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2017 Outdoor SEL TDi150 4x4 Manual
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so is Copperslip OK?
Depends on the location.

For locations involving ferrous metal to similar ferrous metal at low to moderate temperatures, then coppaslip/copperslip is fine as its ever been. Bolts or fastenings that you don’t want to corrode solid, perfect. I was using it on the undertray side screws on the Octavia on Thursday, and on both Yeti’s undertray screws the weekend before that.

For locations involving dissimilar metals in contact, such as pads to an aluminium alloy caliper, or an alloy wheel onto a steel hub, the received wisdom is the copper particles can act as an electrolytic conductor and actually promote corrosion and seizing. More modern anti-seize compounds, designed for high temperature applications like brake pads, such as Ceratec, are engineered to avoid that problem.

Here’s what Mintex have to say: Copper slip vs Ceratec: facts for the modern mechanic

For applications with rubber contact, such as the front Caliper slider pins, many pundits say copper slip gets affected by the heat and actually clags up the rubber, actually promoting sticking of the sliders. Traditionalists say red rubber grease is better for those for those places. Others say silicone grease. I’m not so sure about some silicone greases in a high temperature location such as brake callipers. So I either use no lube on those (the condition I believe the fronts left the factory?). Or if I’m feeling cautious a tiny smear of Ceratec on the slider pins too. Because that’s what I have to hand in the lubricants box (Along with with regular grease, coppaslip tube, battery terminal grease, rubber fit, GT85, WD40, muc-off bike chain lube, 3-in-1, silicone for the window runners, etc. Horses for courses, etc.).

As said earlier, the rear slider pins are a different ball game. Being sealed. I check those when the pads are out, for free movement. Then operate the principle of “If it ain’t broke - don’t fix it!”
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Thanks, got some Ceratec on order. One more question, once I have jacked the car up, to change the front brakes, where is the best place for axle stands to go? Last question, promise!
 

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2017 Outdoor SEL TDi150 4x4 Manual
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Thanks, got some Ceratec on order. One more question, once I have jacked the car up, to change the front brakes, where is the best place for axle stands to go?
Close as possible to the jack pad, allowing for the width of the jack and axle stand. Just a bit further along the sill’s downward pointing seam, towards the B-pillar at either end. The sills, and the seam, are the strongest parts of the body frame, and are designed with this in mind. (Not true of all cars, but true for the Yeti). There are some strong, subframe mounting points slightly more inboard, at the front, but nothing else suitable anywhere near the back. Having the stands more outboard helps with stability too.

DO NOT be tempted to place a stand anywhere near or under any of the rear suspension, particularly the main cross beam. (Risk of bending). Or diff itself, (not designed to take the weight, risk of damage). The rear spring cups, directly under the springs, are just about OK at a pinch. The angle of those means it is difficult to get a stand under safely when on full droop though. Even then, the sill is a far safer location. I normally try to place the dismounted wheel under the spring pans anyway, as a third line of defence, should the trolley jack, or axle stand fail. (Also makes a perfect place to stand the collection jar when bleeding brake fluid from the caliper during a pad swap or fluid replacement.)

What sort of jack are you using? Trolley jack or the car’s emergency jack? The car’s emergency jack has a lift pad specially shaped with a slot to hold firm on the sill seam. If using a trolley jack with a cup shaped lift pad, then a used ice hockey puck with a slot cut into it, across its diameter and around half its depth, makes an excellent method of engaging with the sill seam. Also works with jacks that have a flat platform lift pad. Depending on the shape of the the tops on your axle stands, a similar pad may or may not be highly useful? Search eBay for “VW rubber jack pad”. You’ll find plenty.

Since The Hood first found them advertised a few years ago, I’ve used one of these:
A really excellent little adapter for jacks or stands with a flat lift pad. Not least because the built-in magnets hold the adaptor in place on the sill, while you get the jack or stand perfectly placed beneath it. (The magnetic hold onto the sill is good enough in fact, that when the Octavia’s owner and I were replacing it’s front springs, in 2021. When we had finished, we let the car back down onto its wheels, then took it for a five mile test drive, to check all was OK. Later, when packing all my tools away, I noticed the jack pad was not where I normally keep it, in the box with the electric rattle gun. On grounds I usually need them both at roughly the same times. Looked around for a while and eventually found the pad, still held to the car’s sill by the magnets! )
 

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2017 Outdoor SEL TDi150 4x4 Manual
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Further thoughts for Octoman. Before he asks the question :) :D(y)

When replacing old, worn pads with new, it is essential to push the caliper pistons back to their innermost position. To allow the thicker new pads to be inserted. If you do not already have a decent piston pushing or “wind back” tool, then I strongly advise getting one. I use one like this with swappable diameter heads.
Except mine is a similar, but branded “Sykes-Pickavant” tool. Bought from a Halfords branch in Chippenham some 25-30 years ago. More professional kits with multiple diameter heads for different sizes of brake pistons are also available.

The front pistons can be pushed back without a rotating action. The rears however require a clockwise rotate at the same time as the push. Because they incorporate the parking brake mechanism inside the caliper. Hence the pegs on the face of the push back tool, that engage with slots in the piston, to rotate it at the same time as pushing. Only this type of tool can achieve that. The alternative “spreader” type simply won’t work. Nor will the old “home mechanic” bodge of squeezing the piston back with a pair of plumber’s or water pump pliers, from years ago.

When pushing or winding back the pistons, I also find it essential to crack open the adjacent brake fluid bleed nipple and push the fluid out, into a retaining jar as you would use for bleeding the hydraulic lines. This has several advantages:
1) Makes the push or wind back much easier due to less resistance.
2) On modern cars with ABS brakes, avoids pushing heat degraded or contaminated fluid back up into the ABS distribution valve block. Where it can harm or degrade the proper operation of the tiny, sensitive valves and pistons in there.
3) Avoids the risk of pushing fluid through the brake master cylinder in the “wrong” direction. Where that action has been known to flip the master cyl piston seals the wrong way. Which is a PITA* to fix. (* “Pain In The Arse” for those not familiar with the technical language. ;):()
4) Provides the perfect excuse to combine the pad swap with a 2-3 year brake fluid flush and renew. Which in my case, tends to fall due around the same time anyway. So two jobs in one hit, while you have the wheels off, etc. Also means you need less new fluid to completely flush the hydraulics, as the pistons are at their minimum point of travel inside the callipers.

Happy pad swapping. (y)
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Thanks for all the info folks. I do have another question but it's not relevant to the preceding one so I will find the section on windows and auto mirror folding and enter it there.
 
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