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Discussion Starter #1
Hello! I am not a car person but when the light came on about half an hour after a sloppy refill of the oil chamber (not overfilled, but there was spillage from a 5 litre container as it 'burped' and this splashed, I had to start figuring out the problem. I have read here that it could be caused by a gunked up throttle. I drive a petrol (gas not diesel), ten year-old Yeti. I hope that's all it is. Ideas? Is this plausible?
 

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Hi Jo- welcome to the forum :)

Trouble with the dashboard lamps is that they cover a multitude of errors so diagnosing from one lamp is difficult. Any possibility you can get an OBD2 (Onboard Diagnostics) reader which will give the actaul error codes that are more specific?

Were you just topping up the oil or had drained and refilling? Any particular reason for this?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I am learning... No, I have no OBD2, and wonder about getting one. Back to the main point. Foolishly, I was refilling about a litre's worth ( the correct oil type ), splashed a bit, and drove a bit on rather flat road, before remembering I hadn't closed the oil chamber (- yes, I know, it just happened...), so there was some oil as if lightly sprinkled, a bit heavier behind the oil opening. The oil just needed topping up, oil light had shown up. I am wondering if the exhaust system light is not really connected to the oil, however. Maybe it was connected to a light grinding sound that I sometimes hear when I change from 0 to first gear. Which I can control depending on how I press the accelerator. It is not a clutch issue. So if this sound is a symptom of weakening-throttle-like behaviour, then the problem may just be to change the trottle. I wonder about OBD2 stuff. And what the code for "change the throttle" would be. This I write as a journalist open to admitting ignorance, such as now. Thank you for the questions and interest. I love the car and am sad it has been discontinued. Before this, I drove the Citroen Berlingo with a textile, roll-back roof and they discontinued that one too.
 

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I cannot see how oil on the outside of engine would bring up a fault light.
How much oil did it take to top up after noticing that the filler cap was not fitted?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I cannot see how oil on the outside of engine would bring up a fault light.
How much oil did it take to top up after noticing that the filler cap was not fitted?
Hi - thank you SnowGood and Urrell.
I had filled it to about upper-mid 'B' level on the stick, definitely did not overfill it, but it doesn't take much oil to look like it's all over. I didn't have to add more later. So this is why I wonder now if in fact the problem is the throttle itself. And if the oil business was only coincidental timing, or the feather that broke the camel's back. The more one reads... If only there were a bank of sounds that one could tap into to check with the sounds the car makes when something is off or about to break.
 

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What makes you think its a throttle problem?
Can you confirm the oil light came on because of a low oil level?
What size engine is it?
 

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Could the "light" Jo is saying, may have been caused by the filler cap being loose and a lack of oil pressure?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you, Urrell and Dutchman. The throttle idea was because of somethng read (here?) when I was looking for the reason the exhaust system light went on. Someone else‘s problem at the time. About oil pressure: if it dropping can trigger that particular warning light, I wasn‘t able to „reset“ the light not to show once the cap was put back and the car had overnight to sleep on it. Also, it has never come on like this ever, before, and so not when the oil-level lamp has come on either. The light came on only after I had put a fresh litre of oil in the car and driven about 7 kms with the oil cap off ( including an hour of parking in the middle of that distance).
 

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The exhaust system light was most likely due to out of range readings from the lambda sensor(s) in the exhaust system. The Positive Crancase Ventilation (PCV) takes air/fumes from the crankcase into the engine air inlet just after the air mass meter and this volume of air/fumes is not measured. With the oil filler cap left off a large volume of air is able to go in the oil filler hole, through the PCV system and into the engine air intake. This large volume by-passes the air mass meter and so the air/fuel mixture is wrong and you get the warning light.

The problem here was not low oil pressure, topping up the oil level or spilling some oil - it was driving after leaving the filler cap off.
If you can get a scan for fault codes done I would expect to find one or more for the lambda sensor readings.

The low oil pressure light is RED.

Waiting for the oil level light to come on before topping up with oil is unwise. What if the light fails? More regular oil level checking is a better way to go, just make sure to replace the dip stick and filler cap properly!! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Thank you for the detail Bryetian. Also, this is the first time I have attempted to understand the car‘s motor, and am very grateful for this group! It is a manual by the way.
 

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Lets see if we can drag this out, is it a 1.2 - 1.4 - or 1.8 petrol engine?
 

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Thank you for the detail Bryetian. If the lambda sensor reading issue is the case, what is the remedy? Also, this is the first time I have attempted to understand the car‘s motor, and am very grateful for this group! It is a manual by the way.
Please note that I have edited my original post as there was an error in it. It would be helpful if you would delete your post that simply quotes mine.

Remedy? If you mean that the warning light is still on, then it will probably need a diagnostic system capable of deleting fault codes to reset the light.
 

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Maybe it was connected to a light grinding sound that I sometimes hear when I change from 0 to first gear. Which I can control depending on how I press the accelerator.
Could this noise be described as a whistling or hissing noise? Does it happen when the engine is idling? Does the noise happen just AFTER the engine is switched off?
 

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Maybe it was connected to a light grinding sound that I sometimes hear when I change from 0 to first gear.
That sounds like worn syncromesh to me.
 

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... If only there were a bank of sounds that one could tap into to check with the sounds the car makes when something is off or about to break.
There is, of a sort, but not for sounds. One or more dash lights comes on to tell you a sensor reading somewhere is off or giving an out of range reading. Interrogating the fault codes then tells you what sensor the computers think may be giving the bad reading. That gives a clue, but the bad reading may still be a symptom, rather than the cause of the problem.

For example 1 - when I was replacing the inlet manifold on my previous BMW, I accidentally switched the systems onto check, while the wiring loom to the injectors was still disconnected. That produced an engine fault light on the dash and a raft of about 20 different fault codes, all relating to the fuel injection. Once the wiring was replaced properly and the codes cleared, everything was fine.

For example 2 - Last year the Yeti developed a fault light. The code reader said that was a code that translated to to bad reading from the air intake air mass sensor. It turned out however that the sensor itself was fine, and giving “good” readings. The fault was inside the box that houses the Engine Control Unit computer, where a broken connection was resulting in no signal from the air mass sensor reaching the computer. Took an auto electrical specialist and sending the ECU away to be repaired to fix that, a little under £500 when everything added up.

Basic fault code readers that just plug into the car’s OBD port, cost under €10 (from places like Aldi when on one of their centre aisle specials, or from Amazon marketplace or EBay).
The “bank” of what those codes translate to is then called “Google”. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Could this noise be described as a whistling or hissing noise? Does it happen when the engine is idling? Does the noise happen just AFTER the engine is switched off?
None of the above. It is closer to what you hear for a moment when the dentist is using something like a grinding tool on yozr own tooth. The clutch is wearing and will beed replacement, but I feel that‘s not it.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
There is, of a sort, but not for sounds. One or more dash lights comes on to tell you a sensor reading somewhere is off or giving an out of range reading. Interrogating the fault codes then tells you what sensor the computers think may be giving the bad reading. That gives a clue, but the bad reading may still be a symptom, rather than the cause of the problem.

For example 1 - when I was replacing the inlet manifold on my previous BMW, I accidentally switched the systems onto check, while the wiring loom to the injectors was still disconnected. That produced an engine fault light on the dash and a raft of about 20 different fault codes, all relating to the fuel injection. Once the wiring was replaced properly and the codes cleared, everything was fine.

For example 2 - Last year the Yeti developed a fault light. The code reader said that was a code that translated to to bad reading from the air intake air mass sensor. It turned out however that the sensor itself was fine, and giving “good” readings. The fault was inside the box that houses the Engine Control Unit computer, where a broken connection was resulting in no signal from the air mass sensor reaching the computer. Took an auto electrical specialist and sending the ECU away to be repaired to fix that, a little under £500 when everything added up.

Basic fault code readers that just plug into the car’s OBD port, cost under €10 (from places like Aldi when on one of their centre aisle specials, or from Amazon marketplace or EBay).
The “bank” of what those codes translate to is then called “Google”. :)
I love learning all this. Thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Please note that I have edited my original post as there was an error in it. It would be helpful if you would delete your post that simply quotes mine.

Remedy? If you mean that the warning light is still on, then it will probably need a diagnostic system capable of deleting fault codes to reset the light.
Will do.
 
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