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I learnt to tow at work, where you were "asked" to move something with any van or small wagon or anything on site or in the yard.
You soon learnt or be laughed at or taken the **** by anyone watching and word passed round.
The worse thing i found to reverse were compressors, as you could not see them until too late.
 

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Thinking back about work, as apprentices you would not be able to drive a van (even after passing test) unless the mechanical supervisor had been out with you on road and okeyed you!:LOL::LOL:
 

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Yeti 2017 2.0TDi 4x4 L&K DSG
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I learnt to tow at work, where you were "asked" to move something with any van or small wagon or anything on site or in the yard.
You soon learnt or be laughed at or taken the **** by anyone watching and word passed round.
The worse thing i found to reverse were compressors, as you could not see them until too late.
The smaller the trailer the worst it is to reverse.

Reverse a 26 foot caravan no problem. 4 foot box trailer, not a chance.
 

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The
The smaller the trailer the worst it is to reverse.

Reverse a 26 foot caravan no problem. 4 foot box trailer, not a chance.
the shorter the distance between tow ball and trailer axel the quicker they turn, the answer is small movements of the steering wheel.
The yetis short tear overhang makes this easier, but it’s still hard 😆
 

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Yeti S+ 2010 2.0TDi CR110 2WD Manual
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The the shorter the distance between tow ball and trailer axle the quicker they turn, the answer is small movements of the steering wheel. The yetis short tear overhang makes this easier, but it’s still hard 😆
Indeed! (y)
Some of the easiest trailers to reverse with precision are those often attached to articulated trucks, that have their axles located at the extreme rear of the trailer, USA-style. As compared to the more common European norm of 2/3 the way between king pin and rear. MUCH more difficult in terms of sheer size and bulk of course. But you soon get used to that. (Well, you do if you grew up reversing fully loaded hay trailers into barns from the seat of a Ferguson TE20 you do, anyway).

By comparison, some of the hardest to reverse are agricultural implements when folded for road transport, that have tiny road wheels that are located very close to the hitch point of the tractor.
 
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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
The other helper for reversing a trailer is the number of axles. My car transporter (now long gone) had twin axles and was relatively easy to reverse accurately.
It was a "wheels under" type with 10" tyres running at just over 100psi. On one trip, on a dual carriageway and while a motorcyclist was passing, one of the off side tyres went bang. I thought I'd run over an iron bar or something like it but the motorcyclist slowed and was pointing excitedly at the trailer.
Luckily there was a lay-by ahead. Despite pulling over as far as possible, working with fast passing traffic was 'unpleasant'. I soon removed the affected wheel, repositioned the Land Rover on the trailer and drove home with three wheels on my wagon trailer.

When I built my 8 x 4 box trailer I gave it a longer than usual draw bar, partly for stability etc and partly so that the jockey wheel and spare wheel allowed the side hinged rear door of the Discovery to open fully.
 
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Most of my towing experience has been with a trailer for a motor boat.
It was possibly the easiest of all trailers to reverse with a car ... wheels near the back as Flintstone said, and twin axle as Bryetian said.

The usual tow car was a Range Rover. We fitted an additional tow ball to the front bumper ... that really does make reversing a trailer easy, especially when parking a boat or caravan against a wall on the left side. Or port side if you prefer!
 

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I cut my teeth on 40tf twin axels and 33ft singles, the 33’s were much harder.
Later we got some 45ft tri-axels they were a dream to reverse.
I still shift mobile compressor, gritter and diesel bowser around with a forklift, the rear steer makes it easy.
 
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