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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
After much research into most of the PHEV's on sale and a test drive in the Peugeot 3008 and the Citroen C5 Aircross, we chose to buy a Skoda Octavia iV Estate. So far, we are delighted. It looks fabulous with the new design including splendid wheels, an overhang over the rear window and a low front roofline, so that (for a short person) visibility is good whilst not needing the sun visor. Despite the tyres being fairly low profile (225/45 R18) Skoda has matched the suspension to them and the ride is limousine-like on N Yorkshire's bumpy roads and much better than either the Yeti or the Karoq. The transition between e-power and engine is unnoteiceable and the 6-speed auto (hopefully the robust wet-clutch version) is also smoth.There are a large number of menu options, with switches for key functions and I've found my way around the many options, which didn’t take long. Before starting, I select the most useful display (currently power flow). The digital instruments are very clear. There are display options, but I have the speedo on the right and the e-power, engine boost and regen level on the left. The speedometer is very clear: as the virtual needle sweeps clockwise tiny lit dots appear as well as the numeric speed in 20mph intervals plus a numeric digital display in the bottom of the display. Voice control is very simple, accepting plain speech commands, so it will plan a journey using town, street, number as well as adjusting the aircon on either side and many other choices too. The regenerative braking is excellent: it has two levels of regeneration plus automatic but I have maximum regen, so that going downhill I hardly need to use the footbrake and light touches on the accelerator keep speeds within the appropriate limits in town. At junctions the brakes are hardly needed. The lane control works well - as a test I moved over the central white line, the steering vibrated and gently put me back in the centre of my lane. The smart cruise control is effective, although probably more useful on dual carriageways or motorways. I’ve done a couple of trips using battery only: the latest one was 16 miles on battery alone with an average of 21mph at a cost of £1.30. The display also claimed 300mpg, but this may just be the highest figure it can calculate as we used no fuel. On a longer journey using hybrid power, we covered 76 miles at an average of 26mph and 91mpg, with 2% of battery charge left, whilst on the day I collected it I drove 29 miles on hybrid at an average of 104mpg. It is possible to set a minimum charge level, eg 40%, so that the car can be driven emissions-free in town. I had difficulty in getting the MySkoda app to work after the sales manager's failed attempt on the day of collection, so I uninstalled & reinstalled the app and then it worked. It connects the Android ‘phone via Bluetooth as the car has a built-in Sim card It's useful in that I can monitor the car from the house and switch on the aircon manually or automatically, check the petrol and electrical consumption, set the charging times plus a few more eg to check the outside temperature. It's much more useful than Skoda Connect in the Karoq, which I used once. I’ll be able to use off-peak electricity for charging at 5p per kWhr, which would would give around 30 miles of motoring for 65p. The boot is bigger than previous cars and Rosie is able to get in and out easily, with lots of room to get comfy. There are two large storage spaces on either side of the boot, as well as space behind the rear seats and the rear of the boot protector. I’m going to run-in the car for the first 1000 miles, but with a combined horsepower of 202 the acceleration is awesome and even in e-mode, with the torque available from an electric motor, from zero mph upwards it rockets away, ideal around town. My only slight concern is that the car has complex menus and sub-menus to navigate through, so older less techy folk (like me) might have difficulty getting to know the options immediately after a quick run-through at the dealers. Skoda should also make the installation of MySkoda more intuitive. It is very easy to find the basics and drive the car away but it does need time to get the maximum benefits from all the built-in features. One final thing: the car is a foot longer than the Karoq, so to get it clear of the garage door I have put an old duvet in a bin bag on the wall to act as a buffer, with one of Rosie's squeaky toys on front. When I hear the first squeak, I open my door to chech the clearance on my side, then on the second squeak it's in place.

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Looking good! Super write-up.
Might I ask how you bought it....HP, PCP, PCH or a large sack of Yorkshire brass?
 

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Yeti S+ 2010 2.0TDi CFHA 110 2WD Manual
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Hi Jimmy,

Nice motor! Shame about the colour? :ROFLMAO:(y)

I'm waiting to read what The Hood thinks about those wheels? Certainly distinctive!

What is it like climbing in and out, with the lower height compared to Yeti or Karoq?

Nothing against your car in particular, but re: "The lane control works well - as a test I moved over the central white line, the steering vibrated and gently put me back in the centre of my lane."
I have a strong conviction that the increased fitment of "lane keeping" controls to wide range of cars, is in no small part responsible for the increasing occurrence of "middle lane hogging" on motorways, especially those of the four-lane variety. OK if you're in North America, where the done thing is to stay in lane and it's OK to overtake on left or right. On European autobahns and autoroutes though, not to mention UK motorways, I have a feeling they are at least part responsible for degradation of driving standards?
 

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I'm waiting to read what The Hood thinks about those wheels? Certainly distinctive!
Oh, dear am I that predictable? I was scrolling the post thinking that does not look too bad by today's standards and then the wheels came into view. Whenever car adverts come on the TV (or what is meant to be a car advert) I wonder if there is a nomination for the most hideous wheels. It would look so much better with some "normal" wheels. The edges look quite sharp I hope the lacquer holds up. Other than the wheels not a bad looking car and it even has a shelf to put your tea on whilst checking the tyre pressures.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
The wheels are much easier to clean and apparently they are designed to improve airflow. In order to get our anniversary present on the day this was available. We always used to have white cars and they are easy to keep clean. Access in the front is fine, which was our only concern before buying it, but delighted to remain Skoda owners. The bonnet has gas stays and two hold-down points. The orange cables are high-voltage and look rather pretty!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Quote Flintstone 'What is it like climbing in and out, with the lower height compared to Yeti or Karoq?'
Access was the second criterion after Rosie's ability to get in and out of the boot. The roofline and seats are lower than the K's and the procedure is to imagine you are wearing a mini skirt and endeavouring to avoid showing your underpinnings, so it's left leg under the steering wheel whilst simultaneously sliding the left cheek over the seat side support, duck the head slightly, then let everything else follow whilst smiling at the world outside. Getting out is even easier. I don't understand how lane keeping control contributes to lane hogging as the driver is always in charge and in fact it may prevent that dangerous moment when cars suddenly start to change lane, usually when the driver is on the 'phone. Shopping today: six miles, 69% power remaining even with aircon on and zero emissions. I was pleased that when I drovw to the front door to pick up Rosie with Mrs J. she said she could clearly hear the warning 'squeak'.
 

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Yeti S+ 2010 2.0TDi CFHA 110 2WD Manual
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I don't understand how lane keeping control contributes to lane hogging as the driver is always in charge and in fact it may prevent that dangerous moment when cars suddenly start to change lane, usually when the driver is on the 'phone.
Because that proportion of drivers who don't understand UK and European lane discipline principles, think the car is telling them to stay in lane, and so come to believe that is the "right thing to do" in all circumstances. Other than entering and leaving the motorway. I've known a number of such drivers who told me their philosophy for motorway driving is "to get into the middle lane as soon as possible, then stay there." Including one who said as much during a Q&A session on a Speed Awareness course in 2019, albeit in not quite those words. Many of them drivers who passed their tests in the days before a theory test existed, and when there was no motorway experience included in the practical test. Therefore it was seldom taught by instructors.

There are many other drivers of course, fortunately the great majority, who also passed their driving tests in that era, but who do understand lane conventions.
 
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I've recently seen several reports of Octavia owners hearing a sloshing noise when the stop start operates. It turns out to be water filling up inside the rear doors. Removing the bottom seal has resulted in around a bucket full of water running out of the door. Hopefully something that has been fixed recently at the production line.
 

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Presume the stop/start is a red herring here, or was that found in the rear doors as well? ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
No sloshing sounds yet, but early Octavia Mk 4's had software problems and on Briskoda there are reports of cars being rejected, although some may be standard Octavia Mk 4's rather than iV's. The only fault on ours is with the Satnav, which cannot be programmed for favourites. It's going in next week to have the rear Nextbase camera fitted and it will be plugged in to their computer to check for faults. I'll be loaned a car as updates can take a long time. It's not a major problem since voice control accepts plain English commands, so for example if I ask for Morrisons Teeside Retail Park or a BP garage in Stockton, it would take me there. So far we are delighted with it. A very smooth ride despite the low-profile tyres and the transition between e-power and IC power is unnoticeable. Over the 264 miles we've driven, it's returned 103mpg (£15 of fuel) and used £6.20 of electricity, ie 8p/mile. which will drop pro rata to around 6p/mile when we have the Octopus Go off-peak rate of 5p/kWhr compared with the present 16.66p/kWhr. The PHEV is ideal for our driving pattern: full electric for short trips, up to around 30 miles and hybrid for longer journeys. In contrast, the diesel Yeti averaged 36mpg during the period we owned it and the Karoq 31 mpg (18p/mile), although much of the reason for the latter was short runs from cold in a hilly town during a year of lockdown.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The voice recognition is very good, accepting plain speech commands. In preparation for a day out today, I asked to be directed to Riveaulx Abbey and it was identified immediately. The spelling is not intuitive, but the SatNav got it right. Impressive!
 

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The voice recognition is very good, accepting plain speech commands. In preparation for a day out today, I asked to be directed to Riveaulx Abbey and it was identified immediately. The spelling is not intuitive, but the SatNav got it right. Impressive!
Be careful if you ask for Stamford Bridge - didn't someone end up at the battlefield (1066) rather than Chelsea football ground or is that urban myth
 

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Hi Jimmy,

Nice motor! Shame about the colour? :ROFLMAO:(y)
That’s a bit harsh. I am told that it is the preferred colour of drug dealers’ Audi Q7s. 😀
 

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Be careful if you ask for Stamford Bridge - didn't someone end up at the battlefield (1066) rather than Chelsea football ground or is that urban myth
Quite likely true! The "real" Stamford Bridge is a large village/small town between York and Hull and the site of the first battle for the realm of England in 1066. When Harold II beat off the invading Viking army of Harold Hadrada. Before speed marching his victorious army south for the other battle near Hastings 3 weeks later. When his exhausted army were famously beaten by William of Normandy, also a Scandinavian by birth and ancestry. But not till after Harold II had taken a fatal wound with an arrow through the eye (if the Bayeux Tapestry is accurate?)

It is debateable which of the three had the more legitimate claim on the English throne. All of them had some credibility.

As for a football ground in London? Does anyone care? :ROFLMAO:
 

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The battle at Stamford Bridge was within days of the Battle of Fulford, the army covered a lot of ground before they turned to go South. I feel it was one of those things that could go other ways than it did. I think there is a football ground somewhere in London.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Many years ago BAe had a factory in Brough, E Riding of Yorkshire. I was based at Warton Aerodrome and colleagues regularly went to Brough. Unfortunately, in the days before satnavs, the only Brough I knew was in Cumbria. Fortunately I left BAE before I was roped in to go to the aforementioned factory. As for the colour of our Octy, I always had white cars until my second company car and our Roomster & first Yeti were white. The reasons are we like the colour, it complements the lines of the car, it is clearly visible from a distance, contrary to beliefs it is easy to keep clean and drivers tend to behave or give way as it may be an undercover police car. :)
 

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Undercover Police cars in Dorset are either black or dark grey,Usually Fords or BMWs.
I know!!!:rolleyes:
 

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Around here they can be any colour and are generally Fords, Volvos or Audis, although I have seen an Octavia VrS down south so could have been South Wales Police.
 
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