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HI there.
Recently made redundant after 20 years of company car ownership so facing the novelty of buying my own car !
We’re about to take our first foray into the world of Yeti ownership and hoping for a bit of advice please as to which model to go for.
I have 4 or 5 cars at local dealers I’ll be looking at once lockdown ends, all diesels between 2010 -2013 and 85k to 110k on the clock.
Whilst we don’t have a caravan at the mo we are looking at getting one of the relatively lightweight Swift Basecamp so need a car with towing capability.

1. TDI 110bhp 2wd (one in SE trim and one Elegance)
2. TDI 140bhp 4x4 se (one in SE and one in Elegance)
3 TDI 103bhp Greenline (S spec)

Initial thoughts lean towards the first two but the higher Road tax bracket on the 4x4 makes me wonder if its necessary, likewise the £30 road tax on the greenline is tempting but the 1.6 engine will certainly need more coaxing I’d imagine, even on a sub 1000kg van. Does the 4x4 have any benefit over the 2wd for normal road driving or does the additional servicing on the Haldex unit outweigh the benefits ?

Lastly, does buying a car with a tow bar fitted suggest it’ll have more transmission wear than one without. Or am i best getting one that hasn’t towed (at this mileage and price point) and get a tow bar fitted myself ?

So, any thoughts and pearls of wisdom would be most gratefully accepted
thanks
Andy
 

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Hi Andy and welcome to this forum. I personally won't make comment on towing etc., but I do know, and many will back me up, that if you are not driving good distances daily, eg.70-100 miles, then petrol would be better than diesel. No dobt and expert will be along soon to explain.
 

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I suppose that 4x4 may come in handy if you envisage tugging a 'van off a muddy site, but there plenty of suggestions on here that choice of tyres can have a lot of influence.
Doing a low annual mileage in a diesel is less of a concern than how that mileage is achieved. An engine doing 100 miles a week doing 5x20-mile trips may eventually suffer DPF problems, while a similar engine doing 100 miles a week as 2x50-mile trips may be less prone.
Certainly chugging 4-5 miles a day won't be good for it, and while my daily commute was only 60 miles max round trip, since retirement it's much lower, especially since Covid19. My personal experience, and I emphasise it is purely personal experience, is that I've yet to experience any problems. My only concession in trying to circumvent possible problems is to give the car a fast run of 50+ miles once a month or so, or if I've been doing a lot of short hops.
The car forums are awash with discussions about the frequency of DPF regeneration. Some owners report them happening even on short city journeys, others say it needs a long run, a minimum rev limit, more than ¼ tank of fuel, or various other criteria.
* Edit *
My daughter runs a 1.2 petrol, and I like it a lot. It's very quiet and goes extremely well.
 

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Hi Andy, welcome to the forum

SE or Elegance....Try the seats in both as they differ between models. If both seats O.K. go for the Elegance.

2x4 or 4x4.....If you drive on normal roads, don't need to tow your caravan over muddy fields, or belong to a 4x4 Response group, get a 2x4 and fit winter tyres. A 2x4 on winter tyres is more capable than a 4x4 on summer tyres.

110.140 or Greenline, if you are going to tow a caravan 140, as it will cope even better with the extra weight, on hills, and damp ground. They will all cope but the 140 more than the others.
 

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Thanks all for the replies, you’ve pretty much confirmed my thoughts. The vehicle wouldn’t be used for repeated short commutes so happy a diesel would suffice although throwing a spanner in the works I found that there are some 1.4 petrols around I wasn’t originally aware of !
 

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Hi Lymeswold,

Good luck with your Yeti search. You won’t be disappointed with the car’s versatility, whichever model you opt for in the end.

Interesting choice of forum name. After the soft blue cheese variety invented at the famous Wensleydale Creamery during the early 1980s, but taken up and produced by Dairy Crest at Cannington, Somerset. Any particular reason for choosing that name?
 

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Ah,,, inherited years ago when I received some junk mail addressed to a Mr Lymeswold ! My surnames Elsegood so lord knows how they got that wrong. My lodger at the time started calling me that and the rest is history!!
 

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Didn't Lymeswold get taken off the market? Something to do with Listeria contamination IIRC. It doesn't seem to be available these days, which is a pity, as I quite liked it.
 
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I vaguelly recall an article regarding the 1.6tdi Greenline in a caravan magazine and towing a smaller caravan in a magazine and think it was their towcar of year?
Better to find a car with a towbar already fitted as very expensive to do properly. Make sure it has been correctly fitted and coded to the car so that it all functions correctly and the car knows when a trailer is attached so it can modify its systems.
 

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Interesting thoughts Ken thanks, any way do you know how I can check if the tow bar has been installed correctly?
 

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Didn't Lymeswold get taken off the market? Something to do with Listeria contamination IIRC. It doesn't seem to be available these days, which is a pity, as I quite liked it.
Yes, Lymeswold ceased production in 1992. Only 8 years after it launched. Nothing to with listeria at all though. Lymeswold was produced using pasteurised milk.

It was a victim of its own initial success. In the first two years after launch, demand was running some 10x greater than the ability to produce what was originally intended to be a rather “specialist” cheese at Cannington. The initial marketing was so successful that demand exceeded supply. Moreover, despite a snooty reception from some so-called food critics, it was VERY well-liked by the public and garnered an unprecedented amount of free publicity in editorials, even a government minister extolling its virtues on national TV.

As a live product with a very limited shelf life, but a maturation length that ran into weeks, production was carefully planned to meet the expected limited demand. This was a “blue” cheese after all, with Brie like qualities, that was not expected to generate such huge demand. Unlike say Stilton, it was a soft cheese with a limited shelf life, so could not be stocked up to meet peak demand in December in the same way that Stilton can. To keep, supplies on the shelves, production has to pretty much keep pace with demand. As a live product that can’t be switched on and off overnight in the same way that a car production line can. Instead Lymeswold was intended as a slow-burn, limited market, gourmet product, that could command a high unit price, for relatively low volume production.

The post-launch free publicity was so successful that Cannington, a relatively small plant with a highly skilled workforce, well accustomed to producing soft cheeses with their individual idiosyncrasies, simply did not have the capacity to keep up. One £2m follow up Advertising campaign was canned, as not needed. Much to the displeasure of the agency who had been contracted to run it. Who subsequently bad-mouthed the product with “influencers” (in the days before social media was available to do that). Which could have been where the untrue listeria rumours came from, come to think?

Within a few months, demand from the all powerful supermarkets reached such a crescendo, that the “suits” pressed for semi-matured stocks to be released early. Result was the quality compared to what was available at launch, was very poor. Moreover, very variable. To the extent that many second-wave consumers were put off.

In a further attempt to match supply to demand, production was expanded to some of the bigger plants, elsewhere in the Dairy Crest capacity. Plants more accustomed to producing commodity cheddar in 20kg rectangular blocks for industrial buyers (who need bulk cheese in industrial volumes for various processes, or for onward packing into smaller blocks for supermarket own-label sales). Those plants had neither the more specialised equipment, skills, nor patience to produce a niche cheese like Lymeswold AND keep the quality up to the initial standard produced by Cannington. The latter aspect pushed by marketing and supermarket accounts departments that simply wanted to get as much product as possible out on shelves as soon as possible, to tap into that pent-up demand.

Thus many more customers who loved the original product either could no longer find it on the shelves, or when they did, two years later, the product and quality was not the same as that they remembered. Quality was “patchy”. Those who bought packs that had been produced at Cannington were still pleased with it. Who told all their friends. When those friends went out to buy packs that been produced elsewhere, they wondered what all the fuss was about for such a bland product.

Eventually, demand fell away again. Supermarkets grew disillusioned with patchy supplies, (worst thing from a supermarket buyers point of view is a shelf slot with no product on it), so stopped listing it for purchase. Production at those other factories was ceased. Cannington soldiered on for a while, still producing excellent cheese, but the image was tarnished. So by 1992, that line was shut down too.

It is still used apparently as the classic case history in university marketing courses as what can go wrong when launching a new product. Or if you want to maintain a stable demand for a quality product, then keep it as a limited supply, quality product, and then charge more for it. An example of how not to try to extend a niche product to a national market. How to destroy an excellent product through bean-counter led marketing decisions.

I shared your liking for the original product. I was a member of some of the pre-launch taste panels who were given access to some of the earliest sample batches, to try out and report on. Before it even had a name.

The lesson has been learned though. A couple of years ago, a “farmhouse” cheesemaker from Cheshire started to produce a very similar, semi-soft, mild blue, crusted cheese (name now gone from memory). The producer herself was taking samples for tasting and to gauge demand, around selected supermarkets in the Booths chain. (Booths are Based in Preston and limited to NW England and a couple of North/West Yorkshire locations only).

That was remarkably similar to Lymeswold in all sorts of ways. Which was totally by accident, as when questioned, the young producer had not heard of Lymeswold until she started running the tasting visits, when other Booths customers had mentioned the similarity to her in-store. She listened carefully to the story. Last I heard her lovely cheese was only available via her nearest Booths store in Knutsford.
 

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Interesting thoughts Ken thanks, any way do you know how I can check if the tow bar has been installed correctly?
If you have a trailer board, when pluged in the reverse lights on the car should be disabled and as far as I know the rear fog as well, using the one on the trailer board instead. There should be no bulb failure or other warnings on the dash.
 

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Quick test for correct reprogramming, with engine running and trailer plugged in::
Select reverse and there should be a trailer diagram in the central dash display.
Rear fog light disabled.
Turn ignition off, lock car and unplug trailer, alarm should sound.

There are many other things to check but if those three work you should be OK.
 
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