Yeti Owners Club banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone have any thoughts on this?
If I leave my 2012 Yeti 2l diesel DSG in the garage for a week then the battery will be as dead as a doornail. I mean really 3v dead. The staff at Rainworth Skoda have been really positive but they are struggling to find a reason for this. They have had the car for 5 days recently and this time it is 8 days and counting. They have left it on their diagnostics for days at a time and have confirmed that the battery is good but they can't resolve the problem. Has anyone else encountered this problem? Does anyone have any suggestions. Many thanks.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,358 Posts
1/ Do you turn everything off, like the radio, before you lock the car? I seem to remember a report of a faulty Bolero unit by someone.

2/ Do you leave anything plugged in, like a sat nav or phone charger?

3/ Do you have any dash cams connected?

Edited by: Llanigraham
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,460 Posts
There has been one that flattened the battery in a day or so, and that was down to a bad contact on a rely in the engine compartment fuse box.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
213 Posts
5P, the Yeti is so well made that the obvious things don't go wrong (as I can testify and if they are obvious should be quickly fixed) so it is probably two faults. If your battery is going that flat in a week must be ~~0.5A load when off, given it really is a good battery and really charging properly (which should be 101 electrics for them to check).

If the garage put a current probe on the battery line when the car is fully off they should see that current. Then it is a matter of removing fuses and disconnecting loads to find the culprit. But I find it hard to believe they have not done that in the time they have had it.

If that did not work I would change the battery or disconnect it to see if it goes flat on its own due to internal leakage their equipment can't detect but usually only one or two cells fail that way which would not give you 3V after a week. - See what I mean more than one thing is going on. I am sure they will cure it. :). Although to be fair to Rangeworth Boeing have not solved the 787 battery problem and they are smart cookies. Good luck, let us know progress.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
At the risk of swearing (by saying Ford before anyone thinks I'm going to go off on one!), I had something similar in one of my previous cars, a Focus. Blooming thing simply ate batteries. The AA plugged their gizmo into it whenever the had to come out to it as I had a flat attery (again). Alternator was Ok, no apparent electrical discharge (e.g. boot-light etc - but I'd already checked that and it was cold) etc, Mr AA decided it was simply 'an old car'. To be fair, he had a point in that it was 10-year old, which is old for modern cars.

My point (and there is one) is that sometimes you never get to the bottom of it. My solution was probably not the way that you want to go though - I got rid of the car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
394 Posts
Long shot this: I read, or was told about, a car that did that - it turned out that if the air vents were left open it did something to the alarm that then flattened the battery over a period of time. It was very difficult to find as it was, obviously, intermittent. If your car is in a garage its unlikely that this is the issue but it sometimes helps to think along different lines...

I think I'd be looking to borrow another battery to try if you haven't already, as there is no recorded drain being shown on the diagnostics. If that fails remove the alternator and have an auto-electrical specialist check it out.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,104 Posts
Take the vehicle for a good 40 mile run to fully charge the battery. Then park it in the garage and disconnect a terminal. If the battery flattens while in the disconnected state then you have a battery with an internal short. If it doesn't flatten while disconnected then you know it is something within the vehicles electrical circuitry. This simple test will at least give you a starting point and point you in the right direction for an answer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
Hello 5P

The responses of Ferdie and Plbxr are the logical approach that you can do yourself given that the dealer has yet to find a resolution.

Deal with the battery first, ensure it is in a fully charged state using an intelligent battery charger if you can disconnecting the negative terminal before commencing and once through the charge routine leave for a short time to let it settle and test the voltage which logically for a battery in reasonable condition will be around 12.8 volts.

Observe the battery every day testing the voltage which for a fully charged item should not self discharge appreciably over one week, alternatively take it to a battery dealership and have them put a load test device on it which will definitely determine whether the battery is at fault as it should recover from such a test to at least 12.5 volts.

Assuming the battery is good then as Ferdie says deal with the electrical loads until the issue is located, I don't have a schematic diagram or a service manual available to make suggestions however logically it must be feasible to isolate systems and track down the problem although of course even this may fail to find it if the issue is intermittent in nature although from your description of the symptons it would seem probable this one is a definite fault.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
213 Posts
I like Epicyclic's reply, thinking out side the box there. Some times the alarm indicates if it has gone off by flashing at a different rate when you come back to the car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Ferdie said:
5P, the Yeti is so well made that the obvious things don't go wrong (as I can testify and if they are obvious should be quickly fixed) so it is probably two faults. If your battery is going that flat in a week must be ~~0.5A load when off, given it really is a good battery and really charging properly (which should be 101 electrics for them to check).

If the garage put a current probe on the battery line when the car is fully off they should see that current. Then it is a matter of removing fuses and disconnecting loads to find the culprit. But I find it hard to believe they have not done that in the time they have had it.

If that did not work I would change the battery or disconnect it to see if it goes flat on its own due to internal leakage their equipment can't detect but usually only one or two cells fail that way which would not give you 3V after a week. - See what I mean more than one thing is going on. I am sure they will cure it. :). Although to be fair to Rangeworth Boeing have not solved the 787 battery problem and they are smart cookies. Good luck, let us know progress.

+1 on this one as that is the proper way to figure out what is draining the battery.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Many thanks for all of your helpful suggestions. After 2 weeks of testing everything the thorough Rainworth Skoda people felt that the battery was the most likely culprit. I have a brand new, shiny genuine VW battery on it and they even polished my Yeti (Skippy) for me. 3 cheers for the Rainworth Skoda folk. I will let you all know how we get on.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,104 Posts
That's good news
. Hopefully it's all sorted for you now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
394 Posts
Well done, keep us posted....
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
14,898 Posts
I would have thought they could have "borrowed" the battery from another Yeti to try at first, and have saved you the bother of loosing your car. That said I am probably biased toward Rainworth as they supplied my car. Hope the problem is solved.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
A month ago the battery of my Yeti discharged due to the Bolero radio going into a fault state. I reset the radio by removing and then re-establishing the power to it. I have had no problems with battery or radio since then.
Whilst setting off in a hurry I momentarily knocked the radio power button either just before or after engaging reverse gear. I think the reversing beep was interrupted. I pushed the radio button again and took the car out of reverse, re-engaged reverse again and set off on my drive with the radio apparently off.
Later in the day I wanted to listen to the radio. I could navigate around the display but there was no sound. The volume bar displayed but did not move when the knob was turned.
When I went to start the car after having left it four days the battery was flat.
I put a battery charger on the Yeti (without disconnecting the terminals) for about six hours but to no avail.
At that stage I decided to get some ideas from the forums.
I disconnected the battery and charged it alone to test if that was the problem. I located the fuse for the radio. The battery held its charge and I reconnected it with an ammeter in line to measure the current draw. While playing around I turned on the radio, it worked!
My conclusion after a month with no problems is that the Bolero got into a fault state and did not turn off when the ignition was turned off thereby draining the battery.
I wonder how many owners have changed perfectly good batteries unaware of this problem because changing the battery interrupts the power supply to the Bolero and clears the radio's fault state. Equally for those brought up on simple 'steam' radios the idea of a radio getting into a code lockup (or costing £630 +VAT) is unfamiliar. I have not tried to reproduce the action or sequence of actions that caused the fault state.
A few things I learnt.
Fuse F8, in the fusebox next to the battery, passes the power to both the Bolero and the MDF.
All the car's settings apart from the clock and the trip counter are retained when current from the battery is interrupted.
If after turning off the ignition the radio is turned on, the car is exited and the doors closed, the interior lights go off in 30 seconds or so, the MDF goes off in a few minutes, and the radio stays on for sometime between 30 to 60 minutes. While the radio is on it draws about 2 amps. I conjecture that the Bolero gets into a fault state, does not turn off and it remains in this state until its power is interrupted.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
5,157 Posts
Welcome to the forum LanciaFulvia. A useful tale that may help others. The tip on removing the fuse under the bonnet for the radio has been used to resolve a number ofinfortainment issues but I don't recall anyone having traced any battery drain problem to it.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
14,898 Posts
Welcome to the forum lanciafulvia, my Bolero had a wobbly a while ago. Whilst reversing the sound cut out, no parking sensors etc. In the evening rather than mess about finding the right fuse I just dissconnected the battery for a minute, and like yours the fault cleared. I do a high milage and did not leave it long enough for the battery to drain so I don't know if it would have drained my battery. There was a fault recorded in the ecu which cleared after a set number of succesful starts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
760 Posts
Hi Hood, After disconnecting the battery for one minute, did you need to restablish any codes or did all aspects of the Yeti reconnect without an issue?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
After reconnecting the battery there are a few odd warning lights on but these all extinguish as soon as the car is driven. The clock needs to be set to the right time and the trip milage has been zeroed but otherwise all the MDF settings are the same as before disconnection.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top