloys, ex his Yeti for my Karoq Sportline which was running 19" 225 40!! Dreadful ride and constant curbing. The ride now is far better and no curbing.
If you are still unhappy now you have yours at the correct pressure, I can recommend going 16" 60 aspect. (but if you do.... Don't forget to tell your insurance company}.
Good luck.
 
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I do swap wheels front to back on the same side, once the fronts are about 70% worn, so that they should all wear out at the same time. This is painful at replacement due to doubling the cost but at least you can then have all 4 tyres of the same make and spec, which I think is important. It also gives a good point to consider wether all season replacements instead would suit.
Can't see any point in filling with nitrogen, and what happens when they need topping up?
 
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In addition to correct pressures, the handbook recommends putting the best tyres on the front but members are split on that advice. And inflating with nitrogen, can anyone recommend it? Welcome to the forum.
Best Tyres on front?
  • The theory that the “best” (most tread) tyres should go, on the rear, as put about in recent years by some tyre fitting shops, is based purely on the idea that the inexperienced driver can’t control oversteer (when the rear of the car tends to slide out under cornering, taking a wider line than the fronts). And that oversteer induces panic in such drivers. Whereas understeer (front wheels sliding wide, or straight on), encourages the driver to back off the speed. Which is thought to be “safer”? Therefore, so the theory goes, having the tyres on the rear with the most tread means those are less likely to lose grip and start sliding in very wet, standing water conditions.
  • That theory totally ignores the physics that in a straight line, the front tyres clear a path through standing water for the rears (Unless you’re driving a 3-wheeler, or Citroen DS or CX) So tyres with the least tread on the front are more likely to aquaplane in those conditions. An aqua planing tyre losing all steering or braking control anyway. So even when cornering a tyre with little tread on the front is more likely to aquaplane and lose all control.
  • Personally, I’ve never had a problem with oversteer. (Except when I had a rear drive Ford Escort with a standard ratio steering rack, when it couldn’t wind off the opposite lock fast enough as the rear end came back through neutral). Especially on a front drive car, where the front wheels do all the driving, 95% of the steering and 80% of the braking. I’d rather keep control of the fronts in lower grip conditions, thanks. And keep the steering control to handle the rear end doing whatever it wants.
  • Hence I prefer to keep the most tread tyres on the front, at the bi-annual swap round. As recommended by Skoda in the handbook.
Nitrogen fill?
  • as Graham said, air is already 78%N.
  • The theory as explained to me was that the N2 molecules are larger than O2 (really???) so don't leak out through the rubber so easily. So in that theory, the tyre holds pressure better? Mmmm.
  • I tried it once, when ATS were offering it as a cheap deal.
  • Made no discernible difference to anything. Handling, holding pressure over time, etc.
  • Nails and leakage around the rim from a poor fitting have a far greater impact on loss of pressure that Oxygen molecules filtering out through the rubber.
  • So my conclusion is, like Graham and ken3966 - “waste of effort”.
 

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In addition to the comments above regarding nitrogen, if you were to pay for it, what would you do when you need to top your tyre pressure up? A friend at work had nitrogen in his tyres and had a leaky valve, when I saw him using a foot pump I asked where he had got a nitrogen foot pump from, then the penny dropped.
 

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When I bought four cross climate tyres for our Roomster, the manager at the local tyre fitters told me that they were only needed on the front and this is what they did for their van. When I insisted, he said ok, if that's what you want. Unbelievable! Incidentally, Goodyear cross-climate tyres are directional, so check the arrow on the sidewall 'just in case'.
 

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Personally, I’ve never had a problem with oversteer. (Except when I had a rear drive Ford Escort with a standard ratio steering rack, when it couldn’t wind off the opposite lock fast enough as the rear end came back through neutral).

I remember the Ford Capri I had for a couple of years, very tail happy. Just after I changed it to a FWD car I was following another Capri up the A1 when it suddenly started spinning on the laying snow and went backwards off the road. My car went past with no issues at all.
 

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I think pure nitrogen in the tyres gives a more linear correlation for change of pressure with temperature. This is important - - - if you are driving an F1 car.
 
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I remember the Ford Capri I had for a couple of years, very tail happy.
I tried driving my Rover SD1 VDP on snow, just the once. The steering wheel might as well have been disconnected for all the effect it had.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Good evening folks and thank you all for the warm welcomes. I didn't expect to get so many positive response's so quickly. I live in a rural area with bendy, bumpy country roads but travel to the city daily for work and although we're going on a lock down for 6weeks this won't effect me as I'm an essential worker and the load I carry which is 15st 😅
For as much as I know about cars it was definitely a newbie mistake not checking the fuel hatch recommendations on tyre pressures 🙈 my yeti is a 2014 2.0 with very low mileage (no fancy name on it) bought private from a lad (definitely not a car guy mind) who originally got it from a dealership, so i guess he thought 49psi was the norm, i just hope that it hasn't had a negative effect on any of the suspension parts ie cv joints, drop links, top shock mounts, wheel hub bearings ect ect. The tyres are Goodyear (efficient grip) on the front and Zeeteck (which I've never heard of) on the rear and they're 225/50/R17 W98 not what I previously wrote with 225/55/R17. The front tyres look at about 60% whereas the rear are at 90%. So i think il be swapping them around. The 16's are something i have been thinking about through reading the forums but for now I'm only spending a €1 to play around with tyre pressure over €600-€800 for new alloys and tyres but when the time comes for 16s il be appreciative of everyone's opinions on fitment details and tyre sizes for them.
 
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