Yeti Owners Club banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
385 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
A bottle of wine that costs five pounds on offer at the supermarket usually gives me a hangover. However a more expensive wine, the sort that's suitable to give as a gift to someone you like doesn't. Another headscratcher is ale. We've got pale ale and light ale, both very nice but is there a difference?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
422 Posts
I assume "Pale" means pale in colour; while "Light" means light on alcohol, i.e. lower alcohol content.... unless someone knows different
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,784 Posts
With a £5 bottle of wine, the actual cost of the wine inside is around 50p.

With a £10 bottle of wine, the cost of the bottle, labelling, transport, warehousing, etc. has stayed the same. But the wine inside can now be of a quality that costs £5.50. So the quality of the wine inside has just increased by a factor of 9.

With a £20 bottle of wine, the wine inside can now be of value up to £15.50.

You get where this is going? Not invariably true. As some producers will pass off 50p wine at £20 / bottle. But not if they want to stay in business for longer than a year.

With ales - does it matter? The joy is in exploring the differences? Just like single malt Whisky and whiskeys. Pale ale, IPA, or Indian Pale Ale to give it’s full title, was developed during the Raj. As a product with a shelf life that would survive being shipped from UK to India. Personally, I tend to prefer darker ales, like Riggwelter, but usually stop short of a porter. Among lagers, the real Czech Budweiser to the American copy. But the latter does come in nice 330ml cans#. Then there’s the wonderful world of ciders. Which now it’s been mentioned, shall I choose Thatchers or Koppaberg red fruits tonight? Mmmmmmmm?

# which reminds me of early autumn 1975 and an incident as a 21-year old in Sacramento, California. I had a 5-hour lay over between Greyhound busses. So went off to explore the city centre. Feeling peckish on a lovely sunny day, I purchased some bread and fillings from a convenience store, to make my own sandwiches, along with a 4-pack of buds. Finding a convenient park bench, I proceeded to sit and make myself lunch, whilst enjoying the autumn sun. I was half way through my second round of bread and filling, and washing it down with a single can of bud I had taken from my back pack. When a motorcycle cop in uniform and helmet walks up, having left his Harley about 30ft away, by the roadside. Then proceeds to glare at me, as I calmly take another sip from the can to wash down the last crust.
“What d’ya think you’re doin’?”
“Just eating my lunch Officer”.
“I’m about to arrest you for a public violation. Got anything to say for yourself?”.
“Pardon me Officer, but what for?”.
“Are you English?”
“Yes Sir!”
“You got ID?” I show him my passport.
“Good job you’re 21 at least” (I already knew you have to be 21 to buy alcohol in California, as shops and bars had challenged me for ID before. Although at the time, it was legal to buy limited quantities of cannabis from age 16 or 17).
The Officer then takes the half empty can from my hand, pours the remaining contents onto the grass. Then hands the empty can back to me.
“I guess you didn’t know that in California it’s illegal to consume alcohol in public”.
Gulp. “No Sir, I didn’t. But I do now!”
“What ya doin’ here anyway?”
“Just enjoying some legendary California sunshine, before taking a Greyhound up to Seattle.”
“Let me see your ticket.” I show him my “Ameripass” book of blank tickets with 10 days worth still to go from a 30-day pass.
“OK. Next time son, keep it outta sight.”
“I certainly will, Officer. Thank you.”
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
385 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
If you are in the mood to argue the case with the officer, then expect a ticket. Apologise and let him go and as advised keep it out of site, then you can mutter under your breath, Bud is cr4p anyway.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,194 Posts
I assume "Pale" means pale in colour; while "Light" means light on alcohol, i.e. lower alcohol content.... unless someone knows different
""Technically speaking, the only factor that makes something a light beer is that it’s low in calories (and as a result, usually lower in alcohol) ""
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,784 Posts
I wasn’t arguing my innocence. Just answering his questions.

As for the Buds:
A) I was 21
B) In the store I bought them from it was either Bud or Coors. I liked Coors even less.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,719 Posts
Useless fact #125.
When Skoda wasn't part of VAG they used to import Pilsner Urqell under a service part number! I'm not sure how legal it was, but their Regional Sales Managers always had an adequate supply. I was very lucky as a very close friend was the North West manager and always had a fridge full. I even came home from one Motor Show with a case full. And as for the amounts that were in the backs of the world teams rally service barges.............!!!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,719 Posts
Personally I like the light, IPA type beers, and especially the ones with the grapefruit hops. The best was the Waen Brewery's Pamplemouse but haven't seen that lately since the owner started only doing collaborations with other brewers.
Locally we get a lot of beers from Purple Moose in Porthmadog, and their Snowdonia is excellent, or beers from Wye Valley Brewery, of which I shall be imbibing this evening and during the match tomorrow afternoon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
385 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
British wine is rated as good as French now with some of the best coming from Cornwall and Kent. Witherspoon's are not ordering beer or wine from Europe now but I'm glad that Belgium beer is still there.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
4,436 Posts
British wine is rated as good as French now with some of the best coming from Cornwall and Kent. Witherspoon's are not ordering beer or wine from Europe now but I'm glad that Belgium beer is still there.
Did I miss something? Belgium is no longer in the EU or is it just very old beer that hasn't had to be ordered recently?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
There is a smallish brewery in Northern Ireland called Hillstown Brewery who do a wide range of beers. In my opinion these are well worth while exploring, perhaps with a little care as their Horny Bull Stout is 7%, although is very nice.

Another of their beers is Massey Red Ale with the outline of a Massey Ferguson tractor on the label. They have a cafe and shop on the premises and there is an old restored Massey sitting (inside) on top of the toilet area

Tesco in Northern Ireland stock some of their beers.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,418 Posts
Re duty, how much of a pack of cigarettes for £11-ish is tax?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,784 Posts
Did I miss something? Belgium is no longer in the EU or is it just very old beer that hasn't had to be ordered recently?
Naw! Just that Tim Whatshisname, boss of Wetherspoons, is something of a hypocrite when it comes to the EU. Says one thing, does the opposite.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,784 Posts
There is a smallish brewery in Northern Ireland called Hillstown Brewery who do a wide range of beers... ... Another of their beers is Massey Red Ale with the outline of a Massey Ferguson tractor on the label.
Tesco in Northern Ireland stock some of their beers.
That’s very appropriate, given that Harry Ferguson was of course from Ulster. Possibly even a Hillstown man?

Which also explains why all the original 1950’s Ferguson tractors were grey. Used the same paint colour as used on all the traditional Ulster steel-clad farm buildings. They only turned to red after the take-over by Canadian company Massey-Harris. To create Massey-Ferguson. Today, part of the worldwide Agco empire, along with Case, International, David Brown, Same, Tafe, and other brands of the tractor pioneers era.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
Personally I like the light, IPA type beers, and especially the ones with the grapefruit hops. The best was the Waen Brewery's Pamplemouse but haven't seen that lately since the owner started only doing collaborations with other brewers.
Locally we get a lot of beers from Purple Moose in Porthmadog, and their Snowdonia is excellent, or beers from Wye Valley Brewery, of which I shall be imbibing this evening and during the match tomorrow afternoon.
I've had a couple of Purple Moose beers as a friend lives and works on the railway up there.
I too prefer the lighter hoppy beers, but also enjoy the darker chewy ones in winter - tried McEwans Champion - 7.3%, 3 for a fiver in the Coop.
Wye Valley Butty Bach is consistently good, as is their HPA.
American Bud was a huge disappointment. Often called 'Making love in a punt' like some of the other American brews years ago. I gather micro-breweries have really taken off in the States, and the beers are more like British beers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
385 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Haven't seen Double Diamond for ages. It's still made because it's prince Philip's favourite beer.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top