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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there...peeps.

Having become a recent owner of a Yeti I have encountered two issues over the last few days. (2014 plate Greenline)..

1st....had to replace all brake pads as the car was sold to me with ~90% worn pads I now realised....£150 thank you please.
2nd EGR valve has failed (specialist independent V Dub garage) with a circa £900 bill looming.

The car did come with a 6 month warranty...i have had it just 3 months, and covered just under 2000 miles, so I am hoping to **** that the warranty will actually cover the second of these.

I bought it from a different place to where it is being repaired...but am a little miffed that firstly it was sold with such worn pads, and now this second issue (although as I understand it reading on here, 2014 cars may have had poorly designed valves, as other members have mentioned them being replaced).

If the EGR isn't covered then I will be particularly unhappy (and somewhat less solvent) - I will still have to fork out some even if it is covered as the warranty only covers a limited labour rate.

Comments/suggestions/sympathy welcomed!
 

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£900 for EGR replacement on a front drive Greenline sounds a bit steep, it's around the same price as a 2.0L TDI 4x4 and there's more stuff to remove on the 4x4.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
£900 for EGR replacement on a front drive Greenline sounds a bit steep, it's around the same price as a 2.0L TDI 4x4 and there's more stuff to remove on the 4x4.
I was a little shocked at that as well - I am crossing everything that the warranty will cover the bulk though. It was apparently a 5 hour job (whereas I have read on here it could/should be 2-3?) I can query...if it isnt covered, then not sure what to do.

At the end of the day I am a little stuck really. OH & I were/are supposed to be going on a short break on Thu to Cornwall with the dog to a friend's static caravan...1st holiday since covid.
 

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Personally I'd be checking the small print on the warranty to see if this is covered if the work is done at any garage, and then get a few more quotes.
I wouldn't be surprised if the price was inflated as they know it's a warranty claim, sorry but I have a deep distrust of garages.
 

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If you bought the car from a dealer, under consumer law he is responsible for any fault present or developing at the time of sale for six months. This is a legal obligation and overrules any shorter warranty that may have come with the car. It is also incumbent of the dealer to prove it was not present or developing at the time of sale, not for you to prove it was. If when you take it up with the dealer that sold you the car, he refuses to take any interest contact your local citizens advice bureaux.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
If you bought the car from a dealer, under consumer law he is responsible for any fault present or developing at the time of sale for six months. This is a legal obligation and overrules any shorter warranty that may have come with the car. It is also incumbent of the dealer to prove it was not present or developing at the time of sale, not for you to prove it was. If when you take it up with the dealer that sold you the car, he refuses to take any interest contact your local citizens advice bureaux.
That's a really helpful piece of advice. Thanks.

I had a call earlier informing me that he warranty will cover it, (Phew) but that the Labour charge cover isn't as much as the garage, so I still have to stump up £200. Clearly much better than 900.

I will be contacting the dealer as I have had to shell out £350 in 3 days because of them now.
 

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Why have you not used the dealer to get both done?
Why use a second garage when it is under warranty?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Mine was 40 miles away, but took it back with warranty fault.
Well the warranty is an insurance type effectively, so any garage can use it. Driving 80 miles in a car in limp mode (A roads not motorway as well wouldnt be sensible, nor time efficient)

As for the brakes...they clearly need to be done asap, andnot covered by warranty. However, they (IMHO) should not have sold the car with pads which needed replacing after 1500 miles, and I have just sent an email raising my concerns about this.
 

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Well the warranty is an insurance type effectively, so any garage can use it. Driving 80 miles in a car in limp mode (A roads not motorway as well wouldnt be sensible, nor time efficient)

As for the brakes...they clearly need to be done asap, andnot covered by warranty. However, they (IMHO) should not have sold the car with pads which needed replacing after 1500 miles, and I have just sent an email raising my concerns about this.
Ok, mine was covered by Skoda warranty.
 

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I've been looking into replacing the EGR on my 2wd Yeti and have spent a fair bit of time underneath the car working out the way to do it effectively. Access is difficult and working space restricted, but it looks to be reasonably straightforward for a garage that has done these before. The main issue is undoing bolts that are both difficult to reach and possibly seized - the EGR pipe to exhaust manifold and turbo oil feeds are the most likely ones to give trouble. The DPF can be undone form its brackets and moved just enough to give clearance for the two R.H. EGR retaining bolts and the 2 EGR pipe nuts. There may be a workaround regarding the oil feed pipes that does not involve removing them from the turbo. I just need a day without rain to carry out any work and take a really good look.

Before replacing the EGR though you have to be sure it actually is faulty and not a spurious error message. I removed the stepper motor from mine and it was easy to see what is wrong, as the quadrant gear will only move through a limited part of its intended range. A garage should be able to excercise the EGR valve with their diagnostic unit and compare the actual position with the requested one, so no removal required.

A Pierburg EGR is about £230 retail including delivery. Then there are gaskets and O rings. My thought is a well equipped garage should be able to do this in under 3 hours, but you only have to get one broken or damaged bolt for this to turn into a real grind that could be a lengthy and involved job. There's no possibility of drilling out or anything else in-situ if there's a problem - the bolts have to come out cleanly. To me, that's the main concern about being able to complete the job.
 

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Before replacing the EGR though you have to be sure it actually is faulty and not a spurious error message. I removed the stepper motor from mine and it was easy to see what is wrong, as the quadrant gear will only move through a limited part of its intended range. A garage should be able to excercise the EGR valve with their diagnostic unit and compare the actual position with the requested one, so no removal required.
The most likely reason why the actuator quadrant has limited movement, is that the valve flap on its shaft inside the venturi, and hence out of sight, is physically blocked by accumulated soot. Preventing it’s full degree of angular rotation. I’ve seen a boxful of EGR valves removed from various cars (of all makes). At the workshop where I get my cars MoT’d. The sheer quantity of soot caked to the interior of several of them was amazing. Most had the internal diameter reduced by up to half the original. The most amazing thing was that any of the valves continued to work at all, prior to returning a fault code from the actuator. In theory, they could be cleaned. Just like the throttle bodies on the front of the engine intake. Then would quite likely be good for a further umpteen thousand miles. Having removed the valve at a garage though, the cost of paying a garage mechanic to clean a unit, is way more than the cost of a new unit. Therefore for most owners the answer is a new unit, as you have costed.

In the longer term, prevention is better than cure. Either the software can be modified to “delete” the EGR functionality. On grounds that if the valve is never commanded to move, it can’t return a lack of movement fault. Or, fuel additive that reduces the soot output at source and contains components that survive combustion to help reduce soot build up inside the EGR system. I’ve used Archoil AR6900 D-Max for 3-4 years now, with nearly every tankful of (supermarket) fuel. At last week’s MoT, the Yeti was first in on the Monday morning. Initially the tester thought the emissions probe may have developed a fault over the weekend. So he brought his own car over to check its emissions while its own engine was still warm from his commute to work. The probe and emissions machine were working fine on his car. The Yeti however recorded a big fat 0.00 for the second year in succession. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Bit of an update....

Looks like the car will be ready tomorrow, and after an email explaining how annoyed I was, it looks as though the place where i bought the car from will offer to cover some of the shortfall in the warranty cover (think excess on insurance).

Sadly the worn brake pads have been thrown away so i can't fairly show they were practically worn out when i got the car.

@Flintstone - The Archoil you suggest - I assume that is similar/better to Redex which I remember my dad using when i was little. I havent heard of it before, but seems to be reviewed favourably.
 

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Redex of old “upper cylinder lubricant”, is a completely different product. Was very good at keeping piston rings free of deposits though, and when used "neat" into a carburettor intake for short periods was also good at giving a petrol engines a sort of instant de-coke. So I guess it was doing a similar job in some ways.

The Redex company do offer modern equivalent fuel additives for both petrol and diesels, that claim to do much the same things as Archoil. As found on the shelves at Halfords, etc. I know nothing of the substance or science behind those claims however.

STP also do very similar products at retail outlets. STP being an American based company that started out doing oil improvement additives in the 1950s. (Stands for "Scientifically Treated Petroleum"). Again I have no personal experience with modern STP products.

I do know of another with a name like “D2” that is about as effective as a chocolate teapot? Looks good. Not much help in practice?

Archoil has some proper science behind its (patented?) products though. And is the only other one I do have own experience of using successfully.
 

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The Yeti EGR has two mechanisms - a vacuum operated flap and also a stepper motor under control of the ECU that operates a piston valve. There's a plastic quadrant gear that moves a sickle cam on the back side of the EGR and the cam has a small ball race that is pinned through the end of the piston valve and locates in the cam. A common failure relates to the bearing/cam operation - the bearing can seize or there's another problem with the pin falling out. Also wear in this area causes lost movement and an incorrect position signal being returned. A new bearing and pin (tack welded to keep it in place) can be a fix, but at the same time it would probably be wise to clean out the EGR including the cooler passages and lubricate the flap and piston. Once the mechanical side of things is sorted out the EGR can be repaired on the car if the gears or stepper motor need to be replaced at some future date.

I have a reservation about an EGR delete - a number of reputable sources say it's needed as part of the DPF regeneration process as well as acts to control the inlet charge temperature. As my car now has a moderately high mileage I want to preserve the DPF for as long as possible before I have to clean it. At the moment I'm getting 400+ miles between regens.

This is the only car I've owned where physically cleaning the EGR is a real problem - I've never given it a second thought in the past and just scraped out the excess buildup and used carb cleaner to remove the rest. At most all I've needed is a gasket or two.
 

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Mickleyluv.
Just discovered the attached - may help?
 

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That's pretty much what I'd discovered form peering underneath the car, except they remove the DPF to give clearance. I did consider this but it requires driveshaft and sub-frame removal. The benefit would be to do a reverse-flush ash clean on the DPF while it's off the car, but maybe that's for another time. I managed to soak all of the fastners with ATF/acetone and crack them all, so I now know everything will come apart. It's possible to do the job without removing the battery and inlet assembly, but I wonder if it's actually quicker that way in the end.
 

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One question that I can't find an answer to is whether the new EGR has to be coded into the ECU after fitting. There's a technical note from Pierburg saying it must be done and I noticed the same warning on a label stuck to a remanufactured unit. The only reference I can find though (on the VCDS forum) relates to petrol engines. If this is required for diesel cars, what is the procedure?
 
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