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Škoda Yeti 1.6 Greenline 2012.
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello people. I drive a Yeti 1.6 Greenline 2012, on 205/55/16 tyres. It clear that Yeti was never manufactured to be an "off-road" vehicle, but I am a muschroom enthusiast so I drive a fair bit of time in the rough roads, woods an so on. Because my ground clerance isn`t that big (15,5 cm), I am looking for a way to increase it. I would be much more relaxed if my ride height would be at least 3 cm bigger.
Do you have any sugesstions?
Thanx in advance!
 

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You could fit 215x60 tyres which would raise it a bit and I suppose you could probably fit the springs from a standard yeti.
 

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Škoda Yeti 1.6 Greenline 2012.
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanx. How about 215/65?
And if I change the springs, sholud I change the shock absorbers also?
 

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Hi Nenad, 215/65 is not type approved for any Yeti variant which could give you insurance problems. Allowed sizes here -

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FItting 215/60/16 tyres will give approximately 15mm increase in ground clearance. It will also reduce the indicated speed on the speedometer by about 5%, although you may be able to compensate for this via an option on the MFD.

215/65/16 is not a standard Yeti size, and not approved by Skoda in this application. This may give problems with insurance or at MoT time (I don't know the regulations in your location), and will probably make your speedo under-read.

Changing the springs as well will put your car at a standard (non-Greenline) ride height.
If I were doing this, I would change the shock absorbers (dampers) at the same time.
I don't know how many miles your car has done, and how worn out your original dampers are, but in removing the front springs you will have done 90% of the work to change the dampers anyway. Rear dampers are easy to change at any time.

I doubt the difference in spring height will push your current dampers out of their operating range, but it would be preferable to have dampers that were designed to work at the standard height.

Also, regarding dampers, check the diameter of the shiny metal rod that forms the top half of the damper's length. I believe there are two diameters available.
If the diameter changes, you will probably need to replace the strut top mounts at the same time.

Also, if your car has xenon headlamps, changing the spring length will likely alter the headlamp alignment. This may need some modification or programming to overcome.

It clear that Yeti was never manufactured to be an "off-road" vehicle
I disagree. The Yeti was designed to have a certain amount of off-road capability. It's just that you have chosen the model that is most biased towards on-road efficiency.
 

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According to Skoda specs,the Greenline is 155mm ground clearance,25mm less than other models,but still not a lot compared to proper off road designs.Putting 215-60 tyres on would give an extra 16mm,215-65 (like the Dacia Duster has) extra 27mm but maybe an insurance company could be awkward about it if a claim arose,this goes for any other changes like springs.Also the Speedo and mileage readings will be reading under by up to 8.6% from normal.As a standard speedo is set to read over anyway this would bring it nearer true speed!
 

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Perhaps you should have considered this before you bought the car.
And I can assure you that a standard Yeti is very capable off road. Ask Flintstone!
 

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+1 to Graham, mine has been on Salisbury plain and Slindon Safari driving course. Salisbury was about six years ago and members of our 4x4 Response group still sometimes mention seeing a Yeti keeping up with their vehicles on Salisbury, I just smile, been there done that.
 

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Hello people. I drive a Yeti 1.6 Greenline 2012, on 205/55/16 tyres. It clear that Yeti was never manufactured to be an "off-road" vehicle, but I am a muschroom enthusiast so I drive a fair bit of time in the rough roads, woods an so on. Because my ground clerance isn`t that big (15,5 cm), I am looking for a way to increase it. I would be much more relaxed if my ride height would be at least 3 cm bigger.
Do you have any sugesstions?
Thanx in advance!
Rubber 'doughnuts' under the springs used to be the way to go. Gave 20mm IIRC.
 

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Yeti S+ 2010 2.0TDi CFHA 110 2WD Manual
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Perhaps you should have considered this (that the Greenline version has lowered suspension) before you bought the car.
And I can assure you that a standard Yeti is very capable off road. Ask Flintstone!
I can indeed confirm that I have witnessed LlaniGraham's Yetis in some extreme off-road locations, many miles from the nearest surfaced road in fact.

Here are a few recent shots of my own (2WD) Yeti in its natural habitat. (Dalby Forest, North Yorkshire, 24th Sept 2021.)
1) Lurking behind a tree, ready to pounce.....
Tire Wheel Car Plant Land vehicle

In the dark a couple of hours later, there were enough competitors overshooting the junction, that I needed to rebuild the tape, blocking off that road directly ahead, no less than five times! Rally drivers eh? Or was it "late call" from the co-drivers, after the preceding small crest?

2) Not actually too far from a road as such, on this occasion. Hiding in the long grass. Not visible in this shot, but the gravel track you see at left of shot, did have some serious ruts, a mile or so back from this spot, where the route passed through a disused quarry. The Yeti's ground clearance however, was more than adequate to cope.
:)
Plant Car Sky Tire Cloud

As you can also see in this shot, the straight track leading to this corner was such, that the approach speeds of competing rally cars through that dip in the road, was well over 100mph. Three of the pre-requisites of a rally competition car are:
a) Good tyres, brakes and particularly dampers, that can reduce that speed by 2/3 in the space of 40-50 yards. On gravel.
b) A co-driver calm enough to call "Crest 40 Square Right" from the bottom of that dip you see in the middle distance. (y):D
c) A driver who is listening! :rolleyes:

3) Graham will appreciate the need for a nose cover! This close to a 90° junction. The green tarp was adjusted to protect the whole windscreen, shortly after this shot was taken.
Car Plant Tire Land vehicle Vehicle
 

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Kia Niro HEV2 and MG Midget
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Used a tarp like that several times, but I have to be able to see out so can't cover the windscreen, as I need to record the numbers as they pass.
This was "the office" on the recent Woodpecker in Radnor.
Automotive parking light Automotive tail & brake light Vehicle Car Automotive lighting


Car Vehicle Motor vehicle Speedometer Automotive design


Solved the problem of having no actual 12v battery in the Niro by buying a portable battery starter pack, that lasted all day.
 
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