Yeti Owners Club banner

1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited by Moderator)
Just got YETI 2015 4x4 L&K Manual 150bhp/110kw in SKODA R/worth Notts back in Nov19 with only 23000 miles on clock, the car drove beautifully back to Ireland but now every 2 hours of driving nearly all the Dashboard lights light up ,the Glow light will start flashing yellow ,then a constant TPM......ENGINE EMISSIONS ABS Traction Control Power Steering.

It will then go into limp home mode and struggles to go up hills. Eventually pull over and switch off/on lights disappear for a while and come back a few miles later....

Have done an OBD Eleven check which was,nt able to cancel out. An Indy garage did a VCDS diagnostics and suggest an EGR clean or replacement......???

Should this sort my problems out....?? Or do I need to change anything else whilst this is being done...

Your thoughts please.....
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,306 Posts
Euro 5 engine? (if you don't have an AdBlue tank in the boot it is Euro 5) Change over was 2015 which is why I ask.

If bought from Rainworth and Euro 5 will have had Emissions fix activated. 23k not a lot for a diesel but that isn't necessarily a good thing as they need to get properly hot for regens to clear the DPF and low, short distance miles don't help. VAG offered warranty to replace DPF and EGR on "fixed" vehicles for two years from date of fix being applied but chances are you are outside that time period if it was done early in recall. If your OBD is compatible try it with VAG DPF (Android phones/tablets only) to see state of DPF.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,557 Posts
Before doing anything else. Check the battery voltage.
If as low as 12v or less after an overnight “rest” - get a new battery.
Or less than 14v with the engine running - check the alternator is charging properly.
Urrell and/or LlaniGraham use to have a chart of acceptable and unacceptable battery voltage levels, and their conclusions. One of the early symptoms of low battery voltage is random and intermittent warning lights. Especially for anything connected with the ABS or traction control systems. Long before engine starting becomes an issue.

Shame not so easy to just take it back to Mansfield and let RW sort it out? Brexit May mean Rainworth are less able to come to an arrangement with a local garage. But I’m not very convinced that would ever have been possible anyway.

A garage would say “EGR valve” if one of the lights was emissions, as that would be lots of lucrative man hours for them. Particularly on a 4x4 as half the transmission has to come out to get to the EGR valve.

To check DPF health, that would also give an indirect and vague clue to the EGR being sooted up, or not. Get a cheap Bluetooth transmitter with ELM 327 capability, to plug into the OBD port. You may have one already to run the fault code checks? Then link that to the VAG DPF smartphone app. (Only available on Android devices, not Apple). Then buy a bottle of Archoil 6400 D-max fuel treatment. Run that into a tankful of fuel and take it for a good long, open highway drive where the engine gets good and hot. If it will let you? While watching VAG DPF intermittently to check how long it needs to perform a regen on the DPF. That can also help clear a sticking EGR a little bit, but only if the clogging is not too bad to begin with. If it is, the valve may still need to come out for a clean or replace (cost not that much greater if time is being charged for the work).

What is your typical daily journey pattern like? Lots of short, under 10k trips only with no longer trips regularly, would mean you’ve bought a modern diesel when something else may have been better? Plenty of longer journeys means you do have the right car/engine.

After those, I start to give up. If problem persists, it may be time to bite the bullet and let a specialist take another look? I’m sure there will be others with better ideas along soon. If not chipped in already while I write this essay? Edit: as suspected, two excellent suggestions already in......

Also see my comments in the recent discussion in here with DidneYeti, labelled something like “Hello - Skoda Approved Used Yeti”, about the risks of buying Diesel engined cars advertised as “low mileage”.
Don’t want to panic or worry you unduly, but 23,000 over 5 years is a little on the low side of healthy in my view. others may have other opinions of course. Emission controlled Diesels generally thrive better on higher mileages.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,694 Posts
Hi, welcome to the forum, you have already had quite a response.

Did you get a Skoda warranty with it, if you did is it still valid? It would also be a good idea to see when the emissions fix was applied.
If you were still over here Rainworth would have been responsible for any fault present or developing for a period of six months from the date of purchase under your consumer rights.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,557 Posts
But isn't the 150bhp engine Euro 6?
Ooooh Good Point! In which case my usual rants about the EA189 emissions fix are irrelevant - and about to be edited back out.
EGR stuff still relevant though?
Does anyone know how Archoil interacts with AdBlue? I should have thought OK. But need to go read the sheet that comes with every bottle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
It has SCR and ADBLUE not DPF
OBD Eleven came up with
Trouble codes:
01325 - Tire Pressure Monitoring Control Module No signal/communication
static
00290 - Left rear ABS wheel speed sensor Implausible signal
static
03 Brakes 1

System description: ESP MK60EC1
Software number: 1K0907379CB
Software version: 0174
Hardware number: 1K0907379CB
Hardware version: H46
Long coding: 933F400E092501FEC90F02EA9020809AA1015021

Trouble codes:
02214 - Tire pressure warning Lower limit not reached
static

01 Engine Control Module 1

System description: R4 2,0L EDC
Software number: 04L906016HP
Software version: 1791
Hardware number: 04L907309K
Hardware version: H20
ODX name: EV_ECM20TDI01104L906016HP
ODX version: 001003
Long coding: 01190032043701090000

Trouble codes:
P048A00 - Exhaust Pressure Control Valve "A" Stuck Closed
static
Date: 2048-12-04 17:06:52
Mileage: 39814 km
Priority: 2
Malfunction frequency counter: 3
Unlearning counter: 255
Engine speed: 829.50 1/min
Normed load value: 20.4 %
Vehicle speed: 0 km/h
Coolant temperature: 77 °C
Intake air temperature: 41 °C
Ambient air pressure: 1000 mbar
Voltage terminal 30: 13.100 V
Dynamic environmental data: 20962810F90EB211D8000017F71BF2123100A112333728070011D71485
P047F00 - Exhaust Pressure Control Valve "A" Stuck Open
Intermittent
Date: 2048-12-04 18:47:08
Mileage: 39916 km
Priority: 2
Malfunction frequency counter: 1
Unlearning counter: 255
Engine speed: 1387.00 1/min
Normed load value: 0.0 %
Vehicle speed: 63 km/h
Coolant temperature: 88 °C
Intake air temperature: 22 °C
Ambient air pressure: 1010 mbar
Voltage terminal 30: 14.920 V
Dynamic environmental data: 20962810F9149A11D8000017F71BF2123100A11233372C070011D75419
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,694 Posts
Battery low voltage can cause all sorts of problems, does your Yeti have stop/start (the preferable answer would be no). Are you able to test the resting voltage? There are a lot of electronics in a Yeti and they drain the battery when it is standing idle. How many miles have you done since November?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,557 Posts
The ABS and TPMS fault codes are common, but not exclusively so, false errors associated with a low battery voltage. So my mates in the trade tell me. Could be real. Could be false? Impossible to be sure without knowing the battery health also.

What happened to the TPMS error when you checked and sorted the tyre pressures with a proper gauge? Where any tyres actually adrift of suitable pressure or different side to side?

Dunno about the EPC valve duo. But those dates suggest the ECU is well confused about something. So could be getting its knickers in a twist about something different? Possibly the battery?

Did your reader refuse to clear those codes? Or cleared them then they came straight back soon after? You mentioned in the OP that the dashboard warnings do disappear occasionally? Could that be when the battery is feeling relatively healthy?

No DPF? Really? That sounds very odd? Possibly even illegal (in UK)? If you look over the top of the engine towards the bulkhead, is there a bright metal oval to rectangular shaped box, about 20cm ish across, between the turbo’s hot side and the brake master cylinder reservoir? Wrapped in heat insulation with another metal layer around that? If so, that’ll be the DPF? Or is the DPF lower downstream on the 150ps SCR equipped engine?

- AdBlue used via SCR eliminates/dramatically reduces NOx emissions by the time exhaust gasses reach the tail pipe.

- DPF controls particulate emissions (soot or smoke).

- Not the same kind of “emissions” at all. Just happen to both be found in the exhaust (of petrol engines too, to a lesser degree in the case of particulates now that tetraethyl lead has been eliminated). Both kind of control systems for each kind of emissions normally work in tandem. Not one instead of the other.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
The Stop/Start battery has been checked......(SCR) AdBlue indicator has not indicated Low.
DPF Light has never come on to indicate clogged/soot yet ..............always Glow Plug Light
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,097 Posts
DPF Light has never come on to indicate clogged/soot yet ..............always Glow Plug Light
The glow plug light is used to warn of lots of problems.
But when I had a glow plug fail the light did NOT come on!
Nor does it stop on to let you know the glow plugs are working, it goes off the same on every start up even when starting is delayed by the need for more heat!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,557 Posts
a) The Stop/Start battery has been checked.....
b) (SCR) AdBlue indicator has not indicated Low.
c) DPF Light has never come on to indicate clogged/soot yet ..............always Glow Plug Light
A) When? By whom? What were the readings for resting voltage immediately after shut down and after an overnight rest before starting up? What were the voltage readings while charging system was running? Is it an AGM battery? Or the cheaper “EFB” sort, that are half way between a traditional non S/S lead-acid battery and an AGM?

B) That’ll be the AdBlue level indicator in the tank. Or warning of low level. Not an indication of how well the SCR system is working. :)

C) Urrell has responded very adequately on glow plug lights covering a multitude of possible sins. Anything but the glow plugs in many cases. :confused:

So it does have a DPF then? As well as SCR. :)

D)
  • How many miles / kilometres per day does the car currently cover daily?
  • What sort of journey length typically?
  • Is it used every day, or does it spend lots of days not being driven?
  • Does the battery get chance for a proper charge up between shut downs? Even when the S/S system is functioning?
  • Are the multiple fault symptoms eased if you disable S/S immediately after every proper start up and leave it disabled for the duration of every journey?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Think its the original Varta AGM S/S 70AH......and my local Skoda Dealer checked the battery although did,nt get the actual readings of resting etc. But always starts/turns over 1st time.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,557 Posts
They always do, start the engine easily enough. On modern cars with advanced electrics, that’s the last symptom of declining battery health.
Was it tested on a day when it was feeling a bit better after a drive to the dealer? How far away is the dealer location?

Original battery, 5 years old? Stop/Start? Low mileage?
Random ABS and TPMS errors?
The evidence for that being the first thing to suspect is growing by the minute m’Lud. :)

How about explaining all this to Rainworth?
Asking them to ship you, or pay for a new battery?
You meet them half way, metaphorically speaking, by paying for it to be fitted by your local Skoda dealer?
I seem to remember AGM batteries have to be coded to the stop/start car? So can’t fit DIY? But I could be wrong on that?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,557 Posts
How is storm Ciara over there just now?
Coming our way - winds are starting to pick up outside now.
Lots of sporting events here due on Sunday been cancelled already, on the strength of the forecast alone.

If (she) has been given an Irish name can we blame you guys? :D :ROFLMAO:
Or is she all America’s export?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,557 Posts
One further thought.
The ECU won’t trigger a DPF regen if there are other fault codes it thinks are present. Real or imagined. Even when the DPF soot loading is calculated over 100% full. (I saw our DPF get as high as 120% last year, with the car still running fine. When the ECU had what it thought was a MAF sensor fault - that turned out to be false too. The real fault was a failed component within the ECU itself). So the longer this goes on, the more likely you are to head into a real problem with the DPF. Even if that hasn’t reached 100% yet. Hence why VAG DPF can be so handy.

If it does turn out to be the battery, you may be better off seeking out an auto electrical specialist? More likely in my experience to get a straight answer than at a typical franchise dealer (some of those are better than others!).

Do keep us informed how you get on. It would be good to know if any of these theories hold water.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Ciara fizzling out now, some flights/ferries cancelled, Welsh Ladies match still going ahead.....
If this does prove to be all ERG related would it be better to get it remapped to avoid expensive replacement and same happening in another year or 2...??
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,557 Posts
Ciara passed through overnight and early morning. Still gusty, but rain stopped now. Although plenty of water on ground. A whole sky full in fact.

As your car is a Euro6 spec with SRC and AdBlue. It will not have needed / had the EA189 emissions “fix” in the first place. Hence nothing to remove with a remap.

Although if you do a lot of short trips, you may want to get into the habit of switching OFF the stop/start every time you get into the car. Not just to reduce the drain on the battery and let that have better chance to get charged. More because stop/start actually INCREASES emissions, particularly while the engine and exhaust are not properly warmed up.

The original, hugely discredited, official fuel consumption and CO2 type approval tests did not consider NOx a pollutant to worry about. Furthermore, they were only ever run on thoroughly warmed up engines. Never one that had just started from cold. Only in conditions where the engine is already up to full operating temperature AND the remaining mock journey on test consisted of some 30-40% of the trip stopped at theoretical traffic lights, etc. did stop/start show a very marginal reduction in fuel consumption. In real world conditions there is none.

What is worse, properly conducted university studies in Australia have shown that every time the car switches itself off, the exhaust temperature in the catalytic converter and SCR drop below the critical level they need to work. The so called “light off” point. It then takes a further 5-minutes driving, with NO further stops, before the regular cat and SCR get back up to light off temperature again. During all that time the tail pipe is emitting pollutants that have been unaffected by the catalysts. That totally offsets any very marginal reduction in pollutant output for the odd minute the engine is off, when it would otherwise have been on tickover, keeping the exhaust gas temperature up around 250 degrees. Even worse, it INCREASES the overall journey pollution quite markedly.

Worse still on an engine that is still coming up to full temperature from a cold start. Because it means the catalysts take even longer before they get hot enough to begin working. Possibly even the entire journey with no cat reduction of pollutants.

Hence stop/start is one of the worst inventions of the last 50 years. Only created to get cars on the totally unrealistic test, into a one step lower tax band for benefit in kind company cars on fuel consumption and CO2. Totally unachievable in real world driving anyway.

Running with Stop/start OFF will actually REDUCE your overall emissions for a trip. Proven!

Rant over :D . Soap box back under its shelf till the next time.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top