Yeti Owners Club banner

21 - 26 of 26 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
My Yeti needed a clutch pack replacing. I had it done at around 14k miles but, looking back, the signs were there from when I bought it second hand with only 6k miles on the clock.

Mine is a 1.2 DSG 16 plate, but definitely isn't a dry clutch - it needs oil changes and has the usual oil filler cap and dipstick.
Sorry but all the petrol cars have a dsg dry clutch pack. The gearbox has fill and drain plugs but no normal oil replacement is specified. As the clutch is not runnig in the oil it doesn't get contaminated as do the wet clutch ones like in my diesel car.
The wet clutches are inherrently reliable and can do huge mileages. Should outlast the rest of the car.As the power is taken up the clutch plates move towards each other, but it is shear in the oil between the plates which transmits the power between the plates moving at different speeds. The plates don't touch until both are running at the same speed, so virtually no wear occurs.
In the dry clutch petrol cars, which you have, drive is transmitted as it would be in a manual clutch by them coming together and one rubbing against the other until both going at the same speed and locked together. This wears out the clutch pack just like on a manual car. It has a life expectancy and will have to be replaced at some point.
The dry clutch pack will be worn out by incorrect use very quickly. EG handbrake on at a junction with the gearbox in S, D, or reverse, and brake released. (I have seen Skodas own delivery drivers doing this when beign given a lift to work whilst my car is serviced!!) I also think the coasting function in the mfd should be turned off. I don't like having no engine braking if I take my foot off the accelerator, and that adds thousands of clutch operations which can be avoided, as it immediately re-engages drive if the brake or accelerator is touched
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Sorry but all the petrol cars have a dsg dry clutch pack. The gearbox has fill and drain plugs but no normal oil replacement is specified. As the clutch is not runnig in the oil it doesn't get contaminated as do the wet clutch ones like in my diesel car.
The wet clutches are inherrently reliable and can do huge mileages. Should outlast the rest of the car.As the power is taken up the clutch plates move towards each other, but it is shear in the oil between the plates which transmits the power between the plates moving at different speeds. The plates don't touch until both are running at the same speed, so virtually no wear occurs.
In the dry clutch petrol cars, which you have, drive is transmitted as it would be in a manual clutch by them coming together and one rubbing against the other until both going at the same speed and locked together. This wears out the clutch pack just like on a manual car. It has a life expectancy and will have to be replaced at some point.
The dry clutch pack will be worn out by incorrect use very quickly. EG handbrake on at a junction with the gearbox in S, D, or reverse, and brake released. (I have seen Skodas own delivery drivers doing this when beign given a lift to work whilst my car is serviced!!) I also think the coasting function in the mfd should be turned off. I don't like having no engine braking if I take my foot off the accelerator, and that adds thousands of clutch operations which can be avoided, as it immediately re-engages drive if the brake or accelerator is touched
Aha, thank you and to the previous reply for explaining this difference. Tempting to remove my mistake but perhaps others have the same misconception. I've got a lot still to learn, but luckily I never do any work on the car myself beyond basic top-ups!

Why are dry clutches used if wet are superior? Are they cheaper and generally sufficient for lower powered petrol engines?

It's possible that the previous owner for my car drove it incorrectly. It's either that or a random mechanical failure for it to have worn out so quickly. Skoda covered the full cost of parts and part of labour, so must have acknowledged some blame.

This is the first automatic of any kind that I've owned - so not bad auto habits here like leaving it in drive and putting the handbrake on. Surely that must feel wrong as soon as you do it? I've seen some people claim that crawling along with the brake on is also bad for the clutch. Is this true? In slow traffic the 'creep' speed is too fast, and constant low braking is the only way to regulate speed. Perhaps fully stopping and starting is better, but difficult in practice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
research and my experience indicates that heat build up is the main problem with the dsg - I suspect that the vw dsg has more mass than the ford dsg and so a better heat sink - rumour has it that a seven dollar fan would have fixed the ford dsg problem instead of which ford put the blame on 'driving style' which lets face it is partly true - anyway anything that promotes heat in the dsg (like slipping the clutch) is to be avoided (and don't go out on a hot day :) - I'm kidding but I notice hot parts of the world like australia had a particular problem with dsg).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
research and my experience indicates that heat build up is the main problem with the dsg - I suspect that the vw dsg has more mass than the ford dsg and so a better heat sink - rumour has it that a seven dollar fan would have fixed the ford dsg problem instead of which ford put the blame on 'driving style' which lets face it is partly true - anyway anything that promotes heat in the dsg (like slipping the clutch) is to be avoided (and don't go out on a hot day :) - I'm kidding but I notice hot parts of the world like australia had a particular problem with dsg).
That might also explain why there were lots of problems in the US, where there are plenty of hot places. The blame is usually laid on the driving style of these countries which are used to traditional automatics, and that's likely to be a factor, but perhaps isn't the whole story.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
Wet clutches can handle a lot more power so are essential for the higher power cars. However it comes at the cost of a lot of drag from the clutch spinning in the oil. Hence petrol car with dry clutch dsg is actually more economical to drive than a manual car as more likely to be in the correct gear.
Wet clutch saps about 5% of mpg and a little bit of power compared to manual car, and has to have an expensive service every 40k.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
Creeping in traffic is something I try and avoid. Better to start and run at tick over, then stop and start again than go slower than tick over would permit with the brake applied. Worse on the dry clutch car again as the plates are slipping and wearing to do this. In the wet clutch dsg again less wear as it is fluid shear doing the slipping.
 
21 - 26 of 26 Posts
Top