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Advice appreciated please!

YS17 CHD Skoda Yeti Outdoors SE L Tdi Scr 4x4 Sa automatic Diesel
Bought new from Bristol Street Motors Derbyshire May 2017

50K miles September 2021
Major Service due October 21

I plan to keep the Yeti up to 100K miles.
Please advise me what I should do in addition to the service. All thoughts welcome. I am not able to do any work myself due to advancing years.

Possibles: (pinched from previous discussions on the site)

1 Haldex oil filter at around 4 years or 54,000 miles

2 Rear diff oil change

3 The clutch slave cylinder: replacing seals on the master cylinder

4 The diff oil has no service schedule, indicating that the original oil is to be retained for the lifetime of the vehicle. Change it anyway?

5 Replace DP filters (what are these?)

6 Replace cambelt, driving belt and timing belts

7 Aircon serviced

7 New Battery

8 Change water pump

9 Service DSG gearbox * and replace oil
From Yeti owners website: I have a diesel Skoda Yeti SE TDI CR 110 4x4 which had just suffered a catastrophic gearbox failure. It only has about 30,000 miles on the clock and has been dealer serviced. The repair is going to cost £5000 and only £2000 is covered by the warranty.
The fault seems to be a broken oil seal resulting in complete loss of lubricant and subsequent gearbox failure. Has anyone else had similar problems - I bought this car because I wanted something reliable and am seriously fed up with what has happened
www.yetiownersclub.co.uk:

10 Suggest any others
 

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2015 Elegance Greenline II
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There is no Haldex filter on your car as you have Haldex 5, just a screen to clean.
 

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DP Filters - presume you mean Diesel Particulate Filter which isn't a simple replacement unit like an air filter. The one thing to do to keep this clean is frequently drive the car twenty/thirty miles keeping revs high and the DPF will "regenerate" itself cleaning out the soot particles. You could by a cheap OBD2 dongle and a copy of VAG DPF on an Android smart phone to monitor the condition.

Flintstone and others with high mileage Yetis ( and 100k doesn't count) will I'm sure offer more advice but frequency of oil change is part of their regular maintenance not sticking to the Skoda 10K/1 year minimum intervals.
 

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As Snowgood says a dongle and VAG DPF app, will help you monitor the health of your DPF.
Haldex oil change and filter clean is a must if you want to maintain your 4x4 capabilities.
Cam belt and water pump best done together so quite a chunk of money.
 

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Disclaimer: I am a yeti novice, but I have owned and maintained my own VW's for the last 30 years or so.

Battery, Aircon, clutch slave /master cylinder seals are all things that may well eventually pack up/ leak/ require servicing but while they're working properly no point in changing them for the sake it. You would be charged for each as a separate job whether you have them done along with the service or not, individually or all together.

The Water pump is usually driven by the cam belt. The major cost of a cam belt change is the labour involved so it makes sense to have the water pump changed at the same time as changing the cam belt because the cost difference is just the price of the water pump - no more labour. Similarly changing the fan belt etc at the same time shouldn't attract additional labour charges.

As far as DPF's , diffs and Haldex's I will leave that for the yeti experts to comment on.

hope that helps a bit.
 

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only a 100k?, Pah, one member has one at 400k and another at around 300k and plenty of examples can be found with mileages in excess of 100k. You may as well keep it until it is ready for the scrap yard and owes you nothing by then.
I mean what are you going to replace it with that is as versatile and good? ;)
 

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Yeti 2017 2.0TDi 4x4 L&K DSG
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DSG service a must every 40k miles
Haldex every 3 years or 30k miles
Cambelt and waterpump every 5 years.
 

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I honestly wonder how we survived in the past without worrying about service schedules?

Just used to buy cars and battery or exhaust or a bit of rust was the main concern!
 

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Yeti S+ 2010 2.0TDi CR110 2WD Manual
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I honestly wonder how we survived in the past without worrying about service schedules?
We didn't (survive). Or the cars didn't. ;)
In the 1950's cars were worn out and needed a complete overhaul by 30,000 miles.
In the 1960's cars needed a new exhaust every 12 months. Warranties lasted 6-months if you were lucky.
In the 1970's many rusted out by 6-7 years old and needed to be thrown away (any Vauxhalls, Lancia Beta, Datsuns, BL 1100s, BL Princesses that had stool on a airfield for 12-months before being sold.

I can distinctly remember as an early teenager in the 60's, writing away to Castrol and receiving back a "lubrication chart" for each of my dad's cars. Those showed grease and drain points, and where to find them, with mileages when each would need attention. Suspension and steering joints every 1000 miles, oil changes every 3000 or later 6000 miles, etc. When I made my own downhill soap-box racer out of old pram wheels, a 4"x4" fence post and various bits of scrap timber, it had a registration number on the back, and its own handbook (a small hard back notebook) with a service schedule for greasing the wheel bearings, re-tightening the wheel spokes, etc.

MOT tests were introduced to curb uncaring owners who ignored maintenance schedules and just ran their car until a vital component failed. Or a bald tyre wore through and burst.
 
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I can distinctly remember as an early teenager in the 60's, writing away to Castrol and receiving back a "lubrication chart" for each of my dad's cars. Those showed grease and drain points, and where to find them, with mileages when each would need attention. Suspension and steering joints every 1000 miles, oil changes every 3000 or later 6000 miles, etc.
I used to have a 1966 Series 2A Landrover.

That was oil change and points setup every 3000miles / 3 months. Plugs/points and airfilter every 12k miles or 12 months.
Never mentioned but timing and carb setup every 12 months,

Tappet adjustment annually.

Gearbox and diffs every two years

And most importantly a crawl underneath every two months to get at all the grease points with the grease gun.
 

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Not forgetting the lovely job of decarbing and valve regrinding at regular intervals.... oh yes, and riveting new brake linings onto brake shoes: epoxy resin hadn't, been invented, and few cars affordable by most people had disc brakes.
 

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Ah, the good old days! Just think 50 years from now people will look back at the cars we drive and be making similar comments.
 

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Okay, here's my prediction.

In less than 50 years from now, and I estimate this will be possible, in far less time, say 20 years, this will be the scenario.

All cars will not only be capable of full self driving, they will be so well designed and constructed that little will be allowed to go wrong for both safety and environmental reasons, plus they will also have artificial intellegence. If something is wrong the car will self diagnose itself and once it's dropped you off at home it will tell you what the problem is by talking to you. If it's only say an air filter which has reached it's blockage limit and needs to be replaced it will schedule a convenient repair time with you for a replacement. If it's something more serious, like the brakes reaching a wear limit, the car will tell you that it needs a repair now. It will then drive itself to a repair station where it will tell the intelligent humanoid robots working there what it needs. They will then carry out the repair and the car will then drive itself back to your home, park itself on your drive and let you know it's back.
 

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I used to have a 1966 Series 2A Landrover.

That was oil change and points setup every 3000miles / 3 months. Plugs/points and airfilter every 12k miles or 12 months.
Never mentioned but timing and carb setup every 12 months,

Tappet adjustment annually.

Gearbox and diffs every two years

And most importantly a crawl underneath every two months to get at all the grease points with the grease gun.
I wonder, did you ever think "i better fill a service record in" or just make sure all was ok and then move on to your next car when too much needed doing!
 

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Why would the robots be humanoid?
Mostly because the development of this type of technology with AI is already in progress and it's feasible to do it for motor manufacturing / repair, which will not only keep manufacturing / labour costs down, but also because it would be physically flexible enough to get into parts of a fully constructed car that a normal construction type robot, those which you currently see in factories, could not easily access, replacing a pollen filter under the dashboard for example. Car interiors and some exterior components still currently need to be human fitted and finished for this reason. It's not so much the robot / machine as much as the flexibility and shape.
 

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For sure, the human form is extremely versatile. But it did not evolve to become the optimal form for repairing cars.
Maybe a mass-produced humanoid robot would be good enough, but I think it would be possible to build one cheaper and more suited to the task without the humanoid form.

Today's car interiors are built by humans because it's cheaper, not because today's robots don't have the capability. Pollen filter included.

As a designer of automotive components myself, I have to consider (and write procedures for) how such parts can be replaced by human technicians using the skillsets in which they have been trained and the tools available to them in the dealer's workshop.
If the capabilities of the human were not a consideration, it would open up new possibilities for where components could be packaged, how they were fastened, perhaps even what they were made of. And this could potentially yield efficiency gains.

I would say it's not the flexibility and shape of the human form that results in humans being employed to repair cars, rather their intelligence, cognition, and relatively low cost. And the products have been designed to be assembled and repaired by them.

Anyway, I might be around to see what happens in twenty years time, but I hope I don't last fifty!
Perhaps nuclear fusion will have rendered energy efficiency irrelevant by then, or perhaps the concept of money and profitability will not have endured.
Or perhaps we'll all be under water and it won't really matter!

Have we wandered off topic?
 

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