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Not particularly other then the jacking point is on the seam so the jack lifting head needs a slot/groove to fit onto the seam. Is your question related to a jack to keep in the boot with a spare or a trolley jack?

Standard VW jack found in the spare kit is often like this. Note the head fits onto the seam.
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Discussion Starter #3
Not particularly other then the jacking point is on the seam so the jack lifting head needs a slot/groove to fit onto the seam. Is your question related to a jack to keep in the boot with a spare or a trolley jack?

Standard VW jack found in the spare kit is often like this. Note the head fits onto the seam.
View attachment 4587
Hi it’s to keep in the boot thanks for the info much appreciated.Colin
 

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All my Skoda jacks have been the diamond shaped scissor type. (Luckily I have never needed them, so have never taken them out of the bag)
TIP... do NOT buy on Ebay they are often too flimsy. When I bought a genuine Skoda space saver with tools from my local 'car dismantler' I was amazed at how heavy/sturdy they were. Go to your local 'scrappy' and make sure it has VAG stamped on it.
I have a 2ton trolley jack in my garage and when I jacked up one corner of the Karoq the amount of creaking and complaining from the jack was quite surprising.
 

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TIP... do NOT buy on Ebay they are often too flimsy. When I bought a genuine Skoda space saver with tools from my local 'car dismantler' I was amazed at how heavy/sturdy they were. Go to your local 'scrappy' and make sure it has VAG stamped on it.
Except perhaps when the local vehicle dismantler is selling online the genuine OEM Skoda/VAG stamped jacks, taken from scrapped vehicles. As many do, via their own or collective Ebay Shops.

The days of wandering into any scrapyard with your own tools, then removing the part you wanted from a stack if cars 3 or 4 high, are sadly long gone. Yes it was unsafe. Often fun though. A few still permit very limited "searching". Most don't allow strangers on the premises though. Some have their own sales counter, where you can pop in and ask for the part you want. The majority sell components removed by themselves through online trading platforms though.

Otherwise, totally agree that a lot of the jacks sold as "new", or "unused", on any trading site as "fits XYZ", are not fit for purpose. Yes, they might fit, but does that give any indication of sturdiness, safety or durability?

The caution applies equally to any of the marketplace items advertised via any of the various platforms, Amazon, Faceblog, Gumtree, etc., etc. Not just Ebay. In practice Ebay is possibly among the more reliable of the group, as its seller feedback ratings allow the buyer to assess before purchase, how previous buyers have rated the seller's reliability (as distinct from the product). Whereas Facebook Marketplace (to name just one of the others) seems to attract the more amateur and wacky end of the seller spectrum. (E.G. Householders selling furniture like a bookcase, without giving dimensions in the advert. Or just a string of numbers without units. Who then seem to get annoyed when you contact them to ask for more information or if the numbers are height, width or depth, in inches or cm). By comparison Amazon marketplace items are often wide open to "fake reviews" on specific products. Something that Which?/Consumers Association have warned about several times.

Emergency use jacks are one of the items that are relatively reliable to buy second hand from breakers. As many will have been unused. The more professional breakers yards or "vehicle dismantlers" often specialise in a particular marque and nearly new vehicles that are being written off due to collision damage, etc. Some will advertise a vehicle just in for dismantling and offer something trivial, like a wheel nut. then you contact them to buy the specific part you want. Such as emergency jack, or undamaged light cluster, etc.
 
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The days of wandering into any scrapyard with your own tools, then removing the part you wanted from a stack if cars 3 or 4 high, are sadly long gone. Yes it was unsafe. Often fun though. A few still permit very limited "searching". Most don't allow strangers on the premises though.
Ah yes, many a happy hour spent mountaineering and treasure hunting at Hunters of Alperton. They were one of the safer "srappies" as they only stacked three high great fun. :)
 

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Yes - those were the days! I remember removing a dizzy from a scrapped Bedford Midi and noticing the donor van looked in better condition than mine.
 

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If you intend to change a wheel on your Yeti, the jack is very much a crucial part of the exercise, as has been pointed out, the Jacking point is on the join and so a totally flat top to the jack is not good. You can get "Hockey puck" bridging bits that span the seam, but really I think stacking bits on the top of a jack and then winding away is potentially problematic. When you get a jack, check you know where to jack and try it out,

Scrap yards, I had a bad front end shunt in a Triumph 2000, the local scrappy had one with the front end still in primer, good chiselling gave me such a good solution, I bought the write off of mine for £50, the bits were about the same, a mate in the trade welded the two together and I was back on the road for less than £150. The new thing sold later for £200.
 

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Look for the triangle symbol underneath the car which indicates the correct jacking point, which I'm lead to believe isn't visible until its jacked up!!!!, so have a feel for it with your fingers. Ignore the masking tape, as I understand that position is incorrect as its actually the drain point for water collected elsewhere.


YJ.jpg
 

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Anyone know if this one is any good? At just £15 the price suggests not..


View attachment 4607
These are notoriously less stable. But OK in an emergency. So long as you don't rely on it while you have your head under the wheel arch.

The type shown by SnowGood in #2 are often more robustly constructed. Despite looking less. They generally have a stability advantage too. As the car rises through an arc, pivoting on the opposite side wheels, the jack pad rises through an arc with it. Rolling over on the single "foot" slightly. Perhaps counter-intuitively, that puts less sideways leverage on both the car's sill seam, and the jack itself. which helps the stability. Even though they look to have only one "leg".

Those in #2 are also the type of emergency jack issued by Skoda as part of the spare wheel & kit.

Also bear in mind those like the green example, seldom have enough lift range to sit on the ground and then also lift high enough to first cover the distance to the Yeti's sill, then raise that enough to allow the suspension travel to lift the wheel. They'll often need something the depth of a brick to stand on. Preferably wider though for stability.
 
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The tittle of this thread makes me think of car theft!!! :eek:
Appropriate that it should be linked with the scrap yards thread perhaps? ;)
 

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My local dismantler is. Charles Trent – Leaders In Vehicle Recycling | Used Car Parts | Car Breakers | Salvage Auctions | Scrap Yard | Scrap Your Car
They have been going since I was a kid and often went 'mountaineering' with my Pa and a pocket full of (Whitworth) spanners. They are part of a network of dismantlers and will source bits they don't have from other dismantlers and will also post bits.
Years ago number 2 son 'retired' his engine of his Audi 80 in spectacular fashion. Charlie Trent didn't have one but they found one in Wales, had it sent to Poole on a pallet, we picked it up and paid Trents. So any bits you need, wherever you are,It's worth a 'phone call
The space saver alluded to by me previously was from a Tiguan and came with a SCISSOR jack Not the one legged type shown by Snowgood. It was VERY heavily. built and stamped with VAG.
Personally I would not touch the green one mentioned above. The typical Yeti weight is just over two tons gross and the Karoq is 200 Kg LIGHTER. When I jacked up one FRONT corner of the 'Kroq' on my 2 ton hydraulic trolley jack it creaked and groaned quite alarmingly (bear in mind the front corners are considerably heavier than the rear, due to the engine & gearbox) So to lift a Yeti front corner with a 1 ton jack would IMO be a recipe for disaster!!
 
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They'll often need something the depth of a brick to stand on. Preferably wider though for stability.
But, please, not a brick or a breeze block or anything that can (and will) crumble! Wood or steel, OK, but you are getting les stable whenever you add bits like that, especially at the side of the road in a difficult situation.
 

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I assume my ex Tiguan jack will be more than man enough for my Karoq. Since the Tig is a lot heavier than the 'Kroq'
 

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But, please, not a brick or a breeze block or anything that can (and will) crumble! Wood or steel, OK, but you are getting les stable whenever you add bits like that.
Have you ever been to the less salubrious areas of Liverpool? The old jokes about not parking a car by the roadside with nearly new tyres, had a modicum of basis in reality. Ex-bomb site bricks were however in plentiful supply! ;):ROFLMAO:
(With apologies to all modern Liverpudlians!) :)

Seriously - I agree! Just mentioned the brick as a depth gauge, not a serious suggestion. I do however carry a 6"x8"x2" block of timber in the under-floor area of the Yeti. Jack load-spreader on softer ground for the use of. Not had to use for the Yeti in 7.5 years. But has come in handy for other people's cars on soft verges or similar.
 

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Referring back to the OP, have we convinced you that getting a really good jack without thought of cost? I have a scissors jack that I didn't feel happy with, I now have one from a Yeti. I hope we are being helpful, I imply no criticism of you.
 

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I prefer a compact bottle jack and a small block of wood between the jack and car, but the Karoq has a pad rather than the seam on the Yeti.
 
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