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My old Fabia seemed to love the higher Octane rated dervs like Shell Nitro. I filled up my snow monster tonight with said rocket fuel and she was growling hold me back all the way down the M5 from Bristol to Burnham on Sea.

In addition, and no I hadnt been drinking, the range went up between fill up and home by 20 miles (This when I had travelled over twenty miles) and the actual MPG when cruise was set at a fraction under 80 (sorry officer) was constantly 43 to 45 mpg.

Do Snow Monsters love the higher proofs - LOL?
 

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The original range would have been set according to previous average mpg, so if your return was a more economical journey than the last one the range would go up. I've tried the higher cetane fuels in mine and there was no noticeable difference, if anything I get the best return on good old Tesco. I also tried some Millers additive a while ago and did not notice any change with that either, mine does not seem to go for Cordon Bleu fuel.
 

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As far as petrol fuels are concerned I have always found that the higher octane fuels have given me smoother performance with a small increase in power and economy. The big proviso is that economy can only be gained if I don't use the extra power
. I haven't tried the up spec diesel fuels.
While it would take a few fills before you were confident there are long term benefits, if it turns out you are getting better mileage in your Yeti with a higher specification fuel then go for it and enjoy the benefits!
I use an upper cylinder lubricant in my vehicles and that helps all the time, no matter what type or grade of fuel I use.
 

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One fill proves nothing!
Do a thousand miles on each fuel and then compare the difference.
Oh, and diesel doesn't use octanes, but cetanes! Totally different.
 

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I was talking a few weeks ago with a guy who works for one of the largest fuel additive companies and he was telling me that in virtually every test they do then Shell comes out with the cleanest fuels, mainly petrol but also in most cases with diesel.
 

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Interesting. All our petrol and diesel vehicles have usually shown a preference for BP fuels, but times are a changing.

Your UK Shell Nitro Diesel seems to just have some extra "cleaning" additives. I couldn't find anything on the website about Nitro diesel having an increase in its cetane number over normal levels, so its probably just a bit more cleaner burning. The Shell site talks about a nitrogen additive so I'd guess it's probably a urea solution like a BlueTec system uses, so as to please the Euro VI advocates.

Edited by: plbxr
 

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Caltex Premium diesel is the duck's guts for our Yeti.
Rob.Edited by: hazmat5765
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I am no techie - Llanigraham - but as sure as eggs are eggs the car FEELS more responsive and eager and definately smoother.
 

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plbxr said:
Interesting. All our petrol and diesel vehicles have usually shown a preference for BP fuels, but times are a changing.

Your UK Shell Nitro Diesel seems to just have some extra "cleaning" additives. I couldn't find anything on the website about Nitro diesel having an increase in its cetane number over normal levels, so its probably just a bit more cleaner burning. The Shell site talks about a nitrogen additive so I'd guess it's probably a urea solution like a BlueTec system uses, so as to please the Euro VI advocates.

It is definitely not a urea solution (called AdBlue in the trade). I know, as I was Biz Manager for an AdBlue manufacturer. Never, ever put AdBlue (urea solution) into a fuel tank, it contains 67% water and will bu**er up your engine as the solution is corrosive to iron and several other metals. For cars and trucks that need urea solution they have a separate tank.
 

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Thanks, I didn't realise they were water based. Water and diesels certainly don't mix, as my brother found out one day after he hydrauliced his Land Cruiser and put a hole through the top of a couple of pistons.
 

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Well i just gotta stick my five eggs worth in here if that's ok.I use,and have done for ten months now,Cepsa premium diesel in my yeti.I have absolutely no doubt's that he runs smoother,quieter and more economically on it.I have chipped him up a tad which also helps but the benefits were being felt prior to that.It is a bit dearer but feel that's offset by the slight improvement in economy and cleaner burning, but,how it work's out like that is as clear to me as mud.During a recent trip through France we had to make do with some normal grade and even the wife (bless her) commented on the different feeling it gave to the overall ride.Is it in my head,dunno,but it works for me/us and Yodo.
 

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Its been said before, but here it is again.

The Octane rating is used to (more or less) grade how ignitable the fuel is,therefore the lower the octane the more ignitable the fuel is. any other reference to octane is slick advertising. high octane fuel is more difficult to ignite therefore more desirable in a higher compression engine(less ping or pre-ignition) what may keep a motor cleaner when using high octane might be some extra detergents added to the fuel or you lack of ability to drive the aforementioned vehicle due to the prohibitive cost of filling the tank. you can decide that one.

So if you software modify your turbo engine some may recommend higher octane so that when you WOT it will not retard timing on ignition and turn down power output. But it will only slightly help during hot summer because intake air is 25-30+ celcius and your factory intercooler will not cool down air enough so "hotter air+fuel" will have a higher temp and pre-ignite if your octane is low. But what would do more difference is changing spark plugs to colder ones.

Use 95 octane and save money it will not make any difference in these cars if they have not been modified.
 

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A lot of technology on view here!Personally, I tend to buy the cheapest fuel available locally, but do not do a long trip to fill up simply to save a few pence per litre.
Last night, I filled up in Bristol at an Esso station, 134.9/litre. (This is 3p/litre cheaper than my local Esso station, only a mile from home.) This is the second time I have used this station, and I was going past on my way home. Previously, I have used Shell with a Waitrose 5p/litre discount voucher, and have used Sainsbury's, Asda's and Morrisons' diesel when passing and needing to fill up. I have not noticed any significant improvement in fuel consumption with any of these fuels, although motoring press comments suggest that branded fuels aught to be better than supermarket fuels.
Ultimately, driving style plays the biggest part in determining fuel economy. The Yeti, as has already been stated, is as aerodynamic as a brick, but can still be driven in a lively manner, when wishing to make progress, which gives rise ultimately to enjoyment. I, personally, have never bought any of my vehicles - cars or bikes- purely on the grounds of economic motoring. If I am to enjoy my driving, I use the performance when appropriate, and accept the consequent effect on fuel consumption.
 

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Should have mentioned in a much earlier post on fuel usage and forgot, so I will do it now:Several years ago, I signed up to a website which provided weekly emails which updated local fuel prices. I now receive notification for three postcodes covering the areas I am normally in during my driving. I cover home, BS48, Bristol, BS1, and Weston super Mare, BS23. The site provides a search area of 5,10 or 15 miles around the postcode, which from my point of view covers all my local supermarkets with filling stations, and the local Shell, Esso and BP outlets. Needless to say, the fuel at Gordano Services on the M5 is the most expensive in my area, by at least 5p/litre.The site is www.petrolprices.com.
It's also useful on holiday, as it can also pinpoint local 'cheap' fuel, in areas one is less familiar with.
 

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+1 with that website, I have been getting updates twice a week for several years, a word of caution though, their prices tend tobeslightly "adrift" by a couple of coppers per litre.
 

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Totally agree with the 2nd paragraph. Cost of fuel is important but, if I want to move quick it's right foot down and watch the speed limit.Different point, I remember buying my first gallon of petrol for 1 shilling & 9 pence. B***** **** I'm old.
 

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Tick Tock said:
Totally agree with the 2nd paragraph. Cost of fuel is important but, if I want to move quick it's right foot down and watch the speed limit.Different point, I remember buying my first gallon of petrol for 1 shilling & 9 pence. B***** **** I'm old.

Nah, just maturing into it.....

 
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