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It’s the same with all ISPs. It is BT who make the charge and not the ISP. The whole thing is made more difficult because the ISPs have to get BT Wholesale to check out the BT network and they are the ones who call out the local engineer who is in a different part of theIf system.

I had an slow speed issue with my ASDL broadband a few years ago. I reported it to Plusnet who reported it to BT Wholesale, who said there was nothing wrong with the line, so Plusnet said they could do no more. I knew there were noise problems with the local overhead route and said that I would work the BT engineer to prove it. I wasn’t allowed to contact BT Wholesale direct and Plusnet wouldn’t do any more. I eventually contacted a very senior manager at BTs HQ who gave me the BT Wholesale’s manager’s ‘secret‘ phone number. When I explained the problem to her, she agreed and sent the local engineer out.
Edit; it was on talking to him that he informed me that BT owned Plusnet, where i was getting it for about £10/mth cheaper than BT.
When the engineer turned up, I asked him if he was going to carry out a psophometric test (low level noise). He looked at me blankly, clearly not understanding, and opened up his laptop which had three smiley faces on the screen and then told me that if all three were smiling, the line was OK, but if one was frowning there would be a problem.

Between us, we did manage to pinpoint the issue soon after and when the cable was replaced on that stretch of overhead line, all was well.

What a system!
Some years ago i had exactly the same from Plusnet (could not fault them anything else but they are only following procedure) slow speed (even though 2.5mbs was great at that time, when it dropped there was a difference) My main socket is in front bedroom (as that was the easiest place to put it when we built house and had a wire to caravan on site through window) and i have extension wire running through the front bedroom and then in to back where router is and pc.
They asked me to do test and then test for 5 days at master socket which i then had to put router in bedroom and pc and close any thing connected to it and not use internet.
There was no difference as i had done the test before and knew that there is no drop.
Told me BT would charge £75 if fault on my side to which i informed them no fault at all internally.
BT engineer came and identified faulty main socket, he renewed it with the new at that time box with filter in, and as i had pc in back bedroom he said that he would re wire around the outside (nearly 3 walls) to my router, i did not want wires through wall so he left me the wire and i ran it under skirting boards.

Recently had similar with sky recently, i informed them that i was not going through a series of tests when no fault on my line, they said no problems in area and must be internal. I did speed check (via phone connection) which said no speed at all. Phoned them back and informed them of this and no one in area got internet (mobile signal ok, obviously fault at exchange as others wit different networks off. Just told them get on with it.
I had to contact sky the other day and he asked me if i was happy with service and i told him about the previous no connection and he gave me £10 off my nex bill.
 

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Sometimes I wonder if we have advanced at all. The Memsahib was coming up our drive one day to find the overhead cable to our landline snapped with both ends lying on the ground. She rang BT’s faultline on her mobile, only to be told by the person at some strange location in the world that the fault was in our house. My wife said that it wasn’t because she was holding the broken end of the cable in her hand. The person at the other end said “it can’t be because my computer says the fault is in your house... Hmmmm...

I started off my working life in a telephone exchange in the 1960s. In those days, when you reported a fault, you would speak to an experienced engineer who was on light duties sat at the fault desk. By flicking a few switches, he could actually diagnose a fault down to a few tens of yards. There was no “computer says NO” in those days.
 

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Sometimes I wonder if we have advanced at all. The Memsahib was coming up our drive one day to find the overhead cable to our landline snapped with both ends lying on the ground. She rang BT’s faultline on her mobile, only to be told by the person at some strange location in the world that the fault was in our house. My wife said that it wasn’t because she was holding the broken end of the cable in her hand. The person at the other end said “it can’t be because my computer says the fault is in your house... Hmmmm...

I started off my working life in a telephone exchange in the 1960s. In those days, when you reported a fault, you would speak to an experienced engineer who was on light duties sat at the fault desk. By flicking a few switches, he could actually diagnose a fault down to a few tens of yards. There was no “computer says NO” in those days.
I worked in the water industry for 40 years and you got to know many from other Utilities.
Around 80's 90's BT had a bloke with a box van with all the plans in, and if you needed the road marking for BT lines he would come and trace and mark the highway with two lines (1 metre apart showing the line), when he retired and you asked BT for location they then sent plans of the highway with shaded area of the full road and verge/footpath. Useless.
 

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It was all about cutting costs. Most of the staff became ‘generalist’ and so the experts took their skills with them when they retired. The example of the three smiley faces I gave earlier was proof of that. In the 60s a typical Strowger (electro-mechanical) exchange would employ thirty technicians of different grades, overseen by a manager and his secretary. By the late 70s, an electronic exchange of similar capacity would employ one technical officer, overseen by a manager who probably had one or more other exchanges in his control.

Mind you, in the early 60s, it would cost you £105 to have a line installed in your house. That is probably the equivalent of a couple of thousand now. Can you imagine anyone paying that for a landline to be installed now?
 
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