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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A few of you may remember that I had concerns about the amount of surface rust on the rear subframe and rear suspension arms.
So, as it has been dry for the last few days, I made a start on some sort of remedial action.

The only way to do this properly, of course, is to remove the subframe from the car.
I'm not going to do that as it is a load of work, and this is only surface corrosion ... the subframe is made of thick gauge steel so it will take a very long time to rot through, by which time I would say the rest of the car will be end of life anyway.

So, I set to with a couple of wire brushes. I won't bore you with my wire brush collection, but I know some of you like this sort of thing, so ... this one is extremely good for large areas that have reasonable access...
Black Automotive tire Font Jewellery Body jewelry


Here's a before and after shot of the centre of the subframe, where the lower control arms attach...
Automotive tire Car Automotive lighting Hood Motor vehicle


Tire Wheel Vehicle Car Automotive tire


And the area around the offside ARB mount...
Automotive tire Hood Motor vehicle Jaw Bumper


Wheel Tire Automotive tire Car Hood


I have not used a rust converter, or any primer or paint ... just Bilt Hamber Dynax UB applied directly to the wire-brushed surface.

I want to get this job complete before the roads start being salted.
I only had time to do what I could from underneath the car today. At the weekend I'll be removing the wheels and attacking whatever else this gives me access to.
 

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Full marks for effort but I fear you've actually achieved very little of real or lasting value.

So glad I live in a place where, in a typical car owners vocabulary, the word 'corrosion' doesn't exist and where salt is for putting on 馃 not the roads!

Innumerable 20+ year old cars on the road with narry a spot of rust in sight and ITV (=MOT) failures due to it are virtually unheard of.
 

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Full marks for effort but I fear you've actually achieved very little of real or lasting value.

So glad I live in a place where, in a typical car owners vocabulary, the word 'corrosion' doesn't exist and where salt is for putting on 馃 not the roads!

Innumerable 20+ year old cars on the road with narry a spot of rust in sight and ITV (=MOT) failures due to it are virtually unheard of.

Well good for you, but most of us do have to live in damp or even salt laden areas.
It also does make me wonder whether the Spanish ITV test is anywhere near as stringent as our MoT?

I do get under my cars at least every couple of years to keep up with any effect of corrosion and am more than grateful to Cubes, Flintstone and others who share their procedures.
 

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Test standards are set by EU directives so there should be little difference between a Spanish ITV and a UK MOT and in my experience, which includes some 10 years worth of French 'Control Technique' tests prior to moving to Spain almost 4 years ago, they are pretty comparable in their thoroughness. At a rough guess in that cumulative period I've probably put close to 30 cars through tests.

It's an undeniable fact that in UK, and if otherwise properly maintained, corrosion is the #1 MOT failure point and potential death warrant for cars so without that as an influencing factor it should come as no surprise if proportionally more (and on average older) cars in less damp and wintery countries pass their tests. That's not an indication of a lax system!

I'd also mention that in Spain ITV stations are very busy places with multiple lanes for processing cars on the go so the opportunities for having a 'pal' in the business to give you a moody pass with a nod and a wink do not exist.

One car I bought in UK to take to France was an MGB freshly imported from the US. Part of the deal was that the seller put it on UK plates which of course meant an MOT which somehow it passed with crummy US lap belts and front shock absorbers which were doing nothing whatsoever, TBH I doubt the car even went to an MOT station at all!

One definite advantage both in Spain and France is that testing stations are just that and not appendages to garages so the incentive to fail cars in the hope of securing work repairing them never enters the equation.
 

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One definite advantage both in Spain and France is that testing stations are just that and not appendages to garages so the incentive to fail cars in the hope of securing work repairing them never enters the equation.
That is also the case in Northern Ireland.

And, of course, in other parts of the UK one does have the option to take cars to dedicated testing stations (many local councils run them) rather than to garages. The difficulty arises if the vehicle Fails, and you then have to retrieve it (without driving it) to effect repairs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Full marks for effort but I fear you've actually achieved very little of real or lasting value.

So glad I live in a place where, in a typical car owners vocabulary, the word 'corrosion' doesn't exist and where salt is for putting on 馃 not the roads!

Innumerable 20+ year old cars on the road with narry a spot of rust in sight and ITV (=MOT) failures due to it are virtually unheard of.
K_Off
 

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Test standards are set by EU directives so there should be little difference between a Spanish ITV and a UK MOT and in my experience, which includes some 10 years worth of French 'Control Technique' tests prior to moving to Spain almost 4 years ago, they are pretty comparable in their thoroughness. At a rough guess in that cumulative period I've probably put close to 30 cars through tests.

It's an undeniable fact that in UK, and if otherwise properly maintained, corrosion is the #1 MOT failure point and potential death warrant for cars so without that as an influencing factor it should come as no surprise if proportionally more (and on average older) cars in less damp and wintery countries pass their tests. That's not an indication of a lax system!

I'd also mention that in Spain ITV stations are very busy places with multiple lanes for processing cars on the go so the opportunities for having a 'pal' in the business to give you a moody pass with a nod and a wink do not exist.

One car I bought in UK to take to France was an MGB freshly imported from the US. Part of the deal was that the seller put it on UK plates which of course meant an MOT which somehow it passed with crummy US lap belts and front shock absorbers which were doing nothing whatsoever, TBH I doubt the car even went to an MOT station at all!

One definite advantage both in Spain and France is that testing stations are just that and not appendages to garages so the incentive to fail cars in the hope of securing work repairing them never enters the equation.
You miss my point. I really am not interested in the vagaries of the Spanish ITV system but I do feel that you have done Cubes a huge dis-service. As one of quite a few on here who keep our cars for long periods, I find Cubes鈥 informed advice far more relevant than yours.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I've now done as much as I'm going to do on this.
There has been a build-up of mud on the rear running gear since we got the car, so today's activity was just as much about removing this as it was the rear subframe

Nearside rear, before and after
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Tire Automotive tire Vehicle Tread Bumper


Lots of crud removed. This is a larger than average dustpan, and this was the nearside only...
Road surface Grass Gas Composite material Concrete


Offside wasn't so bad, but does have the fuel filler pipes to provide a nice dirt trap...
Automotive tire Tire Tread Wood Grey


All done...
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If anyone regularly off-roads or goes down muddy lanes, I recommend removing the rear wheelarch liners and having a peek behind them.

Whilst I'm sure they provide protection, they are not designed to be a perfect seal, and there's plenty of gaps where debris can get behind them. And then it can't get out, of course.

The factory bodyshell protection has done a pretty good job of resisting corrosion, but there were a couple of spots where surface corrosion was just starting on the bodyshell, hidden from view.

If you choose to do this, a T25 torx screwdriver should be all you need to remove and replace the liner, once the wheel is off.
 

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Thanks for the heads up Cubes, my car regularly brings half the lane back home with it, the tracks I drive down are shared with tractors and pick ups and in the winter months the steering is a complete waste of time as your simply guided along the ruts.
I jet washed the wheel arches and around the sills last week before I took the car to have a wheel bearing replaced, then had to move the car and spend the next 15 minutes jet washing mud, clay and stones (The amount of them surprised me) off the drive.
 
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