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We have a new member with a fuel problem he is located in India and sent me a P.M. I will put his message into this post so that others may be able to help him.
This was my reply to him......

Hi, has your mechanic used a fault code reader on the car, if he has can you tell us what codes were returned. I will also publish your message on the forum in a thread called "Diesel fuel Problem 86000 k 2012 4x4" in the technical section,
 

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Wonder if he means the DPF lamp by "Diesel light"?
 
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Wonder if he means the DPF lamp by "Diesel light"?
Good thought! That could explain why the first thing attempted was to change the fuel filter? ("Diesel" and "Filter"?) And some of the other described symptoms. Assuming a diesel Yeti sold in India does have a DPF fitted in the first place?

yyetiboyy
  • When the car is running reasonably OK, are you able to take it for a good drive of 20-miles (30 km) each way in reasonably clear traffic? Depending exactly what part of India you are, that may or may not be so easy?
  • If you can, try to take it for a drive where you can let the engine get up to full operating temperature, then stay running at a fairly constant speed for at least 10 miles / 16 km or so afterwards. Preferably with the engine running at a reasonably constant speed. Ideally up around 2000-3000 rpm or preferably a little higher. With as few short stops or slow-downs as possible. Even if that means running in a lower gear than normal for a prolonged period.
  • That should allow the engine to perform its own Diesel Particle Filter (DPF) :) regeneration cycle. Provided the DPF is not blocked beyond that being possible.
  • The self-regeneration process injects extra fuel into the cylinders on the exhaust stoke of each cycle. That burns in the exhaust and brings the exhaust gas temperature as it leaves the engine up to well over 300 degrees C. Nearer 600C in practice. That in turns burns off the soot particles that may be blocking the DPF?
  • The process will only triggered though, if there are no other faults present, and the engine thinks it is already on a reasonably long enough run for the DPF regeneration process to have a chance of completing.
  • As said, such a run may not be easy in the more urban parts of India. And you would have to be able to stay clear of the trucks and cows along the road?

  • Assuming SnowGood's idea is correct of course....?? Or that your car actually has a DPF?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The OP has sent me another PM, I have told him to post here as I will ignore any more messages sent directly to me. Here is his reply.
4610
 

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Good thought! That could explain why the first thing attempted was to change the fuel filter? ("Diesel" and "Filter"?) And some of the other described symptoms. Assuming a diesel Yeti sold in India does have a DPF fitted in the first place?

yyetiboyy
  • When the car is running reasonably OK, are you able to take it for a good drive of 20-miles (30 km) each way in reasonably clear traffic? Depending exactly what part of India you are, that may or may not be so easy?

  • Initially after changing the diesel filter I drove it for 150 km and the glow lamp plug shot up, after that it has been consistent and had to call skoda mechanic to take the car away and that is when he checked the ECU and suggested getting it repaired as he thought that was causing the glow light plug to light up,

  • If you can, try to take it for a drive where you can let the engine get up to full operating temperature, then stay running at a fairly constant speed for at least 10 miles / 16 km or so afterwards. Preferably with the engine running at a reasonably constant speed. Ideally up around 2000-3000 rpm or preferably a little higher. With as few short stops or slow-downs as possible. Even if that means running in a lower gear than normal for a prolonged period.

  • Yes the skoda mechanic drove the car immediately after changing the diesel filter for 70 Km and had said the problem seems to be solved, and the next day after driving the car for not more than a few meters the glow light plug appeared and my engine stalled.

  • That should allow the engine to perform its own Diesel Particle Filter (DPF) :) regeneration cycle. Provided the DPF is not blocked beyond that being possible.
  • The only solution i found after the engine stalled was opening the diesel fuel cap and cranking the engine and this helped me in starting the car, and later on when i tried it didn’t workout
  • .
 

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Those fuel system codes suggest either:
  • a failed pressure sensor in the end of the fuel rail. Not sending a fuel pressure signal.
  • a failed or failing high pressure fuel pump, feeding diesel into the common rail.
  • or something else related to the high pressure side of fuel system.
If the engine actually runs OK. Then the first guess would seem the more likely?
 

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Without knowing anything about it, looks to me like 2 sensors not agreeing with each other, look what effect that had for the Boeing 747 Max.
 
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Those fuel system codes suggest either:
  • a failed pressure sensor in the end of the fuel rail. Not sending a fuel pressure signal.
  • a failed or failing high pressure fuel pump, feeding diesel into the common rail.
  • or something else related to the high pressure side of fuel system.
If the engine actually runs OK. Then the first guess would seem the more likely?
Even the skoda technicians are dumbstruck by this, thats when he suggested as a last resort Changing the entire fuel system might be the only fix available, and They are also checking the starting relay in conjunction with ECU, as they have very little idea what is causing the glow light plug to light up
 

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Nic - 737 Max-8 was the one that had/has MCAS over-riding pilot input, while relying on a single attitude sensor. To think there used to be patriotic US Trump voters who would “only fly Boeing” because they considered Airbus “fly by wire” systems too dangerous.


Thanks for response Yyetiboyy.

Glow plug dash fault light can be illuminated by seemingly dozens if not hundreds of different system faults. Those fault code readouts are much more helpful.

If those guys are stumped though, then we’ve got no chance.
 

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Nic - 737 Max-8 was the one that had/has MCAS over-riding pilot input, while relying on a single attitude sensor.
Exactly, failed sensor, his problem could be simply one of those 2 sensors.
 

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If the Skoda techs in India have already seen those codes though? Surely the common rail pressure sensor would have been the first item they replaced?

Yyetiboyy
  • Is the car being assessed by Skoda trained dealer technicians you mention in #10?
  • Or by your local “mechanic” you mention in your note to The Hood in #2.
  • Could there be a difference between those in ability to interpret fault codes?
Has the common fuel rail pressure sensor been replaced yet?
That’s the one on top of the engine (but under the big plastic cover still), to the right end of the large fuel rail as you look at it from the front of the car. (Your right. The car’s left.)
 

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If the Skoda techs in India have already seen those codes though? Surely the common rail pressure sensor would have been the first item they replaced?

Yyetiboyy
  • Is the car being assessed by Skoda trained dealer technicians you mention in #10?
  • Or by your local “mechanic” you mention in your note to The Hood in #2.
  • Could there be a difference between those in ability to interpret fault codes?
Has the common fuel rail pressure sensor been replaced yet?
That’s the one on top of the engine (but under the big plastic cover still), to the right end of the large fuel rail as you look at it from the front of the car. (Your right. The car’s left.)
my local mechanic is the skoda mechanic when he saw the codes he suggested replacing the entire fuel assembly as in India you just can’t change the sensor and also what he noticed was when any miscellaneous equipment in the car heats up is when the glow plug lights up, and also he couldn’t find any short circuit as such.
 

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my local mechanic is the skoda mechanic when he saw the codes he suggested replacing the entire fuel assembly as in India you just can’t change the sensor and also what he noticed was when any miscellaneous equipment in the car heats up is when the glow plug lights up
That sounds like an April 1st post.
Why cannot you change just the sensor in India?
What parts are involved in ""replacing the entire fuel assembly""?
The glow plug light will come to indicate numerous faults.
 
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Onbehalf the customer, myself sony raphel, ( owner of Volkswshop Automotive ) explain about the complaint as follows
Sometimes vehicle will goes to switched of, without any similar situations ( km basis / temperature / speed/ fuel tank capacity )
If the vehicle switched off, after a while may be half an hour / may be two hours / may be next day will start the vehicle after once erased the fault code in the scanner

P008700 rail pressure too low
P106500 fuel pressure Regulation control difference
 

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Thanks for coming on here in response sony. Just located your facebook page. That totally clears up all lingering doubts about code interpretation or professionalism of the technician. And confirms the genuine nature of the enquiry.

Still sounds like either the fuel rail pressure sensor, or as The Hood offered, the high pressure fuel pump.

Are you able to obtain those parts separately? Both should be in similar use across many cars from the VW-Audi group.

Do you know if the car has at any time had or has a performance enhancing, plug-in "tuning box" used on it? Those mostly work by fooling the ECU of the true pressure sensor reading. So in some cases can give rise to fault codes like these? Although those normally go away after the tuning box is removed again.

The time lapse after receiving the fault code, before the ECU allows itself to have another go at starting the car, will be the ECU waiting till it can regard the code as "historic". How long that waiting time to reset is, varies from manufacturer to manufacturer. I once had an Opel Kadett ECU that waited 2 hours before working again, after any code received. Also explains why the time can be reduced by clearing all current and stored historic codes. Until a fresh error returns.

Best regards to Kerala by the way! The best part of India IMO.
 
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