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Hello one and all,

I've long considered getting a Yeti, but never quite managed to get there. However, I am embarking on a business startup venture which make a suitable acquisition all but essential. A vital requirement is to have 4x4, and from various searching I have narrowed my choice down to 2 variants with the 2.0 engine; namely, TDI CR SE and TDI CR DPF SE.

So, my basic question would be - what extras does the 'DPF' offer...?

Both vehicles are 2013. Given what I've read about certain reliability issues, neded I have any concerns with this 'vintage'?

Thanks in advance ;-)
 

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Welcome to the Forum
Those 2 are the same, all Yeti's have DPF, it's the diesel particulate filter.
Later models from mid 2015 have SCR that injects Adblue into a catyliser in the exhaust to reduce the NOx pollution.
 

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Welcome to the forum Googles :)

Think Urrell has just narrowed your search for you. Sounds like just a variation in some dealers descriptions of the engine. Interested to hear why 4X4 is essential for your new venture but good luck with the search.
 

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Hello and welcome to the forum from another Newbie!

If you have the possibility of a good one, 4x4 or otherwise, within your budget then I would grab it. Of course, as said above, a later SCR/Euro6 would be nice!

My biggest problem was finding any good specimens within reasonable distance and budget. A 4x4 would not have been a stupid choice for me, due to where I live. However, I ended up with a 2WD 1.6TDI which is also fine for us and with the advantage of lower running costs. Last week I spoke to a local farmer's daughter who bought a 2013 4x4 about a year ago - she loves it and it's a hard working car. She said the same as me - difficult to find and paid over the odds.
 

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Just a small point about the 1.6, it is slightly lower than the other Yeti by about one inch, not a big deal unless ground clearance is critical. Also they only just got inside their emmissions clasification and were sold with low rolling resistance tyres with increased tyre pressures, plus if you bought one new, you could have a sunroof or spare wheel but not both, as due to the added weight it would no longer comply with the stated emssions. So if you find one with both, the sunroof will be factory fit and the spare wheel an after purchase addition.
 

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Googles,
As mentioned TDi CR SE DPF and TDi CR SE are potentially the same car. Whether or not the suffix DPF was added depended entirely on who was typing in the application for first registration with DVLA. As explained above, both cars will have a Diesel Particle Filter, so the difference in registration document suffixes means nothing.

CR stands for “Common Rail” which merely denotes what kind of fuel injection the car has. Again all the Yeti diesels have Common Rail, so that too makes no difference.

SE denotes the trim package and “extras” that the car left the factory with of course.

What may be more significant is what level of engine tune each has. The 2.0 TDi CR engines from that era came in three different engine performance levels. 110, 140 and 170 bhp. ALL with the same 2.0 litre cylinder capacity. The differences in power output are achieved by different fuel injection and turbo boost profiles held within the engine’s ECU. Later, the 170 version was dropped, when it and the 140 were replaced by a 150 bhp version.

The V5C document should in theory tell you that as well. Again though, it depends entirely on who filled in the original application for DVLA and how awake (or more likely not) they were at the time.
 

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The V5C document should in theory tell you that as well. Again though, it depends entirely on who filled in the original application for DVLA and how awake (or more likely not) they were at the time.
Apologies, off topic, but in 1990 I bought a new Honda CG125 for my daily commute. When checking the registration document, I discovered DVLC had recorded the means of propulsion as 'steam' :LOL:

Welcome to the Forum, Googles.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited by Moderator)
Welcome to the forum Googles :)

Think Urrell has just narrowed your search for you. Sounds like just a variation in some dealers descriptions of the engine. Interested to hear why 4X4 is essential for your new venture but good luck with the search.
My requirement for 4x4 is because the new venture will be an 'eco-educational' charity, concentrating on the marine environment. Consequently, from day-1 I will routinely need to drive off-road and often on wet sand in order to access collection / sampling sites. Furthermore, in the fullness of time I will have a requirement to tow off-road(small boat, trailer, etc.)
 

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Thanks. That sound a better reason than many who look for a 4X4 to keep them moving in winter weather.

The yeti 4X4 is permanant but a c90/10 split front to back n normal conditions. The Haldex unit uses sensors on the wheels to detect slippage on the front which then transfers more power to the rear, but you need to keep up the revs not back-off when you feel front wheel spin. The Haldex unit requires regular maintenance (oil change and filter clean or change depending model of Haldex fitted), if not pump failure can occur and there is nothing to indicate it isn't working so if buying check Haldex maintenance has been carried out.
 

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Thanks. That sound a better reason than many...
Indeed! Even as a confirmed “2WD on the right tyres” advocate, with the kind of purpose Googles has explained, I too would be considering a 4x4. Definitely a diesel. Probably a 140. To provide that availability of enough torque to pull through if a patch of wet sand turned a bit sticky, but without too much bhp to cause excess wheelspin. Winter tyres should also work well in those conditions too, in theory.
 

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If you want a 4x4 then get one, at the end of the day it's your money and you have to be content with your purchase.
I had the '2wd on winter tyres is better than a 4x4 on normal tyres' argument when I was looking or a Yeti, but to me that was irrelevant as I would never fit a Yeti with normal tyres anyway??
I bought my 2wd 2.0tdi as it was a great car in great condition at a price that was too good to ignore, I wanted a 140hp 4x4.
Having driven it for a few weeks I can't help but feel a bit disappointed it's not a 4x4.
 
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