Yeti Owners Club banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2015 1.2 Manual .. current mileage 69500 .. she has been very reliable since new and I would have bet my house that my Yeti would at least reach 100,000 without any major trauma. Just as well I didn't for in the past few months she has had bearings rattling in the gearbox plus nearside front wheel bearing and rear off-side wheel bearings replaced plus things like drop links renewed leaving not much change out of two and a half grand. It's obviously just a matter of time before the other two wheel bearings go and whatever else comes along - perhaps I should have listened to my - in this case 'better half' - to punt it in against a new vehicle when it had clocked up 65,000 miles.

Had I done - 'she who knows nuthin' - wouldn't have grounds for oft repeating her favourite mantra - 'I told you so' - :cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
Ouch, those four little words hurt, more so when you know they'll be repeated or many years to come.

As far as the Yeti goes, yes you'll probably find the other wheel bearings will need doing soon(ish).
I wonder if it spent time crossing fords, as they shouldn't have gone at that mileage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
65,000 miles should be as nothing for any modern(ish) car.

Wheel bearings should last the effective life of a car, I've not replaced any on any car I've had in the last 20 years or so and all have been run into 200,000 mile+ territory.

My previous Mk1 Octy was up to 337,000km (210k miles) when I sold it and the MKIV Golf I had before it 214.000 miles, no bearings on either. Both lived hard lives frequently towing caravans and car trailers. Never had to replace a clutch either.

Try this one on 'she who knows nuthin', balanced against what you would have lost in depreciation had you bought new 2.5k is a pittance, the same likely goes for the future maintenance costs too :unsure:

Buying new is a total mugs game but hey bless those who do as without them there wouldn't be the fantastic choice of used cars out there for the rest of us to buy :giggle:
 

·
Premium Member
Yeti S+ 2010 2.0TDi CFHA 110 2WD Manual
Joined
·
7,242 Posts
Kin_El - I can only agree with 95% of what you say there. Only problem is even those who choose to throw money at a brand new car as "first owner", can't do that so much just now. Do to supply running at below 60% of demand. Hence why used car prices are still rising so much.

I replaced both front wheel bearings on our Yeti at 149,000 miles, as one of them (left side) was starting to get noisy. I put that down partly to the way I tend to attack roundabouts. (My 1960's Mini Cooper used to get through left side front wheel bearings annually. Right side every 2nd year.) 100,000 or so later, no sign so far of the Yeti's bearings needing further attention.

Could it be that wheel bearings are another of those items where higher mileage cars have fewer problems, age for age, than those that spend a lot of time stationary?

Wee Yeti :) - was the gear box bearing issue 100% definitely diagnosed as needing attention? Or based on a suspicion due to bearing noise? For a few thousand miles before I replaced my Yeti's wheel bearings, I was convinced the noise was coming from the diff or gearbox. The sound was travelling along the driveshafts before being emitted to the human ear. It was only after detecting a very slight play in the wheel bearings that I then decided to change those first. The "gearbox" noise went away immediately and has never returned since.

Was it a manual gearbox or DSG? (I'm guessing manual if "fixed" for less that £2.5k?

ARB drop links are a regular "wear and tear" item on most modern cars. The Yetis cost around £20 per corner or less. I've replaced the fronts on our Yeti every 2-3 years or so. We do have a lot of speed humps around where we live. Those tend to reduce drop-link life significantly.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Llanigraham

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
Don't talk to me about road humps, Spain loves 'em very often doubling them as pedestrian crossings.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top