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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Bit of a weird one this. I've noticed lately while changing up gears (especially 1st to 2nd) that I'm getting a dull thud when going into 2nd gear. It does do it in all gears if I change gear quite quickly, but it is a lot more noticeable from 1st to 2nd. This is definitely a new problem and my driving style has't changed!

The noise 100% sounds like it is coming from the back of the car. Sometimes I can also replicate the noise when the car is stationary, going from 1st to 2nd with the clutch down, but it doesn't make the sound all the time.

Has anyone else experienced this or have any idea what it might be?

Thanks
 

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Yeti Outdoor 2017 SE L 2.0TDi 150 4x4 Manual
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After waiting to discover if anyone else had ideas on this, seems no one has?

Two times I've experienced anything similar:
1) A very worn support bearing on the layshaft in the gearbox of one of my Escort RS2000s, over 30 years ago. The dull thud every time I changed from 2nd to 3rd was the layshaft being forced violently against the gearbox bearing casing/ bearing housing. When it got bad enough that I started losing gears, I swapped the box with one salvaged from a 2-litre Cortina estate, newly arrived at the scrapyard. Which turned out to be in excellent condition.
2) My current 330d about 4-5 years ago. But that was when going from power on to power off in any gear. But more noticeable in the lower gears when the torque effect was highest. That was the centre support bearing breaking up, in the middle of the prop shaft.

Back to your Yeti...
Could there be a worn bearing in the diff? Or Haldex unit on the front of that?
Or even the donut at the tail end of the prop-shaft that sits between the shaft and the nose of the Haldex unit?
 

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Or even the donut at the tail end of the prop-shaft that sits between the shaft and the nose of the Haldex unit?
That was my first thought but I too waited.
The fact that the thud happens when stationary would be due to natural clutch drag.
Easy item to check though.
 

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Yeti Outdoor 2017 SE L 2.0TDi 150 4x4 Manual
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Maybe? Can't be ruled out. To my, limited, knowledge a worn/failing DMF manifests itself more as a rattle, heard most from outside the car when at idle with the clutch engaged but out of gear. I.E. when sitting at idle in neutral. Still possible as the source of the OP's "clunk" though?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for your replies, have given me a few ideas and a few more questions.

I think the diff noise might need further investigation, but I'm hoping that isn't the case! A bit more info on the Yeti, it's a 2014, 65K, last had Haldex serviced in late 2019, and I don't think its ever towed anything...

The donut had crossed my mind, the bit that I'm not understanding is how I can get it to make a noise when the clutch is depressed. From driving it a bit more it seems it is the action of moving into gear (clutch depressed) that makes the clunk as well as using clutch normally, It almost sounds like something is rolling about in the boot.

I was wondering if there is anything on the rear diff/haldex that is triggered by the action of changing gear that could be causing the noise?

Many thanks once again!
 

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Is there any rotational free play in the prop shaft to the diff?
 
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It could be several things from clutch drag to the centre bearing in the propshaft, to the doughnut (no8). How does the clutch pedal "feel"? If the slave cylinder were failing it could cause clutch drag when the pedal is depressed, that would cause a clonk when stationary and changing gear with the clutch depressed, or it could be a combination. Are you able to get underneath and try rotating the propshaft by hand to see if there is any backlash?

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From driving it a bit more it seems it is the action of moving into gear (clutch depressed) that makes the clunk
Any clunk when engaging a gear indicates to me that either there is an internal problem in the gearbox, or the clutch isn't being fully disengaged (or both).

Start with the low-hanging fruit; The first thing I would try would be to adjust the seat one notch forward, just to remove any doubt that I wasn't depressing the pedal fully.
Also check there is no carpet or other obstruction stopping the pedal achieving its full travel.
If that makes no difference, I would then try bleeding the clutch hydraulics.

After that, start looking into the mechanical aspects as mentioned above.
 
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