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Discussion Starter #1
The Yeti is poorly!





Driving along yesterday going nowhere in a hurry and the coil light on the dash comes on and the message of dread go to workshop appeared and the car goes into limp mode. Turned round and went home (only about a mile) and stopped the engine and restarted - still the same wouldn't rev above 2500 rpm. phoned the dealer I bought it from last October who gave me an extension on the warranty when I bought it as the 3 year warranty ran out in March and he siad that it is an extension of the Skoda warranty and that I could take it to any Skoda repairer so off we go to the local one in Banbury (Listers). They looked at it yesterday and said that it is the EGR valve blocked, they need to order parts and I should have it back by Tuesday assuming that the parts turn up on time etc. They lent me a Polo in the meantime.




So far so good, service that you would hope for so we wait with baited breath until Tuesday.




They said this is not a very common fault, can be caused by just tootling around town a lot but when I said that I went to Spain and back in April and sat on the motorways for hours on end at 80 mph they thought that it probably wasn't the cause in this case. It's only done 43k miles of which I have done 7k since end October last year.

Has anybody else had this problem?
 

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I hope the Yeti gets well soon, I'm sure all will go well.
Thanks for describing the limp mode situation, I now have an idea of what happens, should it happen.
All the best, Rob.
 

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I had a look in ETKA and your model motor has had a couple of EGR updated parts since 2010 requiring revised part numbers. Once in Jan 2011 and again in Sep 2011. Looks like you may have got an "iffy" part pre-update. Hopefully they have all the bugs sorted now and you'll be back on the road again in no time.



Edited by: plbxr
 

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As an addendum to my previous response, I seem to remember reading in some forums that early VW Golf models had an issue with blocked EGR valves. I think it was related to using engine oils that were not up to VW-504/507 spec but I'm not sure. I hope your garage has done the right thing for you at service time. Mistakenly putting in an inappropriate oil might cause a big sludge problem with variable service intervals.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Update


Got the yeti back close of play yesterday. They replaced the EGR valve, the cooler and the pipework and a software upgrade for EGR control. They also found and replaced a drive shaft joint on the rear at the same time. It all seems ok but I have only driven a couple of miles at the moment.

The bill to the warranty company (Skoda extended warranty) is £1100 plus VAT and they use special labour rates for them so it would probably have cost me around £1.5k. Makes you think about extended warranties.

All in all it was not a bad experience with the dealer looking after me well I felt. so although sh*t happens somebody cared enough to make the right effort to put it right and they are only about 2 miles from my door so even better.




Lets hope that is all because she is off to Spain again at the end of July so another 4000 miles or so in a month.
 

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Good result that the extended warranty paid for itself in one go, and you have had good service from your dealer, hope your monster has a good trip and behaves as it should
 

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An excellent result, especially fixing the drive shaft problem that you weren't aware of.
 

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Have had the EGR valve replaced on my VW Touran diesel at around 100k miles. I do not think it is a common problem but things do tend to fail occasionally.

Vandeman
 

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Had the same problem 2 days ago. Dealer says 6 hours work minimum and approx £1000. Sadly out of warranty and no extra cover. Should this be failing on a five year old car at 75k miles ??
I do2 hourmotorway drive every 2 weeks or so and plenty of medium journeys in between.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I have done about 45k since having mine done. It was covered by the extended warranty but the price seems about right. I also do a fair amount of motorway driving usually at 70 ish or 80 ish in France and Spain. My theory is that with that sort of driving it should stay clean but the jury is still out on that. What sort of speed do you cruise at on motorways? I don't think that you do a diesel engine any favours by not working it hard. I worked with big engines (up to around 3000 bhp) for 15 years so I have a bit of experience in that field.
 

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From what I've seen on most cars, the egr only opens below 2000 rpm, and is fully closed by about 2500 rpm, so as stated, working it hard actually prevents soot getting into the egr system.
 

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Hello,
75000 kms and3 1/2 years old here. Same EGR valve problem last week. Valve costs around EUR 400,00 and half a day of work minimum. So that's about EUR 800,00 at least. Had it done. Dealer did NOT count the price of the valve and only half of the working hours altough the car was out of warranty. Here in Belgium the Skoda dealers are very 'large' as service pricing is considered. Quite happy about te cost, but the same evening I got a cooling fluid shortage alarm (red thermometer). Seems like they had worked a bit quickly and not testdrived to get the cooling fluid distributed into the system => result: air bulb in the system that resolved only after I drove some dozens of kilometers and then: PING!!! Happy again, because over here, when you have your SKODA serviced (at least once a year) with an official dealership, there is a free travel insurance (with 'Vlaamse Automobilisten Bond') wich provides a serviceman coming at home (or wherever the car is), helping you out or taking the car to the workshop + 3 days a free replacement car. Quite nice. After that it ran fine for a couple of days, but monday morning made a **** of a noise at the exhaust pipe. I tought: "not again", but is was a false alert: seems I had picked up a piece of wood between the chassis and the exhaust pipe; they picked it out and the troubles were gone.
 

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Interesting! Last week our Yeti* had the glow plug coil light come on, followed a day later by flashing coil and semi-limp mode, not pulling beyond 2500, etc. As described above. A fault code check at the local independent Skoda specialist dealer said EGR fault, but recommendation was carry on using, we'll book it in next Tuesday for an EGR clean.
So SWMBO and eldest daughter take Yeti from Yorkshire down to Cambridge (3+ hrs of 98% Mway or dual). Still in semi-limp, so journey actually took 5 hrs with regular stops, and them phoning me with updates on symptoms. Half way there, the glow plug coil light was joined by the engine fault light on continuous. But still they persevered.

2 days parked up in Cambs. then we swap cars and I take over the Yeti while SWMBO and Dtr take the Beemer home (in under 3hrs, so they weren't hanging about!). So I then chuck 25 litres of Shell regular diesel in the tank to see me home. After about 20 miles of A14 and A1 the glow plug coil light goes out, leaving just the engine ECU symbol lit and near full performance, although I wasn't pushing, just in case. A burger stop at Grantham (well it was 9pm and I was hungry!) then on re-start all lights are out and full performance available. Drive home takes 3 hrs not counting the burger!

Appt at garage on Tues a.m. reveals all faults cleared and not recurring. Hence no action necessary.

A little recent historychecking reveals that a couple of days before the first warning light appeared, SWMBO had filled with regular diesel from a non-local outlet of Morrisons. Garage reckons that is 20% bio-diesel. Can anyone confirm? Normally webuy fuel from either Sainsbury or Shell, depending on which driving nearest at the time. So on leaving the Skoda Man, I fill Yeti up with 39 litres of Shell V-power Nitro to givefuel system a good clean through in theory. Since then Yeti has been running like the proverbial train.

Does all this fuel differencehave a bearing on the temporary EGR fault? Or could it be coincidence? Experiences of other forum members welcome!

Either way - current theory is that one tank of V-power diesel in every five or six, plus staying clear of Morrisons fuel (Skoda Man also says ASDA is a similar blend?). Till events like a recurrence of the problem prove otherwise.May be a lot cheaper "therapy" than a new EGR.

I habitually do the 1 in 5 V-powerfor the Beemer in our life (2002 E46 330d Sport, 184bhp version), as that seems to keep things sweet. But that is old enough not to have a DPF (but does have EGR, etc.). Although it does get the occasional tank of Morrisons fuel, but has never complained in 2.5 years. I guess different engines can bemore or less susceptible to bio-fuel percentage in the blend? And maybe what the particular bio-fuel is derived from? But what do people think who really know about these things?

Incidentally, why is a new EGR so expensive to fit on the Yeti, as reported earlier in this thread? Is it such a difficult location to reach? I've cleaned the Beemer's EGR a couple of times, while doing other service jobs, just as a precautionary job. But like many other DIY service jobs on the Beemers I have owned, that is a doddle to do as is very accessible. Takes all of about 20 minutes in total.

* 2010 CR110 diesel on 117,000 miles. Regularly service by dealer up to 3 yrs and 78,000. Then oil and filter changes by me every 9000 miles since then,using Castrol Edge FST 5w30 to VW507 spec. Plus other services at appropriate intervals. Typical daily journey pattern is 8 miles each way commute on rural main roads with little traffic. Plus regular longer Mway trips of 1.5 hrs plus each way on a typical weekend, etc.
 

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I wonder how many egr and other problems are caused by supermarket fuel ? I have done an egr bypass on a previous car , as I don't see the sense in puting exhaust gases into an engine, they say its to use non burnt fuel. How does the engine know what's burnt and what's not ? I don't think you can bypass the egr on the Yeti- well ! not completely .
 

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Interesting. Thanks Henry.

Morrisons fuel is not 20% Bio, but the same 5% as everyone else. However they do seem to have more problems reported than the other supermarkets.

Isn't the EGR on the Yeti watercooled? On my old Freelander I just disconnected the actuating vacuum pipe.
 

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Llanigraham said:
Morrisons fuel is not 20% Bio, but the same 5% as everyone else. However they do seem to have more problems reported than the other supermarkets.
A while back Morrisons was probably the best you could get, petrol was Texaco Clean System 3
I wonder where they get their supply from now or will it be wherever is cheapest at the time.
It does have to meet BS.

This is from the Express Personal Finance News

REVEALED: The best supermarket to go to if you REALLY want to save money on fuel

SUPERMARKETS now sell more than half the petrol and diesel bought in the UK. Tesco, Sainsbury's, Asda and Morrisons all sell their own fuel at superstores.

But do you actually save any money buying your fuel at the supermarket compared to filling up at Shell, Esso or any other 'normal' petrol station?

You might be surprised to learn that the petrol you buy at the supermarkets is NOT the same as the fuel you would buy from other garages.

In fact, as many petrol heads will tell you, the difference in quality is so great some would rather pay extra than EVER put supermarket fuel in their tanks. But are they right?

In a word, no. All UK fuel must meet British and European standards - EN228 for unleaded and for diesel EN590.

Fuel companies do often add a cocktail of additives to boost performance, but this is really where the difference starts and ends.

For this minimal privilege, you will pay a hefty premium. And fuel, at its basic level, is generally the same in terms of performance whereever you buy it.

So the most important thing you need to know IS where you can find the best deal. For the latest fuel prices in your area check out mySupermarket.co.uk

YES...BUT WHICH SUPERMARKET SHOULD I BUY MY FUEL FROM?

Tesco
Tesco have launched a new scheme which they claim is an industry first: TescoClubcard Fuel Save. This links your shopping spend in store directly to the pumps by giving customers 2p off a litre of fuel for every £50
spent in store. So a family spending £300 get a whopping 12p off, per litre, per month.

Asda
Asda do like to shout about low low prices. They've launched their Fuel Price Checker which is on the front of their clever mobile app, This will automatically display details of your nearest Asda store wherever you are in the country and show you the most recent fuel prices. But it doesn't give you any money off.

Sainsbury's
Sainsbury's really don't like gimmicks and they don't currently have anything special to say about their fuel prices. But, of course as with all things Sainsbury's you can collect Nectar points when you spend in store
or at the pumps, collect 1 Nectar point for every 1 litre of fuel purchased at Sainsbury's.

Morrisons
The Morrisons Fuel Saver scheme works by families using gift cards bought in Morrisons to pay for purchases on the high street. Customers pick up the cards during their weekly shop, they receive a voucher which gives
them money off fuel: 1p-a-litre for every £10 they spend when they next fill up, They then use their gift cards like cash to pay for their shopping on the high street

THE VERDICT:
Asda and Sainsbury's simply don't do much to incentivise you to buy fuel at their forecourts.

Morrisons will give you a very chunky discount, but you need a PhD in Applied Retail Marketing just to understand how the Morrison's Fuel Saver scheme actually works.

The clear winner is TESCO.

They have the best thought-out and simplest reward scheme by far.

It offers meaningful savings, especially when combined with their consistently competitive fuel prices.
 

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Since the nearest supermarket to me is a round trip of 36 miles, plus I refuse point blank to use Tesco's for anything, I shall continue to buy my fuel from the local Texaco, even if it is 1.5p more expensive.Even when we do go to a bigger place I refuse to buy supermarket fuel.
 

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Mine runs on Tesco diesel, 42000 miles and so far so good. I have tried the expensive brands V power etc, and if anything, it seems happier with Tesco diesel.
 
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