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Hi
I recently purchased a 2014 1.2 dsg Yeti
I’ve just found a bill for a new gearbox fitted at 44k by Skoda main dealer
There is 55k on the clock now & the gearbox seems fine to me .
Is this normal for a gearbox to last 44k & five years . It just got me thinking.
Thanks
 

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Certainly not normal but guess it can happen with any mechanical device.

The dual clutch is like a normal clutch and subject to wear especially if not treated right by leaving the car in D when stopped at traffic lights or in traffic jams. Good habit is to get into is to knock it into N in such circumstances until road is clear and you can move off. This is not the torque-converter type autobox and so should be driven slightly differently.
 
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Diesel has the wet box and needs oil change but the 1.2TSi is dry and supposedly sealed for life though it would appear life can be relatively short.
 

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Certainly not normal but guess it can happen with any mechanical device.

The dual clutch is like a normal clutch and subject to wear especially if not treated right by leaving the car in D when stopped at traffic lights or in traffic jams. Good habit is to get into is to knock it into N in such circumstances until road is clear and you can move off. This is not the torque-converter type autobox and so should be driven slightly differently.
There were some issues with earlier boxes and the wrong oil?
It's not neccessaary to put into N when stopped, as that also requires you to either have your foot on the brake, or apply the handbrake to stop the car rolling on a slope.
Wear only occurs when left in D, R or S and the handbrake is applied and footbrake released, as the car is trying to drive against the brake and slipping to stop the engine stalling.. Pressing on the footbrake disengages the clutches and leaves the car ready to move off as soon as pressure on the brake is released.
Better when stationary and on reasonably level ground is to select P which locks up the transmission, and then the foot can come off the brake. To move away, apply footbrake again, move lever to D and release footbrake to move off.
 

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There were some issues with earlier boxes and the wrong oil?
It's not neccessaary to put into N when stopped, as that also requires you to either have your foot on the brake, or apply the handbrake to stop the car rolling on a slope.
Wear only occurs when left in D, R or S and the handbrake is applied and footbrake released, as the car is trying to drive against the brake and slipping to stop the engine stalling.. Pressing on the footbrake disengages the clutches and leaves the car ready to move off as soon as pressure on the brake is released.
Better when stationary and on reasonably level ground is to select P which locks up the transmission, and then the foot can come off the brake. To move away, apply footbrake again, move lever to D and release footbrake to move off.
If stopped at traffic lights or a jam, would it not be more sensible to use N, to avoid wrecking your gearbox if you get rear ended.
 

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That's why I personally keep my foot on the foot brake all the time. Clutch is disengaged so gearbox protected. Car will not move as far if hit as all the brakes are engaged, not just the parking brake.
Anyway it seems a bit ott to worry about things like that? If the car is hit at the rear and gearbox damaged, it is just a higher bill either for insurance company or better still the car that hit you.
I have been driving for 46 years and well over 500k miles and have only been hit once in the rear, and that was when I had to brake suddenly and hadn’t even stopped at the time of the impact!
 

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On my second Yeti 17 plate and DSG has just failed at 11500 miles. First 12 plate failed at 34000 and again at 40000. Warranty repairs must be costing Skoda UK a fortune. ‘No Sir, it’s not a systemic problem...’
 

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On my second Yeti 17 plate and DSG has just failed at 11500 miles. First 12 plate failed at 34000 and again at 40000. Warranty repairs must be costing Skoda UK a fortune. ‘No Sir, it’s not a systemic problem...’
What were the failures?
 

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The 12 plate had complete DSG gearboxes replaced (made to order in Czech Republic so took ages). Traded it with help from Skoda UK for the 17 plate with 3000 miles - I've only done about 8500 miles and began to hear the ominous rattly whistle when reversing a few weeks ago (this noise preceded the previous 2 failures). Asked the dealer to investigate at last service - they gave it back to me broken. Since they are incompetent idiots, the car is now at another dealer with a master mechanic - don't know yet, could be the clutch pack, the box or the mechatronic. I love the practicality of the Yeti but can't continue with such unreliability.
 

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Asked the dealer to investigate at last service - they gave it back to me broken. Since they are incompetent idiots
Don't tell us, the dealer was Marshalls?
 

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The 12 plate had complete DSG gearboxes replaced (made to order in Czech Republic so took ages). Traded it with help from Skoda UK for the 17 plate with 3000 miles - I've only done about 8500 miles and began to hear the ominous rattly whistle when reversing a few weeks ago (this noise preceded the previous 2 failures). Asked the dealer to investigate at last service - they gave it back to me broken. Since they are incompetent idiots, the car is now at another dealer with a master mechanic - don't know yet, could be the clutch pack, the box or the mechatronic. I love the practicality of the Yeti but can't continue with such unreliability.
Both the DSG and manual gearboxes, like 80% of all the other Yeti components apart from outer body panels and interiors, are made by VW, not Skoda. And used around the entire VW, Audi, Seat and Porsche ranges. Not just by Skoda. The Skoda factory in Mlada Boleslav primarily now builds bodyshells and assembles cars using mechanical components and electronics trucked in from VW. The bit about “made to order in Czech Republic” therefore sounds like a line of bull excrement made up by someone at a dealership to blow smoke up your rear.

Moving on...
Still no proper answers to Bryetian’s question or any of the other questions in the parallel thread about “Systemic failures in DSG”. Just repeats of the “failure” chronology. Therefore very difficult to reach anything more than a “not enough evidence” conclusion.
Quite prepared to accept that the word “failure” is all the detail you’ve been given by a dealer. But if that is the case, please say so. Then we know who not to hound.

We’re all three Yetis the same engine and gearbox/clutch type? As people have explained in the parallel thread, there are important differences, depending on engine to which the DSG was attached. Without that information, it is very difficult to progress.

As you will gather from responses in the other thread, there are plenty of owners and YOC members who have been running DSG boxes for far greater mileages, in a variety of cars, both VW and Ford, without any such problem. So a little more background on how your cars are habitually being used, and if you have experience with either torque converter type auto boxes, or DSG boxes in other marques from the VW empire, would be useful. To get a better handle on whether the problems you have experienced are down to the DSG engineering, or the way the cars are being used?
 
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I love the practicality of the Yeti but can't continue with such unreliability.
Why not swap to a manual box Yeti then? If DSGs clearly don’t get on with you? Our manual 5-speed Yeti has now covered over 223,000 miles with no problems with the gearbox, and still on only its second Dual Mass Flywheel. The DMF being regarded as a wear and tear, consumable item, like a clutch.
 

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I'd rather not say until case is settled...!
 

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I would if I could find one. The 17 plate DSG Yeti had only 3000 miles and was a bargain price, being off set by embarrassed Skoda UK.
 

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Both Yetis were 1.2TSi with DSG. Have all the papers from first replacement, almost £6000. Second failure triggered the trade-in as repair would exceed the value of car. Was told today that the 17 plate failure is the flywheel. I am retired and have always driven gently and sympathetically. My suspicion is that the so-called mechanics and car washers are not so gentle (witness wheelspin starts and squeaky stops). I do all the maintenance on my orher 3 vehicles and, unlike the Yeti, all are totally reliable.
 

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Both 1.2TSi DSG. First one, when I was still working, did 5-6,000 miles pa, commuting 5 miles each way and longish motorway runs 2-3 times a month. The facelift is used locally (am now retired) about 3,000 miles pa mainly A roads. Gentle driving, no towing, a pampered but ungrateful companion...
 

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My Yeti needed a clutch pack replacing. I had it done at around 14k miles but, looking back, the signs were there from when I bought it second hand with only 6k miles on the clock.

Mine is a 1.2 DSG 16 plate, but isn't a dry clutch - it needs oil changes and has the usual oil filler cap and dipstick.
 

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The oil filler cap and dipstick are to do with the ENGINE oil.... nothing too do with the clutch (or gearbox). The engine oil does not, and MUST not, go into the clutch. A 1.2 petrol DSG Yeti will definitely have dry clutches.
 
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