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Good evening folks and thank you all for the warm welcomes. I didn't expect to get so many positive response's so quickly. I live in a rural area with bendy, bumpy country roads but travel to the city daily for work and although we're going on a lock down for 6weeks this won't effect me as I'm an essential worker and the load I carry is 15st 😅
For as much as I know about cars it was definitely a newbie mistake not checking the fuel hatch recommendations on tyre pressures 🙈 my yeti is a 2014 2.0 with very low mileage (no fancy name on it) bought private from a lad (definitely not a car guy mind) who originally got it from a dealership, so i guess he thought 49psi was the norm, i just hope that it hasn't had a negative effect on any of the suspension parts ie cv joints, drop links, top shock mounts, wheel hub bearings ect ect. The tyres are Goodyear (efficient grip) on the front and Zeeteck (which I've never heard of) on the rear and they're 225/50/R17 W98 not what I previously wrote with 225/55/R17. The front tyres look at about 60% whereas the rear are at 90%. So i think il be swapping them around. The 16's are something i have been thinking about through reading the forums but for now I'm only spending a €1 to play around with tyre pressure over €600-€800 for new alloys and tyres but when the time comes for 16s il be appreciative of everyone's opinions on fitment details and tyre sizes for them.
Never heard of Zeetex Tyres but they don't get brilliant reports.
Personally I'd be ditching them quite quickly.

Overinflating is unlikely to have damaged anything other than the wear rate for the tyre. The Yeti is very rugged as I proved many times.
 

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When you get the 16 inch wheels you need 215/60/16. I have a second set of wheels for my 16's, I bought them on eBay and they came off an Audi and were £80. I gave the tyres away and fitted some Michelin Alpins. eBay has a buyer collects option for heavy items, such things tend to get a lower price hence four wheels for just £80
 

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Never heard of Zeetex Tyres but they don't get brilliant reports.
Personally I'd be ditching them quite quickly.
That could be prophetically ironic Graham? I suspect their alternative name could possibly be “Ditchfinders”?
 

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That could be prophetically ironic Graham? I suspect their alternative name could possibly be “Ditchfinders”?
Knew you would get that one Henry
 
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Discussion Starter · #25 · (Edited)
When you get the 16 inch wheels you need 215/60/16. I have a second set of wheels for my 16's, I bought them on eBay and they came off an Audi and were £80. I gave the tyres away and fitted some Michelin Alpins. eBay has a buyer collects option for heavy items, such things tend to get a lower price hence four wheels for just £80
What fitment should I be looking for on 16" alloys? And how does the bore size work out? On my previous car, when changing from 16's (bore size 57.1) up to 17s (bore size 66.something) sprigets are needed to account for the loss of space between the wheel hub and bore diameter of the alloy but if I'm downgrading from 17s to 16's?
 

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I would have to look that up rather than guessing, but they are the same as the Yeti wheels, right down to the size of the centre boss.
 

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What fitment should I be looking for on 16" alloys? And how does the bore size work out? On my previous car, when changing from 16's (bore size 57.1) up to 17s (bore size 66.something) sprigets are needed to account for the loss of space between the wheel hub and bore diameter of the alloy but if I'm downgrading from 17s to 16's?
My notes say 7J x 16” ET45 with a bore of 57.1. Bolts PCD 5x112, M14 x 1.5

Skoda it appears, deliberately engineered the OEM wheels to be interchangeable in both 17” and 16” diameters. So very little is different apart from the diameters. As The Hood points out with his Audi wheels, the same is true across a number of other cars in the VAG family.

There should be plenty of genuine OEM Yeti pattern wheels passing through the UK breakers these days. One of the popular patterns for the 16” diameter was “Nevis”, seven spoke. There are a couple of other patterns in 16”. Were many Yetis sold in Ireland? Do breakers in RoI sell wheels as sets?

I bought my second set from a former member in here who was moving to a Suzuki. Complete with Toyo winter tyres each with 7mm of tread remaining, the four came to £250 in folding money for collection personally from about 25 miles distant.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
My notes say 7J x 16” ET45 with a bore of 57.1. Bolts PCD 5x112, M14 x 1.5

Skoda it appears, deliberately engineered the OEM wheels to be interchangeable in both 17” and 16” diameters. So very little is different apart from the diameters. As The Hood points out with his Audi wheels, the same is true across a number of other cars in the VAG family.

There should be plenty of genuine OEM Yeti pattern wheels passing through the UK breakers these days. One of the popular patterns for the 16” diameter was “Nevis”, seven spoke. There are a couple of other patterns in 16”. Were many Yetis sold in Ireland? Do breakers in RoI sell wheels as sets?

I bought my second set from a former member in here who was moving to a Suzuki. Complete with Toyo winter tyres each with 7mm of tread remaining, the four came to £250 in folding money for collection personally from about 25 miles distant.
Sounds like you got a great deal, I hadn't thought of a breakers or part finder, thanks for the info 👍
 

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as someone who visits family in the more culchie parts of Kilkenny, well I did until earlier this year, the thought of doing those roads on overinflated tyres brings tears to my eyes. I have similar weather here in South Wales and can recommend cross climates as a tyre to handle a lot of rain, not cheap though. On a 17 inch rim they cost more and still give quite a firm ride, so I'll leave it to you to decide how you like your ride and how much to spend.
welcome to the world of yeti.
 

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Here is a shot of both types of wheel/tyre. The winters are directional and are swapped between the front and rear hence the label. The 16 on the right is much more comfortable with the extra rubber and air between the rim and road.

4662
 

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A picture like that is exactly why we bought a Niro2 and not one of the higher spec'ed models. Mine's on 16" when all the others are 18" .
 

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Here is a shot of both types of wheel/tyre. The winters are directional and are swapped between the front and rear hence the label. The 16 on the right is much more comfortable with the extra rubber and air between the rim and road.

View attachment 4662
Looking at the picture, the rh 16" wheel/tyre gives it a more muscle look for the Yeti.
 

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That 16" Audi wheel on the right, is very similar in style to a Skoda "Nevis", but not quite!
 

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Odd to give the rim a name similar to the Latin for birthmarks (nevi). Who thinks these up and is there a department of silly names at Skoda - I mean Enyaq, Kodiaq and so on. Psshhsfftt.
 

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If you want silly names look at Japenese vehicles.
They grey import Mazda Bongo is called the 'Moving Cottage in the land of the rising sun!
Just in case some peeps don't know what a Bongo is!
 

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Odd to give the rim a name similar to the Latin for birthmarks (nevi). Who thinks these up and is there a department of silly names at Skoda - I mean Enyaq, Kodiaq and so on. Psshhsfftt.
Would you say the same about Scotland’s highest mountain though?
 

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Ben Nevis is an anglicised version of the Gaelic name for the mountain. From Wikipedia:

Ben Nevis" is an Anglicisation of the Scottish Gaelic name "Beinn Nibheis". "Beinn" is the most common Gaelic word for "mountain", "Nibheis" is variously understood, though the word is commonly translated as "malicious" or "venomous"; however, the Gaelic neimh "poison, venom" is not likely to be the source of Nibheis, which appears to be the genitive form of a male (God's?) name; likewise an origin from neamh "heaven" (which has fallen in with nèamh "bright, shining" in modern Gaelic) has difficulties; however, the reference could be in origin to the god Lugh, whose place of worship was often on mountain tops throughout the Celtic world. An alternative interpretation is that "Beinn Nibheis" derives from "beinn nèamh-bhathais", from "nèamh" "heavens, clouds" and "bathais" "top of a man's head". One translation would therefore be "the mountain with its head in the clouds", though "mountain of Heaven" is also frequently given. The present Gaelic form Nibheis may conserve an earlier Pictish form, *Nebestis or *Nebesta, involving the Celtic root *neb, "clouds" (c.f. Welsh nef).

Scottish Gaelic is a Goidelic language developed from Old Irish and bears no relationship to classical Latin but zzzzzzzzzz [continued on Page 94 Ed]
 

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Ben Nevis is an anglicised version of the Gaelic name for the mountain. From Wikipedia:

Ben Nevis" is an Anglicisation of the Scottish Gaelic name "Beinn Nibheis". "Beinn" is the most common Gaelic word for "mountain", "Nibheis" is variously understood, though the word is commonly translated as "malicious" or "venomous"; however, the Gaelic neimh "poison, venom" is not likely to be the source of Nibheis, which appears to be the genitive form of a male (God's?) name; likewise an origin from neamh "heaven" (which has fallen in with nèamh "bright, shining" in modern Gaelic) has difficulties; however, the reference could be in origin to the god Lugh, whose place of worship was often on mountain tops throughout the Celtic world. An alternative interpretation is that "Beinn Nibheis" derives from "beinn nèamh-bhathais", from "nèamh" "heavens, clouds" and "bathais" "top of a man's head". One translation would therefore be "the mountain with its head in the clouds", though "mountain of Heaven" is also frequently given. The present Gaelic form Nibheis may conserve an earlier Pictish form, *Nebestis or *Nebesta, involving the Celtic root *neb, "clouds" (c.f. Welsh nef).

Scottish Gaelic is a Goidelic language developed from Old Irish and bears no relationship to classical Latin but zzzzzzzzzz [continued on Page 94 Ed]
I always remember this from a child visiting Scotland, see if you can translate it (it is car related, but considering it would have been well over 50 years ago may not be 100% correct)
"Tha tiger agam na mo thanc"
 

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Perhaps Skoda were thinking of something in the Slavic language when they named the “Triglav” style of 17” alloy?
 
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