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Good evening, I don't have a yeti,yet. I'm returning to live in the uk, yorkshire, but I do drive a skoda fabia 1.0 tsi colour edition dsg, which will be going back to skoda to sell for me. I intend to buy a yeti just as soon as my quarantine time is up. I love the dsg box.but my wife has trouble with the computer increasing the engine revs and it's put her off, big time. My wife wants to drive, and says she will, with a manual, but I would rather have the auto.so the question is does the 1.2tsi have same computer control as my fabia, which is 2019 model.
I've been reading the club sight for a few days now, very interesting.
Well back the packing ,
Tom
 

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What part of God’s Own County Tom?

If anywhere near Harrogate, would be well worth checking Brookroyd Garage, in the village of Killinghall, just to the north of the town. They are a small (2-man), independent who specialise in used Skodas. Very knowledgeable.

A warning though. Yetis seldom remain on any used car forecourt for more than a few days. When you do find the right one for you, be prepared to move in quickly, or it will be gone while you blink.

Best way to determine if the DSG control software on a 1.2 Yeti is to your wife’s liking, might be to test drive one?
 

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Welcome Tom :)

Not sure I quite grasp the issue your wife has with the DSG in the Fabia, when does she feel the engine revs increase out of her control? Not something I have ever felt with the yeti DSG but there were some who felt there was a lag in revs on entering roundabouts on occasions but that was not enough revs.
 

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Good morning flintstone, I'll be moving to Leeds, once the flights resume, Harrogate isn't far off, I have noticed that yetis are a popular buy, but I'd thought, wrongly, that car sales would have slowed but it seems lots of people want independent transport, staying away from public options. Thanks for heads up
 

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The engine computer increases the revs by 500+. Normally at 1000 but management can push them up, I have been to garage who cannot do anything about it as its part of the set up. It did feel wierd when I first got the car, but doesn't bother me but seem to always catch the wife at inappropriate times. Hence the question, maybe it's only on the 1.0tsi
 

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I haven't seen anyone report anything like that on a DSG Yeti.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
That sounds interesting, but as flintstone suggests, get her to drive one is going to convince her one way or another.
Thanks everyone for your interest and when I'm back in UK with my first yeti I'll put a few photos on. Oh in passing I looked up Brookroyd garage, they have a few on forecourt, and I'll be paying them a visit. But no flights until 15 April:cry::cry:
 

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The engine computer increases the revs by 500+. Normally at 1000 but management can push them up... ...Hence the question, maybe it's only on the 1.0tsi
Hi Tom and welcome to the Forum. It could be something specific to the 1.0tsi as I've not experienced anything like that on either my 1.2tsi DSG Roomster or my 1.2tsi DSG Yeti.
 

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get her to drive one is going to convince her one way or another.
If she does drive one, she will want it, and the only time you will get to drive it is when it needs the tank filled :)
 

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The 1.0 3 cylinders do tend to increase revs when creeping to avoid vibrations and stalling.

On a 1.2 4 cylinder revs will increase from tickover to 1000rpm when creeping on no throttle but will not go above that without pressing the accelerator.
 
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Good morning flintstone, I'll be moving to Leeds, once the flights resume, Harrogate isn't far off, I have noticed that yetis are a popular buy, but I'd thought, wrongly, that car sales would have slowed but it seems lots of people want independent transport, staying away from public options. Thanks for heads up
Correct!
Covid has pushed up used car prices considerably for a number of reasons. Chiefly:
  • Reduced new car sales. 2020 new car sales were at 60% of 2019 level. That in turn means there were 40% fewer trade-ins entering the top end of the UK market. Yet the majority of people still need a car to get to work (only those who CAN work from home do so). That reduced number of trade-ins has knock on effects right down the used car food chain.
  • Dangers of travelling by public transport. People who have a job that requires them to physically be in a place of work (meaning a majority of the working age population plus their children who are in school), would prefer to travel to work/school in a Covid-secure capsule (a.k.a. A Car). Rather risk catching a virus from others while cramped into a public transport vehicle. Hence demand for used cars has increased at the same time the supply has decreased.
  • Together that has dramatically increased the price of used cars, right across the ranges. Yetis especially, because of their excellent reputation as an immensely versatile used car buy. There’s never been a better time to be a used car dealer - apart from the problem they can’t get hold of enough stock to sell.

Then there’s climate change adding to the picture.
  • People who want to keep their carbon footprint as low as possible are holding onto and running their older cars for longer. Rather than cause a new car to be built and so by dramatically increase their CO2 output. E.G. to quote just two examples: a Mercedes C-Class produces around 7-8 tonnes of CO2, before it reaches the showroom. A Volvo XC40 produces 14 tonnes. Whereas running a conventional internal combustion car produces 1-3 tonnes per year, depending on mileage covered, model and fuel type. So it makes sense to hang onto an older, low CO2 diesel for as long as possible.
  • For the same reason carbon conscious buyers are avoiding switching to EV’s. A Tesla model 3 produces 12–15 tonnes of CO2 before it turns a wheel. Largely because of the global CO2 emissions involved in mining and manufacturing the batteries. Larger Tesla models with larger batteries produce considerably more CO2. A Polestar 2 EV (made by Volvo using batteries made in China), roughly the same size an XC40, emits 24 tonnes of CO2 before it gets to the showroom.
  • For these reasons, savvy buyers are avoiding EVs till their severe impact on climate change can be reduced by making their batteries with less environmental impact and a lower CO2 output. Or Hydrogen cars become cheaper. Using H2 created from wind farm electricity at times of low grid power demand. That in turn is driving up demand for low CO2, internal combustion used cars. Particularly from drivers who plan to do less mileage. So the CO2 emissions from using their cars are at the low end of that range of 1-3 tonnes annual CO2 output anyway.
  • Sources of figures: University of Munich and Volvo Cars UK.
 

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Correct!
Covid has pushed up used car prices considerably for a number of reasons. Chiefly:
  • Reduced new car sales. 2020 new car sales were at 60% of 2019 level. That in turn means there were 40% fewer trade-ins entering the top end of the UK market. Yet the majority of people still need a car to get to work (only those who CAN work from home do so). That reduced number of trade-ins has knock on effects right down the used car food chain.
  • Dangers of travelling by public transport. People who have a job that requires them to physically be in a place of work (meaning a majority of the working age population plus their children who are in school), would prefer to travel to work/school in a Covid-secure capsule (a.k.a. A Car). Rather risk catching a virus from others while cramped into a public transport vehicle. Hence demand for used cars has increased at the same time the supply has decreased.
  • Together that has dramatically increased the price of used cars, right across the ranges. Yetis especially, because of their excellent reputation as an immensely versatile used car buy. There’s never been a better time to be a used car dealer - apart from the problem they can’t get hold of enough stock to sell.

Then there’s climate change adding to the picture.
  • People who want to keep their carbon footprint as low as possible are holding onto and running their older cars for longer. Rather than cause a new car to be built and so by dramatically increase their CO2 output. E.G. to quote just two examples: a Mercedes C-Class produces around 7-8 tonnes of CO2, before it reaches the showroom. A Volvo XC40 produces 14 tonnes. Whereas running a conventional internal combustion car produces 1-3 tonnes per year, depending on mileage covered, model and fuel type. So it makes sense to hang onto an older, low CO2 diesel for as long as possible.
  • For the same reason carbon conscious buyers are avoiding switching to EV’s. A Tesla model 3 produces 12–15 tonnes of CO2 before it turns a wheel. Largely because of the global CO2 emissions involved in mining and manufacturing the batteries. Larger Tesla models with larger batteries produce considerably more CO2. A Polestar 2 EV (made by Volvo using batteries made in China), roughly the same size an XC40, emits 24 tonnes of CO2 before it gets to the showroom.
  • For these reasons, savvy buyers are avoiding EVs till their severe impact on climate change can be reduced by making their batteries with less environmental impact. Or Hydrogen cars become cheaper. Using H2 created from wind farm power at times of low electricity demand. That in turn is driving up demand for low CO2, internal combustion used cars. Particularly from drivers who plan to do less mileage. So the CO2 emissions from using their cars are at the low end of that range of 1-3 tonnes annual CO2 output anyway.
  • Sources of figures: University of Munich and Volvo Cars UK.
Middle of last year I paid £16k for the latest lowest mileage 4x4 L&K. (2017, 18k miles) Some 7 months later my local dealer has 2017 cars with double the mileage in for £17k
 

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Middle of last year I paid £16k for the latest lowest mileage 4x4 L&K. (2017, 18k miles) Some 7 months later my local dealer has 2017 cars with double the mileage in for £17k
Indeed. What makes that comparison even more stark, is that by mid 2020 used prices were already quite inflated compared to 12-months earlier.
 

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I paid 10K for my 66 plate L&K in December 2019, with 84K on the clock it was high mileage but it was barely 3 years old and that was from a dealer.
 

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I paid 10K for my 66 plate L&K in December 2019, with 84K on the clock it was high mileage but it was barely 3 years old and that was from a dealer.
That supports the observations in #11 and #13. Dec19 was before Covid had begun to impact used car prices.

84k is only “high mileage” in car dealer lingo though. (And we all know how deliberately misleading that can be :rolleyes:). More like “barely run in”, in my world :)

Or in the real world, highly likely to mean the car as a whole is more healthy than one advertised as “low mileage”. Especially for a diesel. As to achieve that mileage in a relatively short space of time, a high proportion of the journeys must have been on relaxed longer trips and/or motorways. Rather than hammered around an urban environment, constantly up and down the gearbox, over speed bumps and potholes, etc. for every trip. Perhaps seldom getting up to full operational temperature for many of its trips? Or spending long periods not being used at all? Not sure which is worse?

I bought our Yeti at 3 years old on 78,000 using that logic. Which has proved sound. After walking away from two others of similar age but far lower mileages, as “not enough miles to be healthy”.
 
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That supports the observations in #11 and #13. Dec19 was before Covid had begun to impact used car prices.

84k is only “high mileage” in car dealer lingo though. (And we all know how deliberately misleading that can be :rolleyes:). More like “barely run in”, in my world :)

Or in the real world, highly likely to mean the car as a whole is more healthy than one advertised as “low mileage”. Especially for a diesel. As to achieve that mileage in a relatively short space of time, a high proportion of the journeys must have been on relaxed longer trips and/or motorways. Rather than hammered around an urban environment, constantly up and down the gearbox, over speed bumps and potholes, etc. for every trip. Perhaps seldom getting up to full operational temperature for many of its trips? Or spending long periods not being used at all? Not sure which is worse?

I bought our Yeti at 3 years old on 78,000 using that logic. Which has proved sound. After walking away from two others of similar age but far lower mileages, as “not enough miles to be healthy”.
The mileage didn't bother me at all, it had been privately owned (one owner) and had been on a personal plate, so probably better looked after than a lease car.
It had been a main dealer trade in with too higher miles to go on their forecourt so sold to a small dealer.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Had to take my fabia into main dealers yesterday, for time service, thanks to covid and not allowed to leave my municipality I've only done 9782 kms. in 2 years, most of that was done in first year no one was in the car showroom, and when I was talking to service reception he said same as you guys , no one is buying new cars, but plenty of cars arriving for service. But the used car section is on reduced hours, probably for the same reason, cars are kept for ever in Spain and always fetch high price on selling. They have a more relaxed approach to owning a vehicle, and most have body modifications of one sort of another, drives me daft in supermarket car parks, but I'm not going down that road today. Got to think positive, soon be back in yorkshire.
 
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