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Discussion Starter #1
Can anybody provide a simple description of the difference between the Twin Clutch DSG Auto Trans as opposed to the Torque Converter Auto Trans as found in a normal automatic cars??


Is there a normal box of cogs lurking somewhere in the DSG with some "simply clever" force from the "Dark Side" doing the changing or is DSG just a clever marketing name for a regular old auto trans??
 

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The DSG gearbox is basically a manual gearbox that is controlled electronically. It has two clutches instead of the usual one. One clutch acts on the odd numbered gears (1,3,5,7) and the other clutch acts on the even gears (2,4,6 and reverse). It operates in the same fashion as a normal manual gearbox and is fitted with a normal manual gearset. However the job of engaging and disengaging the clutches and the job of shifting the gears into place is done by the mechatronics unit. This unit has a computer that receives electrical signals from sensors that determines when to use the clutch and when to change the gears. In essence the mechatronics replaces the job done by your left foot (clutch) and left arm (gearshifter). It moves the clutch and gearshifter by using hydraulic pressure that is built up by a pump built into the mechatronics unit. In the 6 speed DSG it uses the gearbox oil to build up the hydraulic pressure and in the 7 speed DSG it uses an internal electrical pump and hydraulic fluid to build up the pressure. The actual gearbox part is filled with VW's manual gearbox oil. In the 7 speed it is the same gearbox oil that all the manual VW gearboxes have in them. Because of the two clutches, while one clutch is engaged and is transmitting power to the wheels the next gear in sequence can be selected at the same time because its clutch is disengaged. When it is time to change gear the first clutch disengages as the second one engages. So there are always two gears selected but only one is actually transmitting power. There are no torque converters in a DSG.


Edited by: plbxr
 

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I'm no mechanic but my understanding is that it does not have a torque converter, and the mechatronics (the brains I guess) operate the clutch and gear changes with the help of sensors, and "adaptive logic" that is programmed into it.
I've heard it described as an "automated manual gearbox".
Google "DSG" and go to "images" , there is plenty to see.
Rob.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Many thanks, sounds very high tech, given that I now own one I hope they are pretty reliable, I have read about the recalls for the DSG, "the dealer says" (would like a dollar for every time those words are used) the recall problem should not be a problem with the 6 speed DSG. Common sense is telling me that maintaining the right fluids in the unit is going to be important. Not at all like my old Land Rover, literally have been able fix that with fencing wire.
 

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Hi, I'm new to this forum, I've just ordered a Yeti 2.0 TDi CR 140PS 4x4 DSG DPF for delivery end of September.
Which gearbox will it have, the 6 speed or 7 speed, I cannot see it mentioned on the spec sheet.
 

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Hooky said:
Hi, I'm new to this forum, I've just ordered a Yeti 2.0 TDi CR 140PS 4x4 DSG DPF for delivery end of September.
Which gearbox will it have, the 6 speed or 7 speed, I cannot see it mentioned on the spec sheet.
Welcome.



Six speed



Steve.
 
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