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Discussion Starter #1
Hello !

After 11 years as my faithful trusty companion, my little 21 year old Nissan Micra has finally come to a point where it just can’t go on much longer. I will be very sad to see it go.

However, the hunting around for something new has introduced me to the Yeti - and I’m in love !

I wish I wish I wish I could buy a new one, but that’s not to be, so I’m looking at the next best thing - ŠKODA ‘new approved’.

I would love to hear from anyone who has experience with buying a Yeti this way. In particular, can I trust the ‘Multi point test’ that’s offered with it. Despite the ‘new approved’ being AA approved, it seems that ŠKODA actually do ithe multi point test themselves, not the AA. So do I need to get my own separate one done, of can I rely on it ?

Thank You !

Hoping to be a fully fledged ‘owner member’ soon,

Love Didne xxx
 

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Hi Didne, welcome to the forum. As an owner of a Nissan Prairie from new for twenty one years and 184000 carefree miles I can understand how you feel. For some reason the forum did not like your post and hid it, but hopefully all will be well from now on.
 

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Hello !

After 11 years as my faithful trusty companion, my little 21 year old Nissan Micra has finally come to a point where it just can’t go on much longer. I will be very sad to see it go.

However, the hunting around for something new has introduced me to the Yeti - and I’m in love !

I wish I wish I wish I could buy a new one, but that’s not to be, so I’m looking at the next best thing - ŠKODA ‘new approved’.

I would love to hear from anyone who has experience with buying a Yeti this way. In particular, can I trust the ‘Multi point test’ that’s offered with it. Despite the ‘new approved’ being AA approved, it seems that ŠKODA actually do ithe multi point test themselves, not the AA. So do I need to get my own separate one done, of can I rely on it ?

Thank You !

Hoping to be a fully fledged ‘owner member’ soon,

Love Didne xxx
It will depend a lot on the dealer you buy from. I would suggest avoiding Marshalls as I never got the multi point test from them, in fact I got sweet F A from them. Find a good small family owned/run dealer and visit them for a chat and see what they have to offer. Hope it all goes well for you.
 

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Welcome to the forum Didne. Unfortunately new Skoda Yetis are a thing of the past, much to the disappointment of many on this forum. Buying from a Skoda dealer should give you some warranty, just be careful to make sure you know what is covered and what isn't. You haven't said what sort of age of car you are looking to buy nor what sort of driving, annual mileage, etc that you expect to do. If you give us a few more details I am sure you'll find helpful advice.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Oh Brilliant, thanks good point

Thank you Ruari and SnowGood ?

And oops sorry I meant USED approved (are you able to change my heading to ‘Used’ ?)

I’d like new as possible and low mileage as possible. ’
SKODA Used Approved’ are oddly very similarly priced to Arthur Daley’s round here, so Used Approved it is.

I won’t be doing high mileage for the first 2 or 3 years, probably less than 3000 miles per year, fairly local, but Id eventually like to spend most of my time doing 3-6 month trips in her, car-camping, UK and France, maybe Spain, with seasonal work in between. Maybe further afield if Brexit allows ?. (Browsed some great ideas for setting it up as a camper ?). I’m not into tearing down motorways I prefer to saunter along country lanes (of course that might all change behind the wheel of a new car!).

Since they’re no longer available new, it seems to make sense to get as good a one as I can now while there are still some reasonably newish low mileage ones about. Im planning keeping it forever. Manual gears for sure (unless anyone can convince me otherwise ?). I was thinking a 1.2 petrol would probably be fine? That’s really for no better reason than its close to what I’m familiar with. My little old 1000cc Micra has been absolutely brill, despite joe publics derisory looks and comments (I don’t care - nobody wants to nick mine!) with plenty long trips (including motorways) until recently.

I don’t really know anything about deisel cars. Maybe diesel’d be better? Or a bigger engine, either diesel or petrol? I ran 1200cc petrol and 2000cc deisel by my insurance company (NFU National Farmers Union they are Brill-not online but well worth phoning them) and quotes came back almost identical...

Any pointers very welcome. Longevity and reliability are important to me. I don’t need to get there quickly. I’d rather enjoy the journey

Yeti seems to have a very loyal following, Got to be Good

Cheers

Didne xxx
 

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Tittle adjusted.

If you are anywhere near Mansfield Rainworth Skoda are brilliant, they supplied mine new (and several other members). They did what they promised when they promised to, and their price beat everyone else. Sounds like you need a 1.2 Petrol. With your mileage avoid diesel and also any Yeti with a sunroof as it will leak, if not now it will later on.

.
 

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Agree with The Hood petrol is what you should look for and the 1.2TSi will feel quite nippy compared to your Micra. Quite suitable for all the driving you mention you will be doing now and in the future. Production stopped in 2017 so that will be the "newest" year if you find one at an acceptable price. Avoid very early petrols 2010 and 2011.

The higher spec models SE and SE L come with more extras but ask your self if you need them before spending money. The L&K was the top of the range but came with a brown leather upholstery and sunroof ( which have a tendancy to cause problems meaning one member has renamed them as a LeaK). We have a store of brochures for each of the years of production which will help you understand what was standard on any particular model. Just look here: https://www.yetiownersclub.co.uk/forum/13-technical/5540-library.html

Low mileage, especially very low isn't necessarily a good thing despite what dealers tell and 10,000 to 12,000 a year IF the car has been properly looked after should be okay. Try and get details of service history and actually all work that has been done on the car
 

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Tittle needs adjustment!
 

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Details of the Approved Used Warranty here: https://az749841.vo.msecnd.net/sitesengb/alv1/f1b6bc56-e354-4f08-ac79-56879001efe6/32529_skoda_approved_used_warranty_doc_v3.72110e7831bce3d9427fded26bdd2652.pdf


There are extra benefits eg warranty for two years, if you buy the Yeti on finance, even if you don't actually need finance. You can withdraw from the finance within the 14 day period, pay it off, and you keep any of the inducements offered. :)
Details here: https://www.skoda.co.uk/used-cars/deals
 

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Hi Didne.

There’s another member who did a similar transition to yourself, not too long ago. Called “Micratoyeti” oddly enough. :smile:
Perhaps he’ll be popping in sometime? It might be good for you to compare notes? Reach out via a PM perhaps?

There were three petrol engines (at least). In 1.2 litre, 1.8 and towards the run out 1.4 capacities. The 1.8s had a reputation for being a tad thirsty and were very rare, even when new. So I doubt you’ll find many second hand. Even if they were suitable for your needs, which I also doubt, from what you say.

The Diesel engine variants came in 110 ps, 140, 170 power outputs to begin with. The 170 and 140 being replaced after the VW “dieselgate” fiasco with a 150 horse power version. All 2-litre capacity. Just different stages of tune and boost, etc. Something you may need to be aware of if you did choose to go that fuel source (which I wouldn’t recommend - more later). As is increasingly the case with modern engines, it’s not the cc you need to look at when considering adequacy for your needs, but the bhp.

From the annual mileage you indicate, I would NOT be recommending a diesel though. As others have mentioned. Diesel engines generally, especially turbocharged, thrive and do well on high mileages, provided adequately serviced. It’s low mileages and too many short trips that create “diesel h e l l” (can’t use that word in here or the censor changes it to ****). If not intending to use for towing then a petrol would seem by far the best route. The 1.2 engines though came in three different evolutions. The earliest had chain driven camshafts that were prone to premature failure. Mid-production version’s had more robust chain specification. Later models used a belt driven cam and are generally considered the best bet. Depends on your budget which era to go for.
There are several threads that go into more detail about when the transitions from one to the other took place. One of those featuring as a discussion just last week. Might be worth looking some of those up for some background reading?

Like Snowgood said. Don’t be put off by moderately high mileages. Modern cars are much more durable than of old, IF looked after. It’s neglect and too many short trips that kills them. And by “neglect” I mean so called “recommended” service intervals that are too long and designed only to reduce costs over the first three years of fleet ownership. Not to prolong the life of the car. Pay more attention to service history, invoices for work done, and evidence of a careful, thoughtful owner, than mileage. Mileage is only a negative if too low. (Witness the figures in my signature line). Too may used car dealers still advertise “low mileage” though, as if it was some kind of desirable attribute.

Ref the insurance quote. The 1.2 TSi petrol and the 110 CR (common rail) diesel have near identical power outputs around or just under the 110 horses mark. Consequently very similar levels of performance when lightly laden. The diesel scores if running heavy or towing due to better torque. Hence though, if the NFU Mutual were quoting 1.2 110 ps petrol against 2-litre 110 ps diesel, I’m not surprised the quotes were very similar. As mentioned earlier, check the power output rather than capacity when looking for like for like quotes.

I’ll leave others to cover more angles. Those above should be a starter though? There is however in the Wikipedia section an article called “Older Yetis - what to expect” written by some idiot calling himself “Flintstone”. Very much in need of a major update now. To include things like sunroofs - avoid like coronavirus, the 1.2 cam chain issues, etc. But may be worth a read still?
 

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Having mentioned the 1.2 TSi cam chain thing. I should also point out that a number of early engines that were subject to the stretch and chain rattle issues, culminating in failure if not attended to, could easily have been upgraded to the later, more robust chain. By a previous owner. So not a total “don’t touch”. But perhaps only if you can establish if the replacement had been done? The later chains were better by all accounts. But not totally immune. Perhaps a cost to budget for if not already been replaced? Or better still, haggle to get included by the seller? If that’s a dealer, they’ll be more amenable to that, than dropping the price.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
You guys are absolutely amazing

In November, when my lovely mechanic Keith (Highly recommended KG Autos Dover Road, Burton on Trent if you interested-proper old school honesty he has a great reputation round here) announced that it really was time to start looking for a new car I was absolutely daunted, terrified, by the prospect. Finally finding a car that I really like, and omg it actually has really good reviews left right and center finally started to feel hopeful. But you guys are the cream! Thank you! My head is swimming with transmission systems and deisel pollution regulations and catalytic converters and I haven’t watched tv in weeks! Trying to sort out which model to go for was my next major topic and there it is all sorted out in one fell swoop a 2017 1.2 Petrol! Thankyou all !
 

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Discussion Starter #14
So Bryetian, very interesting about the finance deal then withdrawing within 14 days but keep the benefits. Yum! Have been studying the links you posted (thanks!) trying to find that detailed in their small print but so far no success. Will see if I can get the paperwork from my local SKODA dealer, but also if you are able to point me in the direction of the small print if it’s online would be most interested- Thanks!

Flintstone and SnowGood - am I reading this right are you recommending that I actually AVOID very low mileage cars? I thought they would be better. What is the reasoning behind that, and how many miles are too low? There are a few 2016 2017 models at 12000-14000 miles on Skoda approved list at mo that I was interested in. I’m pretty sure I saw a couple under 5000 miles recently too, though I think they may have been automatics. I get it about service history, makes sense, but is low miles A Bad Thing?

Micratoyeti brill name! I’ve not Really found my way round forum yet nor figured out how to pm (brain is turning to mashed potatoes with all this overload of car mechanics) but found his ( her? ) threads and working through them. it reads like it was written by me!

Thanks for link to brochures too, SnowGood. will get them, was disappointed that the Skoda site only held brochures for current cars. Bit daft since they’re still selling used ones too

The Hood, thank you v much for the recommendation for Rainworth Mansfield - it’s only about 30 miles from me so definitely a contender. Other branches within about 30 miles are Bristol Street Derby, Autosales Cannock, Listers Coventry, Johnson’s Skoda Birmingham, and Trust Skoda Wolverhampton (which I found a glowing but old (2015) report on from Choki in this forum). If anyone’s got any particularly positive, or negative, experiences to share regarding any of those dealers Id love to hear! Would go maybe another 30 miles further for the right car but don’t want to be ridiculously far away when servicing/MOT time comes.

Well I think it’s bed time now.
I feel like you have taken me under your (collective) wing
I think I will sleep better for it
Thankyou xxx
 

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Some main dealers are not to be trusted as after all they are in business to sell cars and not be honest! I would avoid Rainworths of Mansfield as they told my brother that a start up rattle on his 1.2 tsi was a characteristic,the engine timing chain stretched to its limit some time later with great cost.
 

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From your list Listers, Trust, and Rainworth have all previously had positive recommendations from members, though staff change so not necessarily a guarantee.
 

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Didne
With a 2017 1.2 TSi you should be getting an engine with the belt driven cam. Check the car being sold. Those are scheduled for change every 5 years. Budget for that in servicing costs. Not massively expensive at the many independents who have experience. (Sounds like you have a good one lined up already)

“Is low mileage a Bad Thing?”
  • Not in every case IF the car has been properly looked after. (E.G. oil changes at maximum 12-month intervals rather than the “recommended” mileage interval. Those recommendations are intended for cars that spend their life doing easy miles on motorways and typically get 30-40,000 year.)
  • Too often though Low Miles is associated with neglect. A car that has done nothing but short urban trips. And or spent months on end stationary without turning a wheel. In that scenario you’ll get:
  • Build up of combustion contaminants in the oil. Never gets hot enough to evaporate those from the oil to be re-burned in the cylinders.
  • Excessive wear and tear compared to the mileage in components in the transmission that has been used constantly. Compared to a “high mileage” car that has spent 90% of those miles at constant speed and gear on motorways.
  • Higher wear and tear of suspension components that have been abused over numerous speed bumps, constantly on every one of its few journeys. Compared to that high mileage car that has lived on billiard table smooth motorways.
  • Long periods parked up immobile leads to suspension bushes becoming “set” in one position. Eventually that leads to premature failure. Rubber bushes last much longer when they have regular “exercise”. Also brakes will be subject to more rapid corrosion when not used. Pistons and pads risk becoming seized, etc.
  • The interior however is likely to be mint. Whereas the high miler will show signs of lots of use.
“How many miles are too few?”
  • Impossible to say really, as so much depends on how the car has been used and cared for, or not.
  • I’m probably an exception in that I tend to walk away from anything with less than 7-8000 per year as too risky. I go looking for a higher miler, perhaps 15,000 plus per year on a diesel. Less for a petrol engine. Vastly more important though is frequent servicing and a record of adequate maintenance.
  • But I’m looking at cars older than the two years you mentioned.
  • Witness we bought our current Yeti at 3-years old with 78,000 miles. It’s now just under 220,000 miles and running like a train. Needed a new EGR valve and turbo at 140,000 due to soot clogging. Before I had discovered fuel additives. Its first unexpected fail was an ECU fault last year, that cost £370 to repair at an independent auto electrical specialist. I just fitted its third (lifetime counting new) set of brake discs and pads last weekend. It had new struts as expected a couple of years ago. But at a comparable cost to a pair of new tyres, that’s not a big deal.
  • Compared to the current BMW in my “fleet” (see my full signature below). I failed to follow my own advice when I bought that as I fell in love with its spec and interior condition. Having run two similar models previously over 12 years. It had well under 10,000 per year, but had spent the previous two years doing little more than the mileage to the MOT centre and back. Everything worked on its test drive. But I then had to spend the next two years replacing many of the components mentioned above as vulnerable to low miles. I’ve now had it 5 years and it is finally up to the condition to see it through a few more. But compared to its immediate predecessor I had for a similar time and mileage, it has cost me 50% more to maintain. I bought its predecessor at 140,000 miles and 7 years old. That cost me a lot less to get to over 200,000.
Your money, your choice. But that’s my experience over 50 years of motoring. Not just derived from the most recent examples quoted.
 

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Details on withdrawing from the finance are hard to find. Neither dealer nor VW Finance want you to do that.

There is also a lot of confusing and inaccurate anecdotal information on the interweb. Many people misunderstand withdrawal so be careful.

I've found searching for VW Finance right of withdrawal give some useful results.

The details will be in the small print of the written agreement that you sign. Read it carefully and make the sales person wait while you do so.

This is not cancellation or early/voluntary termination of the finance. Withdrawal is the important word.

Within the 14 day cooling off period you contact VW Finance (not the dealer) and tell them you wish to withdraw from the agreement. They will then tell you the amount you need to send them which will include a daily interest amount for each day of the cooling off period you have used up: I think mine was £7 per day.

You then have 30 days to pay them by cheque, debit card over the phone or bank transfer and they send you a letter confirming that they have no interest in the vehicle.

You keep the 'extras' which were offered to induce you to take the finance.
As a bonus, this doesn't affect your credit rating as it's as if the finance agreement never existed.

I did it when I bought the TTRS and the Yeti.

This is a copy of the relevant clause from my finance deal for the Yeti. I think the interest figure may be wrong.

3229
 

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Hello Didne,
I have tried 3 times today to write this......Now I see why!
Try Mitchells of Chester if they are close enough to you.
I tried to put the URL here but it barred it as suspected spam.
I bought my last Yeti from them unseen and they delivered it to Poole.
Their service was excellent, I cannot praise them more highly.
They have 8 Yetis 7 Outdoor and 1 Monte Carlo. plenty of 1.2 DSGs
Low mileage cars often suffer premature wear due to not always getting up to full operating temperature.
Good luck.
Colin.
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Hello All I’m Back!

Hope you all okay.

Had intended to test drive a Yeti today, primarily to see if one will fit in the garage, and more to the point whether (unlike my sister in her shiny new Honda jazz) I can actually get out of the car while it’s still in the garage !
Anyway, something came up and I couldn’t go so fingers crossed for tomorrow.

Flintstone, thankyou so much for explaining about the low mileage issue. That all makes sense now, and I will follow your advice.
Also what you said about a car ‘sitting stationary’ rings true of what happened to my Micra when I went off travelling for a year and left it in the garage (hot tip from NFU for anyone else planning something similar don’t cancel your insurance just drop it to the minimum level of ’Theft’ and keep building your no claims discount). When I came back, it failed its MOT due to a suspension issue. Keith my mechanic said it was due to being left stationary so long. He wasn’t exactly sure where the problem lay and that he wouldn’t know for certain until he started stripping it down, but warned me I might be looking at £500 bill to sort it. After the initial shock I decided to give him the go-ahead, on the basis I knew I couldn’t replace my car for £500. All ended well, it wasn’t as bad as he feared and he phoned a few hours later with a cheery ‘All done, forty quid’ . I love him. But it all tallies up.
You make me realise I’ve been neglecting my car. I’m sorry. I didn’t mean to. I didn’t understand.

Bryetian, i chased up about the finance details today. My goodness, they hold their cards close to their chest, don’t they? Skoda online chat and Skoda main finance department, would NOT email or snail mail me the terms and conditions so that I could ‘study them so I can fully understand what I am getting into before I commit’. Said I might get them from my local dealer, but I don’t want them getting too excited about me yet. As it turns out, I can’t go down that route anyway as it’s my lovely mum who is financing the car. She’s partially sighted and can’t drive anymore so I do all her driving for her, but i can’t afford a new car. Anyway, what I did learn from Skoda Finance Department is that the ’Finance Agreement Holders Name and No Other must be on the logbook’. NFU Insurance (who I want to stay with cos they’re great) require the Driver to be the Owner and Keeper, so that’s that. Shame, as after your tip off I found reports from lots of people who did what you did, tho not very recently.
I expect we’ll be going down the credit card route instead. I rang Nationwide today about it and they reminded me that sector 75 protection is not just if the supplier goes bust but also ’if goods or services are defective or not as described‘ and he added, unprompted, if car keeps breaking down and dealer won’t deal with it, or fails to do or to supply what he promised’ then sector 75 would step in. He added that there was not a time constraint on this, and that the used approved warranty is part of what you’ve bought. Well that’s good to know. Not quite the extra 12 months warranty and breakdown service but still well worth having.

I’ve been reading with horror Micratoyeti‘s ongoing nightmare with the cowboys who supplied his car and hope I don’t end up in that scenario. I had naivety assumed that buying an approved used car took all the gambling out of buying a used car. Clearly it doesn’t. I’m glad I came across this forum as soon as I did.

Colin (are you the only person with a real name on here?) Thank you for your tip on Mitchell’s I will take a look. Also for your input about high mileage cars.

Does anyone have any thoughts on 4x4 yetis ? Would it be worthwhile for future planned camping trips ? I’m not anticipating any serious off-roading but I expect there‘ll be some fields involved. Also I‘m seriously addicted to car boot sales - every sunny saturday & sunday from Easter til October (buying stuff-tho mIght sell 1x or 2x a year) and theyre always in bumpy fields. The Micra‘s coped-I’ve been gentle and haven’t got stuck yet-but 4 wheel drive wasn’t an option

Thank you all so much for all for insights and for taking the time and effort for a newbie like me. It’s very much appreciated

lots a luv

Didne xxx
 
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