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Thanks Urrell. "Clock spring" is a bit of a misnomer!
 

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Looks like less of a fight than when I changed the recoil spring on my motor mower.
Worse is when you have just dismantled it and just about to take note of where it all goes :eek::oops: and it all flies apart and then you are wondering where it all fitted.
 

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Done another thing similar with a boat steering helm, took it apart in nearly force 6 winds and pouring rain onlly then to come back a month later and wonder where it fitted.
 

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One wonders, if this is not Skoda related, whether it has been post in the wrong category?
It certainly seems of interest to some.
 

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Thanks Urrell - fascinating.
 
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Discussion Starter #10
One wonders, if this is not Skoda related, whether it has been post in the wrong category?
How is that not Skoda related or technical enough? it's behind the steering wheel in every single one.
Or can you not get your head around it.
 

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How is that not Skoda related or technical enough? it's behind the steering wheel in every single one.
Or can you not get your head around it.
Thank you Urrell. I watched the 14 minute video, and after about 8 minutes I dropped off.
Must have missed the bit about Skoda and Technical.
Will certainly bear it in mind the next time I take my steering off.
Thanks for the support you give to this forum.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Must have missed the bit about Skoda and Technical.
If inside the clockspring was not technical enough for you you must be a rocket scientist or something.
As for not being Skoda it's the same as a different brand of tyre, exactly the same makeup.
If that is boring I cannot help but I'm sure someone will be along soon to post something more interesting.


Will certainly bear it in mind the next time I take my steering off.
There are several here that have done just that because of a failed clockspring.
My mother always said if I have nothing to say "say nothing".
 

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My mother always said if I have nothing to say "say nothing".
Too true! It's a leaf I need to put in my book.
I was brought up on the premise that "it is better to be quiet and be thought a fool, than open your mouth and remove all possibility of doubt.
 
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Discussion Starter #14
Too true! It's a leaf I need to put in my book.
I was brought up on the premise that "it is better to be quiet and be thought a fool, than open your mouth and remove all possibility of doubt.
Ah I agree with that wholeheartedly, you are learning. (y)
 

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Just a thought but the term clock-spring came up on the forum a while ago and I had no idea what it was until Urrell posted the video. The complexity amazed me, particularly the circuit board and the ribbon cables, but then thinking of all the functions operated from the steering wheel, it’s now understandable.I see how the name originated, but it’s another term like B pillar or door card that is not self-explanatory.
 

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Those functions including the power steering itself Jimmy. Which on most modern cars is 100% electrically provided. With no hydraulic power to the steering rack at all.

All the "assistance" is provided by electrical or magnetic induction motors surrounding the steering column. That assistance can be programmed to vary the amount of push that is applied to supplement the driver, according to both steering angle and speed. Hence the need for precise steering angle position sensors that the video looks at. Also to know exactly where "straight ahead" is. So it knows how much electrical "push" to provide to the column to return the wheel to straight ahead without overshooting.

This was all "new learning" to me not too long ago. When we first got our Yeti, in 2013, I spent some time searching the engine compartment, looking for the power steering fluid reservoir, to check its level. Only to discover after consulting the selling garage that it had "electric power steering", not hydraulic. ;) :rolleyes::) I then went to research how that worked. Hence the over-simplified and possibly slightly inaccurate description above.

"Door cards" got the name, because in the 60's and 70's they were invariably made from flat pieces of pressed card, not unlike a slightly more flexible hardboard. That could be easily cut to a variety of different shapes, have holes cut in for things like latches or window winders, and be covered in vinyl, sometimes padded. Or if really extravagant, leather. Each card being fixed to the inner door frame by a few clips and the odd screw or three.

Unless you were driving a series 1 Mini, (with the sliding side windows). Where you didn't have inner door cards at all. Nor an inner door frame. Just a void in the door and a vinyl covering glued to the inside of the outer door skin. Or on luxury versions like the Riley Elf and Wolesley Hornet a card that was slotted in and curved to matchup close to the inside of the outer door skin. Plus a big bin shaped metal pressing welded to the inside base of the door to provide some strength. That was cleverly "sold" by Issigonis as somewhere to keep all your stuff. Making a virtue out of a necessity, and very useful they were too!

Today they are invariably made from several different grades of plastics. Hence I can imagine the bewilderment where the name "card" comes from.
 

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Do you remember (older members only perhaps) the "sex education" you got at school? I always felt that this was an attempt to stop too much fiddling about by showing how much could become disarranged by doing so. Never stopped me, but I wouldn't fiddle with a "clockspring".
Don't want to get saddled with lots if slippery greasy ribbon cables.
 

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Those functions including the power steering itself Jimmy. Which on most modern cars is 100% electrically provided. With no hydraulic power to the steering rack at all.
That means that my long ago friend who drove his mini with only a set of mole grips to steer it would be ... (supply your own epithet).
 

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Do you remember (older members only perhaps) the "sex education" you got at school? I always felt that this was an attempt to stop too much fiddling about by showing how much could become disarranged by doing so. Never stopped me, but I wouldn't fiddle with a "clockspring".
Don't want to get saddled with lots if slippery greasy ribbon cables.
I went to a naval college, where sex education was not taught.
If you needed some guidance in that area, then the the matron would be best, but some said she was a bag of bones!!
 
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