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Almost certain something is wrong with it.
I drive mainly twisty roads and with roof bars on.
Sticks to the road like glue even hard into and out of corners.
Me too. I drive a notorious stretch of the A75 with a series of very nasty bends in quick succession. My Yeti whips round like it's on rails.

Mind you, when I first got it, the ride felt awfully rough and going round those bends, I felt the handling was odd.

I had my alignment and suspension checked. Both fine so I took a punt on it being the tyres, which were all virtually new but cheap and mismatched. Blokes in the garage looked at me like I was nuts discarding new tyres but £550 later (Vector 4s), I have no regrets.

Like driving a different car. Take the same bends at 45-50 with way more confidence than I had at 35 on old tyres.
 

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2016, Yeti SE L, 1.2 dsg. Quartz Grey, black roof, Gobi Sand
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Hankook Ventus S1 evo2 K117. I paid for 2. Dealer paid for 2. Transformational? - Yes! Definitely and markedly.
Not my first choice. That would have been Kumho Ecsta HS51. Dealer could source the Hankooks but not the Kumhos though. So a compromise was struck. They'll do fine for now as summer tyres.
Actually they are off the car already and into my winter store shed, till next spring. My existing 16" wheels with Toyo Snowpro winter tyres are on the car, ready for the coming wet and cold conditions.

Regarding the Falkens - there are Falkens and then there are Falkens. the different ranges are not all the same by any means. E.G.
Falken Sincera = economy
Falken Ziex = mid range
Falken Azenis = performance
Different horses for different courses? You pays your money and takes your pick.
Apart from that I'd agree with Graham.

P.S. Still wondering why you would reduce the tyre pressures for UK winter levels of cold on tarmac at least? What's the logic there? Have I missed something?
I was increasing the pressure, to compensate for the cooler weather forecasted.

I checked the data label on the fuel flap, for light load 2.1 bar front and rear. Felt a bit soft to be honest. Friday was ‘warm’ and in anticipation of cooler weather from Sunday, 4c, I put a bit extra in, to compensate for the cooler temperatures. As arctic temps heading this way will check again and try a couple of extra psi.

Not interested in any model of Falkens, Hankook. Nexan probably give a miss, though lots of main dealers using them - cheap. Buy cheap, buy twice - which is why my car, currently, doesn’t handle as well as it could.

Lots of varied information on tyre pressures, diesel 4wd heavier car than 1.2 tsi, makes sense for differences there, one source had 1.2 with higher pressures than diesel?

Can’t ever imagine a Yeti handling like a go kart, my mk2 golf Giti did, and a yeti is not set up anything like that beast. Besides, if I’d wanted a go kart handling vehicle, that’s what I’d have got.

It’s a Yeti, not a go kart and handles nothing like one. Other than that, it’s got lots of positives but will benefit from a decent set of tyres on it.
 

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I was increasing the pressure, to compensate for the cooler weather forecasted.

I checked the data label on the fuel flap, for light load 2.1 bar front and rear. Felt a bit soft to be honest. Friday was ‘warm’ and in anticipation of cooler weather from Sunday, 4c, I put a bit extra in, to compensate for the cooler temperatures. As arctic temps heading this way will check again and try a couple of extra psi.

Not interested in any model of Falkens, Hankook. Nexan probably give a miss, though lots of main dealers using them - cheap. Buy cheap, buy twice - which is why my car, currently, doesn’t handle as well as it could.

Lots of varied information on tyre pressures, diesel 4wd heavier car than 1.2 tsi, makes sense for differences there, one source had 1.2 with higher pressures than diesel?

Can’t ever imagine a Yeti handling like a go kart, my mk2 golf Giti did, and a yeti is not set up anything like that beast. Besides, if I’d wanted a go kart handling vehicle, that’s what I’d have got.

It’s a Yeti, not a go kart and handles nothing like one. Other than that, it’s got lots of positives but will benefit from a decent set of tyres on it.
Each to there own with tyres, i had Pirellis on mine when i bought it at 18,000 miles, the dealer replaced the front 2 with a cheap brand as they were nearly down to the limit.
I would not buy Piriellis
 

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Kia Niro HEV2 and MG Midget
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Reading that from the OP above, it strikes me he is confused as he definitely said he was REDUCING the tyre pressures because fitness winter.

I'm sorry but having owned Yetis for more than 10 years they do handle very well, often surprising and embarrassing owners of more sporting vehicles. Most of us can testify to that!

And as for his views on tyre manufacturers, then he is very much not up to date with what is now produced. I'm another member who wouldn't touch Pirelli 's having had them on my last Yeti and their handling and longevity was rubbish.
 

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Over this month i have gone from 225/50/17 Michelin Primacy to 215/60/16 Michelin Alpin and it handles really well on both, with the 16 inch being my preffered set as they soak up bumps much better with the extra sidewall.
 

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2016, Yeti SE L, 1.2 dsg. Quartz Grey, black roof, Gobi Sand
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Reading that from the OP above, it strikes me he is confused as he definitely said he was REDUCING the tyre pressures because fitness winter.

I'm sorry but having owned Yetis for more than 10 years they do handle very well, often surprising and embarrassing owners of more sporting vehicles. Most of us can testify to that!

And as for his views on tyre manufacturers, then he is very much not up to date with what is now produced. I'm another member who wouldn't touch Pirelli 's having had them on my last Yeti and their handling and longevity was rubbish.
I increased the pressures. In anticipation for the cold weather, why would I decrease them? As pressure is relative to temperature, or it was when I went to school.

I wouldn’t have a free set of Pirelli’s, did I mention them - no. Now, Avon’s I did, used them for 15 years. Seat Leon Cupra and RR - two different beasts but handling both impressive. A good tyre with strong walls.

Each to their own, clearly some fans of cheap tyres, I’ll have 4 second hand ones if anyone want them, really cheap.

Aside from the negative comments, thanks for the constructive views. 😀
 

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I increased the pressures. In anticipation for the cold weather, why would I decrease them? As pressure is relative to temperature, or it was when I went to school.
Aside from the negative comments, thanks for the constructive views. 😀
The copy and paste below is where you gave the impression of lowering your pressures. If 34 front and 32 rear is an increase no wonder it does not handle properly.

Rectangle Water Font Writing Paper
 

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2016, Yeti SE L, 1.2 dsg. Quartz Grey, black roof, Gobi Sand
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As it handles rubbish, with tyres inflated to manufacturers spec’, what is the consensus for 225/50/17 tyres, petrol 2wd?

What is the ‘sweet spot’ for go cart handling? PSI or bar, does anyone know?
 

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As long as you're somewhere close to the manufacturer's recommendations, then I don't think the tyre pressures will be the main cause of your problems.

It is fairly obvious you suspect the tyres themselves could be a contributing factor. There's not much you can do about that other than trying some alternative tyres.

Everybody's standards are different, but I would not describe any VW product I have ever driven as being soft or wallowy, and our Yeti is no exception.
So personally I suspect the real issue lies in the suspension.

Take a closer look at your springs, dampers and anti-roll bars.
Just bouncing on each corner of your car with your body weight should show if you have damper issues.
 

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2015 Elegance Greenline II
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What is the ‘sweet spot’ for go cart handling? PSI or bar, does anyone know?
A go cart on a go cart track, I thought we were talking about an SUV with excellent handling and good comfort here.
 

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Yeti Outdoor 2017 SE L 2.0TDi 150 4x4 Manual
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Take it the information on the fuel flap is incorrect?
Nope! The manufacturer recommendations inside the fuel flap cover a wide range of load scenarios and driver handling preferences. Right up to 2.9 bar / 42 psi. The 34/32 psi you quoted as having (increased?) your car's tyres to, are the absolute minimums for the lightest loadings and softest ride/handling compromise. Those may well not suit all driver preferences.

Tyre pressures are not a "one size (or pressure) fits all" type of recommendation.

What is the ‘sweet spot’ for less compromised handling? PSI or bar, does anyone know?
I refer back to #13 from 4 days ago. have you tried those? Or even 38 psi? The latter may result in rear passenger complaints mind?

Please tell us if you have yet followed up the numerous recommendations to check the springs, particularly the lowest coils hidden within the front or rear spring pans? (Those are prone to failure on most cars, not just Yetis). Plus suspension bushes all round. Drop links and anti roll bar mountings? As most recently suggested by Cubes in #30.
 

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2016, Yeti SE L, 1.2 dsg. Quartz Grey, black roof, Gobi Sand
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The car sailed through its MOT (Skoda Garage) on the 2nd November. I had all the wheels off on the 10th to clean and polish the inside of the rims. Before refitting, visually checked the springs and cleaned. Nothing wrong with the suspension/steering, plus it’s only got 35000 miles on it.

Topped all the tyres up to 36 psi - huge difference now, for the better.

Not rushing to National Tyres for Avon ZV7’s just yet, but that’s what will be going on. 7.5% off at the moment ££😀
 
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