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Just done several searches for a thread that had photos of the access issues for changing the oil filter on a 2.0 but could not find it.After changing the 360mm cooling fan today I had a look at the oil filter housing. I like to change the oil in my cars at lower intervals than the manufacturers advice so change mine in between services.
I popped the top cover off and found that the filter is directly below the pipe marked in this photo.


I cannot see any way of getting to and then removing the filter housing with that pipe in situ.
Does that pipe require to be unbolted , can it be , and if so I guess new gaskets are required when it is to be refitted.
Dreadful design .........
Thanks .
 

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Hi Steely Dan.
Man after my own heart in wanting to change the oil more frequently than the supposed "recommended" intervals. Those are not designed with the longer term health of the motor in mind. Only the contract service costs over the first three years. But I've ranted enough about that in other threads.
 
I can see why you're perplexed from the photo of the filter installation in your car. I'll attempt to explain the sequence below. The only other comment I would make is that if you find the Yeti's oil filter is slightly difficult to reach, don't ever attempt a filter change on a Renault Scenic diesel - that really is 10 times worse and the air filter just as bad - I still have the scars to prove that!
 
1. The unpainted steel pipe you have arrowed in the photo, is the exhaust gas recirculation system transfer pipe. Bringing exhaust gasses out from the port through the cylinder head, on the right of your photo, and round to the inlet manifold, just above the Throttle Control Body. The lower part of the inlet plenum being the large, black plastic, ribbed component, running upwards across the upper left quadrant of your photo. With the Throttle Body just below it at mid left in photo. In theory, and in practice in my case, this pipe does NOT need to come off to remove the oil filter! Although the filter head is a tight, wiggle fit, past this pipe, you should find the filter does come out with this EGR pipe in situ.
 
2. Just as an aside, in case you are wondering, the EGR valve unit is on the back of the engine, below the turbo. The gasses from there are routed through the cylinder head for cooling, then emerge into this pipe on the front of the head. I've had this pipe off at least four times now. for internal cleaning when also removing the Throttle Body. And when I tried using a blanking plate between pipe and head to restrict the gas flow entering the inlet. (That only led to EGR warnings, so was removed again after three weeks experimental use). Point being if you DID find you needed to loosen this EGR pipe on your car, you can do that quite easily. Just loosen the clamp bolt on the left end. That's a bell-mouth fitting onto the inlet, with no gasket. That may be enough even. At the head end, it is held by two T20 torx bolts. For your purpose you would only need to loosen those. Not remove. There is a thin metal gasket between pipe flange and the head. Held onto the flange by a couple of tabs. But that is reusable. At least so far as I've found. It's stainless steel. So likely there only to prevent dissimilar metal corrosion between steel pipe and alloy head.
 
3. The one item that DOES, 100% definitely need to be unbolted, is that electrical gizmo / sensor thingy (I'm getting technical here!
) at upper centre in your photo. The circular gizmo with the grey plastic cap. That should have "MADE IN USA" printed on it, if it is like mine? Joined to that aluminium, complex shape bracket in upper centre of your shot. Just out of photo at top centre, that bracket is held onto the inlet manifold by a single short bolt. (Torx head orginally, now a hex bolt on mine after I lost the original during one winter oil change (Not into the oil filter housing fortunately!). Remove that one bolt and the whole bracket, along with the Made in USA gizmo, its electrical connector AND the most of the associated minor pipework, SHOULD fold over to the right, above the EGR pipe. You may find you need to tuck it under some of the other pipes to hold it out of the way, while you get the filter out. Once tucked out of the way, you then have MUCH better access to top of the filter housing.
 
4. On our car, that 1cm dia rubber hose running right to left above the metal EGR pipe appears to run slightly lower than in your photo. That may be the effect of the camera angle though? The rubber hose has enough free play to be able to angle the filter out past it OK. But if you did need to give yourself a little more wiggle room, temporarily removing the single screw/bolt that secures the metal part of the same pipe to the top of the inlet plenum, should give you enough extra movement to allow the filter out past the rubber hose more easily.

 
5. The oil filter plastic head unit itself, simply unscrews from the filter body, with the filter element/insert attached. I use a 32mm 1/2""� Drive socket on a 9""� extension to reach the filter head easily. There is a long plastic stem forming part of the filter head, that runs down through the centre of the filter and plugs into the base of the alloy filter housing. As mentioned, the filter element and head SHOULD wiggle out past the EGR pipe as one, with a bit of angle towards the right. Some newspaper / kitchen towel / workshop blue roll under the area first to catch the inevitable dribbles of oil is a Good Idea.

6. You should also find the new filter cartridge comes with two new rubber O-ring seals. A large diameter ring that fits onto the filter head above the threads. A second small diameter that fits near the tip of the stem and plugs into the base of the filter housing on replacement.  The small O-ring can be fiddly to fit to the stem. A small flat blade screwdriver helps, to angle the O-ring into its groove on the stem as it slides and stretches over the tip of the stem. Same applies to removing the old O-ring. N.B. Some filter cartridges (e.g. Bosch filters) also have a Top and bottom ends / are not symmetrical end to end.
 
Needless to say, but I will anyway. Do Not overtighten the filter head when replacing onto the body. 25Nm or 18 ft lbs is the figure. Which is barely more than hand tight.
 
Hope all that will be of some help?  Let us know how you get on.....
 
Fred.

Edited by: Flintstone
 

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Pretty good write-up by Fred which covers everything. Definitely no need to remove the stainless pipe. I have done 4 or 5 Filter changes on our 2012 Tdi 2.0 and you are correct that the design is at best poor. As Fred says removal and pulling to one side of the ""gizmo thingy""� is necessary and easy. Even after careful assembly of the Filter Element onto the Housing Cover Cap the subsequent ""insertion""� into the plastic body always seems like a hit and miss affair to me. Having said that I have never had a leak. Also, as Fred says be careful not to over tighten the Cap. The recommended torque is 25Nm which in my opinion is very tight. After my last dealer service I literally thought I was going to break the housing from the engine trying to loosen the cap, it was so tight. Lots of paper towel stuffed around the housing will avoid any oil running down the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Fred and Mike , thank you very much for the info and comprehensive advice. , great write up and one that should maybe in the "how to " section for posterity .I'll lift the engine cover and identify the sequence later .
Thanks again
Don
 

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Just popped out to check our Yeti again for that rubber hose that runs across the top of the EGR pipe an inlet plenum. That I wasn't able to do when writing the original description in post 2 of this thread. It IS present on our Yeti after all, just routed marginally lower! Strange how the brain blocks memory of stuff that hasn't been a problem at all? The filter comes out OK with this pipe in situ as well. It has enough give and movement to not be a problem at all. Which I guess is why I didn't remember it being there yesterday.

If it was a problem in your installaton, then perhaps just temporarily removing the screw that secures the metal part of the same pipe to the top of the inlet plenum would allow it enough extra movement?

I've modified my original post (no 2 in this thread) accordingly.

Correct torque Mike. ‘� Checked that too while I had my head under the bonnet. Thanks for adding that. According to the conversion App for my trusty Norbar torque wrench, 25Nm is just 18 Ft Lbs in old money. Barely more than hand tight. I only ever hand tighten the filter head, then just check the head is fitted snugly to the body. Can't get a fingernail in between head and body is my test. Never had a leak, yet. But I do invariably fit a new O-ring seal every time. Edited by: Flintstone
 

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Troll

Have read your piece on oil change i have the yeti 2015 (65 plate) and can only get to the oli filter from underneath the car is this right or am i missing something thanks TROLL
 

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Have read your piece on oil change i have the yeti 2015 (65 plate) and can only get to the oli filter from underneath the car is this right or am i missing something thanks TROLL
Not sure if engines change and what you have, but my 2014 2.0lt D is the same as the photo.

Just pull the cover off the top of the engine (4 lugs holding it) and the filter is there under that pipe
 

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Have read your piece on oil change i have the yeti 2015 (65 plate) and can only get to the oli filter from underneath the car is this right or am i missing something thanks TROLL

What engine do you have?
 

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Hi Troll.
I hope you’re not living up to your name?

What is perhaps not abundantly clear in the text of post #1 of this thread, but is clear enough from the accompanying photo, is that the entire discussion relates solely to the DIESEL engined Yeti. Primarily the 2-litre version, in all its power variations, 110, 140, 150 and 170ps. As fitted to the Yeti 2.0 diesel versions throughout its production life. The 1.6 litre diesel as found in the Yeti Greenline is part of the same engine family and 99% similar. In VW language this is the “EA189” engine family. The same engines as were implicated in the “dieselgate” VW emissions test cheating controversy a few years ago. (UK Litigation against VW in respect of its lies is still ongoing by the way).

I can assure you the ONLY access to the oil filter on an EA189 diesel is from above, after removing the sound deadening top cover.

Is your Yeti a petrol engined version by any chance? As Urrell mentioned. Does it have a spin on, canister type filter? Rather than a cartridge insert filter as found on the EA189. If so, then different ball game.
 

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Just carried out yet another Oil and Filter change on our 2.0 Tdi. Every time I do this (8 times now) I wince at the awful design.
I am never quite sure if everything has gone back together as it should. Screwing the assembled plastic top cover with the new filter attached into the plastic housing always feels and sounds awful. This time I even very lightly coated the plastic threads with grease and lubed the three "O" rings with clean engine oil. Still I'm never happy that I have got it right, but as I said in a previous post I have never had a leak.
 

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This type of filter head and body is VERY common on modern cars Mike. Especially German cars I find. What type are you used to from earlier cars?

Are you sure the filter housing / body is plastic? Definitely alloy on ours. Only the head / top cover assembly is black plastic. Not saying you are wrong. Just wondering if there really is a difference? What year is yours, and is it a Euro V or VI engine?
 

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Well then, you had me thinking there, so I have just been out and had a good look (after removing the engine top cover and swinging the electrical gizmo thing to one side for access). As far as I can see and feel mine definitely looks like black plastic. In fact I have also had a look on Ebay and every Filter Housing Assy. I can see does look like Black Plastic. The only part which is Alloy is the "finned" heat exchanger/cooler which is mounted on the front of the Black Plastic assy. The last car I had with this type of Filter Housing (Paper Element in a separate housing) was a 1962 Austin A60 Cambridge and that too was a right pain to change !!.
Haven't a clue just what Euro engine it is other than it's a 81kw CFHA. I have had the car from new. (June 2012)
Regards. Mike.
 

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The last car I had with this type of Filter Housing (Paper Element in a separate housing) was a 1962 Austin A60 Cambridge and that too was a right pain to change !!.
Haven't a clue just what Euro engine it is other than it's a 81kw CFHA. I have had the car from new. (June 2012)
Regards. Mike.
Ha ha! Changed many a filter on an A60. My Dad had a string of at least 4 of them in a row, 5 if you count the Pininfarina styled A55 Cambridge that preceded the A60. They made a great “farmer’s car”. Built like a brick sh1thouse, provided you ignored the rust. Boot lid that opened right down to the bumper. You could fit two standard hay bales in the boot, or two standard egg crates. But not all 4 at the same time. :smile: Whip the back seat out (easy enough) and you could also fit a sheep in the back for an ambulance trip to the vets. With a 10-year old (me) to hold the sheep quiet during the trip. I was the farm’s machine maintenance monkey right up to him retiring properly and finally packing up for a life in the village.

In fact all the B-series engined cars from BMC had the same filter body design. As did the A-series, just a smaller replica of the same thing. And many tractor engines of the era, their’s a bit bigger. A long bolt through the centre of the light alloy housing that surrounded the paper element and held both to the filter head. So as you unscrewed the bolt, you got a nice dribble of hot oil down your arm. The only other hassle I can recall was removing the old rectangular profile o-ring from the filter head, prior to fitting a new one. But with a strong nappy pin to spear the old o-ring and withdraw it, that became a doddle. People used to ask why I had a nappy pin through the lapel of my work overalls. That was so I always knew where to find it. :wink: Aligning the filter body with the o-ring slot as you bolted up the element and body was important. But not too difficult, just needed care.

Back to the Yeti. The black plastic, domed top cap, with the 32mm hex “nut” on the top, threads into the filter body, via a 20mm deep, threaded outer rim. The filter element withdraws upwards, with a wiggle past the EGR pipe, staying attached to the plastic head unit. In fact the element is a push fit onto a long plastic “stalk” that runs through its centre, and is permanently attached to the plastic filter head. The stalk is at least 40mm longer than the filter element. It’s tip slots into a hole in the base of the filter housing. To help ensure correct location when re-fitting the new filter. (If you’ve ever seen the the alignment structure that NASA developed in the 60’s to help dock the moon landers with the command module, to get the two perfectly lined up as they came together. It’s a lot like those, only a lot smaller. Once the filter element is out you’ll be better able to tell if the surrounding housing is alloy or plastic on your car.

There should be three o-rings in the new filter box. The smallest, only about 12mm diameter, goes on the end of the stalk, just above the tip. That one is a little tricky to fit, being so tiny. But small, flat blade screwdriver (e.g. as used for electrics) is a good help to ease it onto the stalk. The next is about 15-20mm diameter and fits onto the shank of the stalk just below the base of the filter element, when that is fitted. The last is approx 60mm across, the full width of the filter housing and fits onto the upper part of the filter head, between the top of the threads and the lip where the head locates onto the housing. I recommend removal and re-fitting all three o-rings after removing the old element, but refitting the new filter element. That avoids damaging the filter’s paper pleats while you fiddle with the o-rings.

Better quality filter elements, (such as Bosch, Mahle, Mann, perhaps?) are “ended”. Having a slightly wider diameter central hole at the top end, nearest the head, where the element fits over the shank, than at the lower end. This helps a snug fit and proper oil flow. The relevant end should say “Top” in faint lettering.

This more modern type of filter design is superior to the “spin on” canister filter idea with a metal, usually steel, outer body and central threaded screw on hole and locator. Those became popular on designs from the 70s to the turn of the Millennium. First seen on American designs. They were theoretically faster to swap. The big problems with those however were:
A) Very prone to over tightening or seizing themselves on while fitted. Which often made them pigs to remove in practice. Especially in engine bays with very little access room (like my old Renault Scenic).
B) Cost of manufacture and materials of the “throw away” whole thing. Filter element, casing and internal valving, etc. To be competitive on price, too often the hidden materials inside, the actual paper filter itself and more crucially the non-return valve (which prevented the filter draining all its oil back to the sump when the engine was off) were of such poor quality as to be almost useless and too prone to failure. Either that or were so expensive to buy, people didn’t. Hence the foolish idea it was worth changing the oil but not the filter.

The more modern designs have returned to the old idea of a housing that is a permanent part of the engine and a separate paper element or cartridge insert. This has several advantages.
1) You only buy the paper element itself each time. Not a lot of expensive metalwork wrapped around it. That you later throw away. Less waste in landfills too. The used paper element burns well in incinerators.
2) The non-return valving can be properly and more expensively engineered to be built into the housing and last the life of the engine. But you only buy it once. That makes the valving much more reliable and long lasting.
3) You can see the quality of the paper element you are buying. Cheapo manufacturers can’t get away with rubbish internals like with a canister filter.
4) The element is a LOT less expensive to manufacture. So maker’s can afford to use better quality filtration and still come out cheaper than a canister.
5) The consumer, you and I, only need pay for the parts we actually need to use.
Those newer designs are however somewhat updated compared to the 1960s. So a better quality, and in general easy to change. Apart from the VW EA189 installation where the EGR plumbing and other cables and connectors do get in the way of withdrawing the filter head.
 

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Isn’t it an amazingly nerdy thing to be discussing? The internals of automotive oil filters. :sad:
Other people even make You Tube videos about cutting open different makes of canister type oil filters to find out the quality of stuff inside them.:surprise:
The thing is, there’s money to be made with this level of obscure design detail. Judging by the number of companies sharing the market.:smile:
 

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It has always amazed me that when you look at anything manufactured every detail of it has been designed, every bit of text on it comes from a font, everything that bashes you knuckles is something that snuck past someones net of things not to have. How many of the little fiddly jobs were done by the design masters, how many by the novice on their first day on the job.

You could change the clutch on a Maxi very quickly, the power went right to the end and then came back into the engine, the clutch was the very last bit of the power train before it went back in. Change the oil filter? every dimension of every opening it could go through was about 5% too small.
 

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It was just as well you could change the clutch easily on a Maxi. The crankshaft oil seals were specced with inferior material for cheapness. So failed after 15,000 miles or so and leaked oil onto the clutch. So new clutch every second oil change interval. Trouble was, to fix the seal you had to remove the Flywheel too. :smile:
 

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It was just as well you could change the clutch easily on a Maxi. The crankshaft oil seals were specced with inferior material for cheapness. So failed after 15,000 miles or so and leaked oil onto the clutch. So new clutch every second oil change interval. Trouble was, to fix the seal you had to remove the Flywheel too. 😄
great write on Oil Filter replacement so thanks to Flintstone.
I couldn't find the filter so resorted to the good old Yeti Forum, now to go a try changing it.
thanks again.
Bob
 

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Thanks Bob and welcome. Glad you found the description helpful.

I also now know some of the (later?) 1600 diesels have the oil filter in a different location altogether. Pointing downwards and only accessible from below, with the undertray off. So the comment above about all EA189 diesels having the same filter location may no longer be true. Even if semi-accurate at the time it was written?

P.S. Don’t tell The Hood and Snowgood ;), but I do also have a set of photos now, to create an illustrated version of this write up, Haynes style. The photos along with others are currently stuck on my iPhone though. Can’t seem to get them to download from there or iCloud to my Windows 10 laptop at the mo. As I keep promising - “one of these days...”
 
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