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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all.

I pick up my first ever Skoda Yeti next Friday (A 2017 2.0 diesel 2WD) with 17,000 miles on the clock. After owing Vauxhall's all my driving life I'm really looking forward to driving it around the Isle of Man where I recently relocated to.

Richard.
 

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Welcome to the forum Richard :)

Any questions before or after you pick it up just ask.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks will do. Will get some pictures up when I pick it up.
 

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Isle of Man is one of my favourite places of all time. Tholt-y-Will, Druidale, Injebreck, Baldwins East and West, Round Table, Glen Rushen, St John, Eairy, Castletown, Port Erin, Cregneash, Back of the Moon, Foxdale, Maughold, Creg-ny-Ba. All names that Llanigraham will probably recall as stage names for either the Manx National or International rallies.

You have chosen a rather wonderful place to live Rich71. Welcome also to Yetiland.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
And we are 65 days covid free. Feel safe here!
 

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Hi Welcome to the forum, I hope you cover enough miles to keep a diesel healthy they need their legs stretched regularly.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Thats what I was thinking. Got a good run to work and back and always got the TT course to drive around (no speed limit).
Only 2 Yetis for sale on the island both diesel.
 

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I do like diesel, better sound and can be run off used chip pan oil in emergencies.

Did a bit of Island hopping a few years ago but was only the ones off Scotland's West coast and used to go to Bute regularly but Isle of Man has intrigued. Always somehow seemed sunnier. Stay safe.
 

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Got a good run to work and back and always got the TT course to drive around (no speed limit).
Has the 40mph speed limit been lifted?
 

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Plenty of good exercising roads on Mona’s Isle. I have fond memories of exercising various rally cars over the Round Table road among others. Rev limiter in 6th gear for at least 3 miles before turning left at the cross roads for a sphincter clenching run down hill towards Ronague.
 
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"I do like diesel, better sound and can be run off used chip pan oil in emergencies"
I wouldn't run a yeti on veg oil, the common rail DPF engine really isn't suited to veg, short or long term.

No I'm not one of those guys that'll tell you veg oil / biodiesel will kill your car, no, I ran veg / bio for many years, in fact I covered 100k on bio in a 406 2.1td.
You can run Common rail engines on biodiesel (and veg oil with some mods) but the DPF regen can be problematic as bio doesn't produce the same exhaust gas temp, that said bio doesn't produce the same amount of particulate either, so regens aren't as frequent.
You can remove the DPF and get it mapped out, but that's against the law, and could cause problems at MOT time.
 

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No I'm not one of those guys that'll tell you veg oil / biodiesel will kill your car, no, I ran veg / bio for many years, in fact I covered 100k on bio in a 406 2.1td.
You can run Common rail engines on biodiesel (and veg oil with some mods) but the DPF regen can be problematic as bio doesn't produce the same exhaust gas temp, that said bio doesn't produce the same amount of particulate either, so regens aren't as frequent.
You can remove the DPF and get it mapped out, but that's against the law, and could cause problems at MOT time.

Aye. I wouldn't want to do it if normal fuel was available but if you're somewhere and you somehow remembered the chip pan but not the extra fuel can it could give you some hours. I've heard it also causes a larger buildup of carbon in the injectors and fuel pump. how did your 406 stand up with the higher viscosity? That's the main thing thought would hinder it.

Never really looked into seriously trying it cause it always struck me as a parlour trick.
 

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Prior to buying the Yeti I was going to try producing my own diesel, bought a book on the subject and even found somewhere that ran courses on producing diesel from cooking oil. At the time the two downsides were the problems finding a supply of used oil and the additional chemicals needed to be added to the cooking oil. All the emissions measures fitted to the Yeti was the final straw in cancelling that idea. 2000 litres per year of tax free diesel was quite appealing.
 

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Ran a Rover 75 on biodiesel produced with a garage owning friend. Used a Bioegg with oil disposed of for 2 local takeaways, for free ( they considered that a bargain), which kept my Rover, his Shogun, and his wife's Clio running for 2 years.
All the pipes in the Rover and Shogun had to be changed to cope but the Clio was fine in completely standard spec.
This was prior to any form of DPF or emissions gubbins ( technical term there ) being fitted to most diesels, and last I heard he was still running his breakdown truck on biodiesel in New Zealand, though we lost touch about 10 years ago.
I had a permanent chip craving though.
 

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The buses in Reading ran on biodiesel for a while, but not now as the savings were not sufficient. However for a short time I was quite happy to be stuck behind a bus, :)
 

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Aye. I wouldn't want to do it if normal fuel was available but if you're somewhere and you somehow remembered the chip pan but not the extra fuel can it could give you some hours. I've heard it also causes a larger buildup of carbon in the injectors and fuel pump. how did your 406 stand up with the higher viscosity? That's the main thing thought would hinder it.

Never really looked into seriously trying it cause it always struck me as a parlour trick.
Yes it can cause carbon buildup in the injectors, but not the fuel pump, that gets a varnish type of coating inside.
The 406 stood up well, but I did change the Lucas EPIC injection pump for a manual Bosch unit from the 1.9 engine, that pump lasted around 70K before the varnish blocked it up inside and was swapped for another.
But that was running biodiesel not veg.
My veg runners were a 405 1.9TD, Xantia 1.9TD and later a Disco 300TDI.
Bio runners were the 406 2.1TD, 406 2.0 HDI, Merc C250TD, Ford Galaxy 1.9TDI, Disco 300TDI (same disco), Audi A4 1.9TDI, 306 2.0 HDI, 106 1.5 TD, 306 1.9TD.
Not all the cars were mine, some were my wife and daughter's cars.
10 years of 10 to 15 pence a litre (all my oil was free).
 

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I guess that paid for quite a few injection pumps? Just out of interest, how much were those?

Were either of the Peugeot HDi motors common rail too? Common rail designs run at much higher injection pressures than more traditional diesels like VW’s PD series. Received wisdom is that CR engines are much more vulnerable to things like injectors and regulator valves gumming up with varnish when running either veg or bio oil fuel. Hence why the Yeti’s (ours at least) has a prominent “No Bio” symbol inside the fuel filler cap.
 
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Surely a diesel Yeti on the isle of man is never going to do the regular long trips required, or even reach the speeds needed to keep the DPF etc healthy?

I understood that VW and presumably Skoda won't even sell you a new diesel car if you are on an island like this or the channel islands due to this issue?
 
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