Yeti Owners Club banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
568 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
3959
Picture of a parked car, not in Enfield,what can't be seen is the road junction to the left. Similar parking is common on most roads but I rarely see a parking ticket. The Road Traffic Act and Highway Code don't seem to agree if this is illegal.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,140 Posts
White Merc = professional footballer or drug dealer car. Whichever, the owner probably has a disregard for the finer points of the Highway Code, or seldom considers the safety of others when choosing where to leave it.

Judgemental? Right now today, you bet!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
880 Posts
At least its not parked half on the pavement!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
880 Posts
Its a white van :eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
568 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I remember seeing a car being lifted and removed from a parking bay, I don't know what he'd done wrong. As soon as the car was gone another one of the same colour and make parked there. I'm sure there was some head scratching when the first driver came back.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
I remember seeing a car being lifted and removed from a parking bay, I don't know what he'd done wrong. As soon as the car was gone another one of the same colour and make parked there. I'm sure there was some head scratching when the first driver came back.
That remided me of an incident many years ago when I was an apprentice in a firm of Surveyors.. The boss had a mini estate and staff were allowed to borrow it to visit building sites. One of the lads borrowed it one day and when he returned, told the boss that he had to park it one floor up in the multi storey car park. The next morning the boss said to him that he could not find his mini until he returned to where he had originally parked it. Turned out the chap had "borrowed" someone elses mini so they must have had matching keys. The other owner must have been baffled when he eventually found his car but not where he had parked it.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
13,732 Posts
With all the parked vehicles, runners, cyclists, motorbility buggies, and electric scooterists using the pavements the traffic is now getting a bit heavy for pedestrians to safely walk along the road.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,140 Posts
That remided me of an incident many years ago when I was an apprentice in a firm of Surveyors.. The boss had a mini estate and staff were allowed to borrow it to visit building sites. One of the lads borrowed it one day and when he returned, told the boss that he had to park it one floor up in the multi storey car park. The next morning the boss said to him that he could not find his mini until he returned to where he had originally parked it. Turned out the chap had "borrowed" someone elses mini so they must have had matching keys. The other owner must have been baffled when he eventually found his car but not where he had parked it.
1960’s Minis, Ford Anglias and Mk1 Cortinas had only seven different key cut patterns between the millions of them. So 1 in 7 chance any two cars would use the same key. A friend I shared a house with at Uni had an Anglia with a door lock key that matched my Mini’s key exactly. We regularly used to prank each other by driving home each other’s cars. Especially when they were parked side by side in the car park.

Each of my three 1970s Ford Escort Mk1 RS2000s had same style door “locks”. That could be locked or unlocked with either a penny or flat blade screwdriver. Although the last two also had additional, aftermarket Yale locks on each door, that pushed a bolt from the door frame into the B-pillar.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Slaphead

·
Administrator
Joined
·
13,732 Posts
Ford didn't do much better with the key that had a flat sided rectangle on the end. There were four cutting depths along the key on each corner, and both sides were the same. 1 was no cut, then 2,3,4, were deeper as the number increased. Someone would come along for a test drive, look at the key and memorise 1,4,3,2, or similar, and go away and get a key cut to that profile and steal the car. Ford later put a "chip" in the keys to make it a bit more difficult, the master key being the one with the red plastic dome in the centre of the fob..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
887 Posts
1960’s Minis, Ford Anglias and Mk1 Cortinas had only seven different key cut patterns between the millions of them.
And the Ford Corsair. I used to park it in a work car park that was long, narrow and uphill from the in/out gate. People would park their cars nose in on both left and right sides.
On a day when I had booked the afternoon off to fit a new clutch to the Corsair, I went to the car park at lunchtime only to find an empty space where I had parked my car. For a short time I wondered if I had ridden the motor bike to work but remembered parking next to a Triumph Herald. Someone had pinched my car!

I started to walk down the car park towards the gate when a car drove in. My car! I turned and ran after my car but the driver must have seen me. He stopped at the top of the car park and ran off jumping the fence and running straight across a busy road. I was only a few steps behind so ignored my car and continued to chase him. He'd been lucky with the traffic but I wasn't prepared to run into the traffic as he had done, and by the time I'd crossed the road he had disappeared.

I turned to go back to my car only to be accosted by Giant Haystacks (or his brother). He turned out to be a plain clothes police man and I explained the situation after he asked why I was chasing that man. He then radioed his uniformed colleagues who caught up with the thief who had turned his distinctive jacket inside out but was panting like a mad thing after his run. He also had a large bunch of Ford and BMC keys. He knew that the car park was a work one and that people would usually leave their cars there all day, so he borrowed them, parking them back in the same spot after his joy ride, shopping or whatever. He'd done the same thing to numerous cars from that car park and was on probation - for taking cars. Apparently he did go back to prison.

Meanwhile - - - - - When I ran past my car I did not notice it moving, but the thief had not bothered to apply the handbrake. My Corsair ran backwards down the car park, aiming to the RH side. It scraped across the rear end of a Rover 2000, removing the number plate surround and the (bolt on) off side rear wing. The next car was sticking out a bit further so my car hit the rear nearside wing and pushed that car into the next one and the next again one.
All the car owners were found and turned up to survey the damage. Not surprisingly, none were very happy. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
568 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
3967
Ever had a note left on your windscreen? This car parked across four bays did.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,523 Posts
Ford later put a "chip" in the keys to make it a bit more difficult, the master key being the one with the red plastic dome in the centre of the fob..
I got baffled one day, i had a Escort Ghia and a works Escort van, opened the door of the car and jumped in driver seat turned ignition on and nothing.
It took me a few minutes before i realised i had the van key.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
About 2000, I returned to my company car Mondeo special edition, in a rare colour, got in started the engine before noticing it was rather untidy inside. My car was a few bays away!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,523 Posts
At work one night called out we were doing a job on the road, there was a car parked right where we needed to be. We called the police who came out and got reg number for the address, he went there but no one in, so he suggested we "bounce" the car out of the way.
Well once we started bouncing it, it was like bouncing a ball and was moving easy, the policeman was in stitches when we never stopped and bounced it to the next street.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
We had to move a triumph herald years goo which stupidly parked outside the pub in the car park and was blocking in our car. As we bounced it out of the way both rear shocks came apart with the rods coming out of the casing. Left quick before owner returned, however he wouldn’t have realised until he went over the first bump. I doubt if they were actually doing anything anyway!
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top