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There are now rumblings that part of the recent fuel "shortage problem" was the introduction of E10 petrol. Fuel stations has run their tanks as low as possible for the introduction of E10. When the initial panic set in there was a much reduced buffer which combined with the less than 100% availability of tanker drivers meant demand outstripped supply. Before someone say Ah!! but diesel ran out as well, a panic on petrol would create a similar surge in demand with diesel. There are still long queues around here but hopefully the idiots will have filled their cars and baths soon and demand will fall.
 

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Regarding the length of queues...
We have lost a significant number of filling stations in the UK over the last 20 years;
Rectangle Slope Font Line Plot

All other factors being equal, this alone will increase the average queue length at each site.

In the town closest to where I grew up there were seven petrol stations forty years ago. Now there are three.
 

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Regarding the length of queues...
We have lost a significant number of filling stations in the UK over the last 20 years;
View attachment 6443
All other factors being equal, this alone will increase the average queue length at each site.

In the town closest to where I grew up in mid-Staffordshire, there were seven petrol stations forty years ago, and now there are three.
Now take into account the rise in number of cars on the road, plus the rise in average mileage per year and that graph doesn't show the full story.

However, as a rule the number of pumps in each filling station has risen, so I have a feeling if you used the amount of pumps not filling stations you would see a different trend.
 

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Kia Niro HEV2 and MG Midget
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That explains the economy! However you will have paid a considerable amount for the car and suffer high depreciation I expect,so no travel can be really economical.
What? You have to be joking!
I paid less for it than I would have paid for a new petrol Karoq, and currently the second hand value is increasing.

And it's MY car, not Urrell's.
 

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What? You have to be joking!
I paid less for it than I would have paid for a new petrol Karoq, and currently the second hand value is increasing.

And it's MY car, not Urrell's.
I can’t say I’ve ever seen a second hand car appreciate in value and become worth more than it was new.Hybrid or anything the value falls after being bought new as far as I know,
 

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Kia Niro HEV2 and MG Midget
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I can’t say I’ve ever seen a second hand car appreciate in value and become worth more than it was new.Hybrid or anything the value falls after being bought new as far as I know,
You don't get it, do you?
You stated I paid a considerable sum for my car; I didn't. I paid less than the cost of a new Karoq.
You stated I would be subject to high depreciation, I'm not. I never stated the car was worth more now than when I bought it.
If you really want to be pedantic I can quote you several examples of cars that have appreciated in value, after registration, normally due to their rarity. There has also been a thread on here showing the increasing part exchange values of Yeti's in the recent months.
 

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Yeti S+ 2010 2.0TDi CFHA 110 2WD Manual
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I can’t say I’ve ever seen a second hand car appreciate in value and become worth more than it was new.Hybrid or anything the value falls after being bought new as far as I know,
Clearly not been monitoring used car values over the last 12-months! :D
 
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I can’t say I’ve ever seen a second hand car appreciate in value and become worth more than it was new.Hybrid or anything the value falls after being bought new as far as I know,
Cap HPI has found nearly 50 six-month-old used cars with 5,000 on the clock are fetching higher prices than the list prices of like-for-like brand new versions.

Leading the data was Britain’s cheapest car.
 

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Any fuel additive is fare game for taxation as a fuel, even the likes of injector cleaner.

The only non taxed fuel (that's for road use) is vegetable oil / biodiesel and there's a 2500L per rolling 12 months limit on that, this is also per household, and you have to keep records to prove the amount used.
Not the brightest bunny in the field, are you saying I can run my diesel yeti on a mix of diesel and Morrison’s rapeseed oil?
 

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Many years ago, someone I know very well ran their Toyota Carina E on waste vegetable oil. It ran fine ... for about 6 months.
 

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Not the brightest bunny in the field, are you saying I can run my diesel yeti on a mix of diesel and Morrison’s rapeseed oil?
Yes and no.
Your Yeti would probably run on a mix of diesel and veg oil, however it's not something I'd recommend in a common rail engine.
I ran many cars on either used veg oil or home made biodiesel for almost 10 years, it's not without it's problems and even though I covered 100K in one of the cars I would say it's a long term option.
 

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Yeti S+ 2010 2.0TDi CFHA 110 2WD Manual
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Your Yeti would probably run on a mix of diesel and veg oil, however it's not something I'd recommend in a common rail engine.
That's why on most diesel Yetis I've ever checked, there is a sign inside the the fuel filler flap that says "NO BIO DIESEL" in a red circle. Recycled veg/frying oil in particular does not do well under the extreme pressures found in the injection systems of CR engines.

Older diesels, like VW's PD series or indirect injection Ricardo designs (older still) would run just fine - till the fuel delivery system eventually gummed up that is. In fact the more miles you did on bio in those, the better. Less chance for the bio part of the fuel to cultivate bacterial and fungal growths while parked up with fuel in the tank that had been there for weeks, absorbing water and condensation from inside the tank walls.
 

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That's why on most diesel Yetis I've ever checked, there is a sign inside the the fuel filler flap that says "NO BIO DIESEL" in a red circle. Recycled veg/frying oil in particular does not do well under the extreme pressures found in the injection systems of CR engines.

Older diesels, like VW's PD series or indirect injection Ricardo designs (older still) would run just fine - till the fuel delivery system eventually gummed up that is. In fact the more miles you did on bio in those, the better. Less chance for the bio part of the fuel to cultivate bacterial and fungal growths while parked up with fuel in the tank that had been there for weeks, absorbing water and condensation from inside the tank walls.
From my own experiences I completely agree.
In total I had 5 injection pumps fail (one common rail unit), when pulled apart they were all gummed up inside. Not something I want to be putting in my Yeti.
I did save a lot of money in that 10 years, I also learnt a lot about diesel engines / fuel systems and the process of making biodiesel and the equipment used (I built my own settling system, reactor, meth recovery, washing and drying tanks), and I made a lot of friends through forums and meetups.
 
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