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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 62 plate 2ltr 4x4, about a 2 month ago the light came on along with the engine warning light, diagnostic showed EHR (?) valve. On advice the warnings we're cleared and diesel cleaner used as changing the valve doesn't always resolve the problem.
No problems until yesterday when it came on and went into limp mode, this morning its driving fine, no lights.
Ii can't get a diagnostic until next week, is it OK to use diesel cleaner again until then or any ideas.
 

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I assume the diesel cleaner was put into the fuel tank? If it was has all the fuel been used?

If all the fuel has been used it is O.K. to put some more cleaner in, if it has not, it is not advisable to overdose as the fuel lubricates some items and an overdose of cleaner could reduce the amount of lubrication.

Not wishing to put a downer on things but if you mean the egr valve, putting a diesel cleaner into the fuel will have very little effect as the product is burnt before it gets to the egr and is of little benefit.

Here is a link to a good article on egr's
EGR Cleaning and EGR Cleaners | Oilem - Lifting the Lid on Fuel & Oil Additive Market
 

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Hi Treze,

Several very common issues are raised by your query. In addition the the very good summary posted by The Hood already in #2, here are a few of my own.

- It may be worthwhile reading up a little about the diesel exhaust emission control systems in general. Here is a "starter for 10" from the Yetipedia section of the technical forum in this very website...
DPF Information

- The Glow Plug warning light in the instruments cluster can be triggered by a huge number, possibly hundreds) of different fault codes. Relatively few of them directly to do with the glow pugs themselves. Inexplicably though, it is not uncommon for one or more problems in the exhaust emissions systems to light the GlowPlug indicator. Why those don't light the exhaust warning light - nobody really knows! You are already on the Right Way of Thinking though - in considering any warning light to actually mean - "Read fault codes from the On Board Diagnostics (OBD) port for more information!"

- How did you actually get the fault codes read the first time? Did you pay a dealer or other garage to plug in a computer to read them for you? If so it may be a worthwhile investment to buy a relatively cheap bluetooth plug-in reader such as "Carista" that several members use. Widely available through marketplaces like Ebay or Amazon. Or even the c.£10-20 readers that have their own display and plug directly into the car's OBD port. I use one myself that cost just £13 from Aldi. Those give just the code itself and ability to erase it. You can often Google the exact meaning of each code though.

- If the first time it was indeed the "Exhaust Gas Recirculation" (EGR) valve that was giving a fault signal, as The Hood suspected, then no surprise that using a fuel system cleaning agent would only give temporary respite. While some of those (such as Archoil D6400 Max) are formulated to pass some of the effectiveness through to reducing the rate of clogging of exhaust components (like EGR valve and DPF (Diesel Particle Filter), as The Hood said, by the time those have passed through the engine's combustion process, they can only have a limited effect downstream. Perhaps best to regard those fuel additives as limited long-term help toward prevention of problems, rather than a "cure" in themselves?

- If the EGR valve is indeed clogged with soot (which seems a good bet from what you described in #1) to the extent it cannot open and close fully - giving rise to a fault code. That in turns brings on the warning light and in more extreme cases causes the car to drop into "limp mode" to prevent permanent damage. Then it would likely be so full of soot, that only removal and a physical clean out would effect a more lasting solution.

- The EGR valve on the Yeti, is however rather difficult to reach. Buried down the back of the engine below the turbo. If using a professional garage to do the work, it often works out cheaper, and definitely preferred by the garage, to fit a brand new valve unit, rather than pay labour charges to spend hours cleaning the old, clogged valve. New valves don't come cheap though. But then neither do technicians who can remove and clean them. :-(

- If the EGR valve is sufficiently clogged with soot to be causing fault code(s) and limp mode running, then the next component or valve in the exhaust gas recirculation system will very likely also be heavily clogged and possibly the next in line to give a fault. That is the Throttle Body on the front of the engine, just below the inlet manifold. This is much more accessible than the EGR valve and cleaning it is a feasible DIY job for a reasonably competent amateur mechanic, or even garage. Several members have completed this themselves using the guide at item No. 60 in the Technical forum Yetipedia section, here:

- As both a long term and potential short term respite for clogged exhaust components, have you tried taking the car for an "Italian Tune Up" or reasonably long 20+ miles run along main roads or motorways at moderately constant speeds. Or "drive it like you stole it" in some parlances. If nothing else that can give the DPF chance to run its regeneration programme. Where it injects extra fuel into the exhaust to raise the gas temperature high enough to burn off particle/soot build up there (and to a lesser extent in the EGR valve). Although this would be INEFFICTIVE if the car was carrying any fault codes at the time. As those would prevent any regeneration attempt from being initiated.

- In terms of prevention rather than cure, what has your typical journey pattern been like for the last few months? Many cars have been doing only short journeys during lock down. Which is the ideal scenario for just this type of clogged exhaust components to build up. Fuel additives may help to reduce the rate that problems build. there is no substitute though for decently long journeys for a modern diesel.
 
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