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Now had my Yeti (1st reg June 2012) 140 Tdi for a couple of weeks. A few days ago I came home after driving just a few local miles and when I parked up, the radiator fan stayed on for longer than I've ever known it happen with any other car I've had this last 30+ years - as in 10-15 minutes I'd guess. I've only ever known this to happen with any other car I've had in hot weather and just run on for less than a minute. The car didn't seem or smell hot and water and oil temps were plumb normal.
One other thing - earlier the same day, the alarm seemed to go off for no reason too.
Any other similar ideas or suggestions folks??
TIA and regards to all,
Mike
 

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The fan on my Greenline has done this a couple of times, but as long as the engine management light stays off, don't worry about it
 

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I have a Yeti with the 2.0 140 engine and it does it regularly, as did my previous car which was a VW Passat with the same engine. Mine does it after a short journey and I think it's something to do with the D.P.F. completing the regeneration process.
 

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Thanks for the reports guys. My 2014 170 DSG does it too - very worrying the first time but as observed, no warning lights or temp rise. Did it again yesterday at 1 Deg C ambient and heater on full belt at the end of a 10 mile mixed urban/country drive. DPF cooking cycle sounds very plausible. Conclusion - they're still doing it! Ted
 

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It's definitely the DPF regenerating. There are lots of threads on here about it and if my memory serves me correctly, it's in the hand book. Nothing to worry about, just the car doing what it's designed to do.

Keith
 

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Happened to me the other day why the fan needs to be on to regenerate the DPF beats me ! I thought i had a problem until reading the forum, I thought the fan was to cool the engine coolant by sucking air through the radiator?.
Anyway I am on a really steep electronic gismo learning curve with this car, my own opinon is it has too much electronics in it and i hope it will not become a nightmare in the years ahead, someone posted that a speedo cluster is £1000 because of a blown LED to light the dash instruments!!! the LED can not be replaced like a spare bulb.
MY 1992 Skoda Favorite went on and on and on a great car really simple it never let me down, so only time will complete the story with the Yeti
 

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Found the info about the fan and the DPF on page 24 of the handbook There is a note above the section marked Fuel reserve which explains.The full info on the DPF starts on page 23 It is marked DPF ( diesel engine ) Must find the time to sit down and read the whole handbook
But must admit this YOC site is a great way of making you read the handbook. More electronics in this car than the 'Space Shuttle'
 

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Yep, I get this too, and this thread had answered my nagging concern. Thanks!
 

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EVOTRIANGLE said:
Found the info about the fan and the DPF on page 24 of the handbook There is a note above the section marked Fuel reserve which explains.The full info on the DPF starts on page 23 It is marked DPF ( diesel engine ) Must find the time to sit down and read the whole handbook
But must admit this YOC site is a great way of making you read the handbook. More electronics in this car than the 'Space Shuttle'
If you use the search facility between the FAQ and membership icons and enter Post No6 it will take you to the Skoda DPF leaflet, or you could find it via the Yetipedia in the Technical section.
 

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This from the thread on Turbo reliability may also give a second reason why the radiator fan would keep running for some time....
<table width="99%"><t><tr><td ="BBquote">
plbxr wrote:

Older style turbos failed because sudden shut downs would not allow the oil passing through the turbo to cool it down, hence they would "cook" the oil present in the oil galleries that fed the turbo bearings and especially around the bearings themselves. The turbos fitted to all Yetis are water cooled. The coolant is pumped by an electrical secondary coolant pump on the back of the engine. This pump will operate regardless of whether the ignition is off or on and is dependent on several factors including temps. If your engine is stopped and the turbo is at a high temp, then the pump will run and your turbo will be cooled to a sufficient level to avoid damage. This system is far superior to anything else including using a turbo timer or other similar procedures.
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plbxr! That could also explain why a few owners have expressed surprise at how long, on occasions, the main radiator cooling fans have continued running on their Yeti, after engine switch off. If the turbo is still being cooled and water circulated via that secondary, electrical pump, then the rad fan could have a very valid reason to continue running? The turbo being the hottest part of the engine, etc. Even after a relatively short run.
 

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I doubt if it is the turbo causing the radiator fan to run on, mine did it yesterday morning when I reached work for the third time in 43000 miles. I drive an identical route in an identical manner every day so if it were the turbo it would be far more often. I work an average of 21 days a month, so over three years that is over 750 round trips with just three incidents.

Edited by: The Hood
 
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