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Discussion Starter #1
Hi
I recently purchased a 2014 1.2 dsg Yeti
I’ve just found a bill for a new gearbox fitted at 44k by Skoda main dealer
There is 55k on the clock now & the gearbox seems fine to me .
Is this normal for a gearbox to last 44k & five years . It just got me thinking.
Thanks
 

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Certainly not normal but guess it can happen with any mechanical device.

The dual clutch is like a normal clutch and subject to wear especially if not treated right by leaving the car in D when stopped at traffic lights or in traffic jams. Good habit is to get into is to knock it into N in such circumstances until road is clear and you can move off. This is not the torque-converter type autobox and so should be driven slightly differently.
 

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Diesel has the wet box and needs oil change but the 1.2TSi is dry and supposedly sealed for life though it would appear life can be relatively short.
 

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Certainly not normal but guess it can happen with any mechanical device.

The dual clutch is like a normal clutch and subject to wear especially if not treated right by leaving the car in D when stopped at traffic lights or in traffic jams. Good habit is to get into is to knock it into N in such circumstances until road is clear and you can move off. This is not the torque-converter type autobox and so should be driven slightly differently.
There were some issues with earlier boxes and the wrong oil?
It's not neccessaary to put into N when stopped, as that also requires you to either have your foot on the brake, or apply the handbrake to stop the car rolling on a slope.
Wear only occurs when left in D, R or S and the handbrake is applied and footbrake released, as the car is trying to drive against the brake and slipping to stop the engine stalling.. Pressing on the footbrake disengages the clutches and leaves the car ready to move off as soon as pressure on the brake is released.
Better when stationary and on reasonably level ground is to select P which locks up the transmission, and then the foot can come off the brake. To move away, apply footbrake again, move lever to D and release footbrake to move off.
 

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There were some issues with earlier boxes and the wrong oil?
It's not neccessaary to put into N when stopped, as that also requires you to either have your foot on the brake, or apply the handbrake to stop the car rolling on a slope.
Wear only occurs when left in D, R or S and the handbrake is applied and footbrake released, as the car is trying to drive against the brake and slipping to stop the engine stalling.. Pressing on the footbrake disengages the clutches and leaves the car ready to move off as soon as pressure on the brake is released.
Better when stationary and on reasonably level ground is to select P which locks up the transmission, and then the foot can come off the brake. To move away, apply footbrake again, move lever to D and release footbrake to move off.
If stopped at traffic lights or a jam, would it not be more sensible to use N, to avoid wrecking your gearbox if you get rear ended.
 

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That's why I personally keep my foot on the foot brake all the time. Clutch is disengaged so gearbox protected. Car will not move as far if hit as all the brakes are engaged, not just the parking brake.
Anyway it seems a bit ott to worry about things like that? If the car is hit at the rear and gearbox damaged, it is just a higher bill either for insurance company or better still the car that hit you.
I have been driving for 46 years and well over 500k miles and have only been hit once in the rear, and that was when I had to brake suddenly and hadn’t even stopped at the time of the impact!
 
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