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2015 Elegance Greenline II
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There is an independent VAG that does work that I cannot do near me in Lincoln that charges £239 for cleaning the DPF.
There must be similar near yourself, have you Googled it?

Edit: Have you taken it anywhere to have a forced regen carried out?
 
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Yeti Outdoor 2017 SE L 2.0TDi 150 4x4 Manual
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When you were told the DPF was "blocked", were you told what was causing the blocking? Soot or Oil Ash?
DPFs are supposed to trap soot of course. If that is what is causing the block, then a proper regeneration, as mentioned by Urrel, should cure it. ("Regeneration" means burning off the soot deposits).

What sort of journey pattern do you normally undertake? That may have caused the DPF to become blocked?
Do you have any dashboard indication lights illuminated?
Do you take the car for regular runs of 15-20+ miles on an open road or motorway, where the car can perform its own regeneration?
 

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Yeti Outdoor 2017 SE L 2.0TDi 150 4x4 Manual
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Hi Scarlett.

Getting full of soot is the DPF's job. When it reaches 100% or thereabouts, an automated process should kick in. Whereby when the car detects it is on a longer journey and the temperatures are all up to proper operating level, the car begins to burn a little extra fuel to raise the exhaust gas temperature high enough, for long enough, to burn off the soot. That's a process called "regeneration". Unless you have special software running in an Android phone app though, you can't normally tell when that is taking place, or when it has ended. Nor what the % soot fullness the DPF has reached at any one point in time, between regenerations. In a car that gets a mixed journey pattern regeneration can take place every 4 or 500 miles or so. Less if the journeys are predominantly short and/or urban. If the car never gets a long enough journey for that process to complete though, then the DPF will slowly build up soot and never gets a chance to burn off enough. Eventually it gets way over 100% of normal. That's when fault lights start to appear.

In extreme cases specialist garages (e.g. Skoda or VW) with the right software, can plug the car into laptop that runs a stationary or sometimes rolling road program, that takes the engine hot enough for long enough to perform a "forced regeneration" on the spot. That's a sledgehammer tactic though. In less extreme cases a long enough non-stop main road or motorway run can achieve a regular regeneration perfectly OK, without you even being aware it has taken place.

When you say: "I was told it was blocked with soot, they didn't mention anything about a dpf regeneration though. They suggested I go for a motorway run and leave it in a lower gear but it's not made a difference."
"They" presumably being your garage? Is that an independent general garage, an independent Skoda or VW specialist, or a franchised Skoda dealer?
It would be normal for a garage not to mention the word "regeneration" unless they had reason to believe that word would mean something to you.
A decent motorway run would indeed normally be enough to achieve that, but if the DPF is over-full the regeneration process may take longer to complete.
In extreme cases if a regeneration of any kind has not been possible for a long time, the DPF may become so blocked that regeneration is no longer possible. That is VERY rare though and would have involved ignoring warning lights for a prolonged period.
When you say you did take it for a run but that has not made a difference:
  • How long in time or mileage was the distance you covered?
  • How do you know it did not make a difference? Do you have one or more fault lights illuminated? If so which light(s)?
  • (You have told us very little of the car's symptoms overall, so we have scant information from which to make an assessment).
  • What is your normal daily mileage and journey pattern. Frequency, distances, duration. That sort of thing?
  • On what type of roads? Urban / Rural main road non-stop / motorway.
  • How frequently, if ever, do you undertake longer distance journeys? Of over say 20 miles non-stop? Preferably much longer for a DPF equipped diesel.
  • A regular, non-forced regeneration, triggered by the car itself can take between 10 to 20 miles to complete. Longer if the DPF is badly blocked, which it sounds like yours may be?
  • Which (if any) dashboard warning lights do you have lit?
    DPF light alone means all it needs is a decent length self-regeneration run.
    DPF plus glow plug light means more serious and action needed immediately.
    DPF + Glow Plug + Check Engine lights means DPF is seriously over-blocked and a forced regen at a dealer may not even be enough?
  • There are sometimes other faults that have an impact and mean a self or active regeneration can not take place. Have you had the car's fault codes checked? Or better still read them yourself with a code reader? If so, what fault codes were revealed?
Worst case scenario I've heard of in a Yeti was a driver who ignored all the warnings and just carried on using the car for short journeys for 5-6 months after they first illuminated. Till the pressures inside the engine caused it to grenade itself, blow an injector clean out of the cylinder head and further internal damage that meant a new engine was needed.

I hope that helps?
 

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My Yeti will do an active regeneration on a regular non-motorway journey at speeds of 30-40 mph. No warning lights have ever come on for this, but I always know its regenerating because the idle speed goes up to 1000rpm and there's a distinct roughness and knock to the engine whilst driving. Yesterday this happened about 7 miles from home on a road with mostly a 30 limit. The car was still regenerating close to home, so I took it for a longer drive until it had finished. About 15 miles total of regenerating, but due to traffic about 1/2 hour in duration. It's always a bonus if the car regenerates on dual carriageways or motorways, but these days that's infrequent for me. A badly blocked DPF that's over the threshold for automatic regeneration should give a warning light and at that stage needs investigation. As usual with modern cars, there are other underlying problems that can prevent the regeneration process and a full scan needs to be done to make sure the DPF pressure sensor or any other related sensor isn't causing the problem.
 

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@Mickeyluv I was going to say something similar. There are a few clues it's doing a regen, idle speed at 1000rpm instead of 850rpm (as you state) and stop-start will not activate even with a warm engine with AC/climate control off (I know others always turn stop-start off and the reason they do). I've not noticed and "roughness" but I'll look out for this in future. Also if you stop and switch off the engine before it completes, the engine fans will stay on and be really loud.

From the last couple of regens mines done where I have caught them using VAGDPF, it seems as long as it "makes room" that will be enough for it if you interrupt it somehow i.e. the last regen only took the Soot Mass down to the 50% level, if my wife had kept driving it would have gone down further no doubt, and if I know it's doing a regen (using the clues as above with no DPF light) I do try to do this. There seems no need for a "continuous run at 40mph+ above 2000rpm" or whatever the conditions stated are, just driving about is fine. Although a more complete regen is likely if done like that I suspect.
 

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Yeti Outdoor 2017 SE L 2.0TDi 150 4x4 Manual
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There seems no need for a "continuous run at 40mph+ above 2000rpm" or whatever the conditions stated are, just driving about is fine. Although a more complete regen is likely if done like that I suspect.
Depends entirely what "just driving about" entails? For users like yourself, who habitually travel sufficiently long trip mileages (may be as little as 8-10 miles per journey if other conditions are all met), and on roads were a degree of continuous running is feasible, that is undoubtedly correct. (y) As mentioned in some editions of the handbooks. The Yeti's engine management software is exceptionally good at figuring when an active regen might be feasible and therefore having a go at burning off the DPF soot mass by itself. And YES - a regen can be detected without VAG DPF, IF you are particularly sensitive and observant of the car's idiosyncrasies. That level of perception may be not where some drivers are at though? Hence why the car does not actively tell you when it is performing a regen. In case that itself triggered a majority of drivers to think something was wrong? (Some cars do - and warn you to continue driving when a regen is ongoing?) Drivers who have little concept or desire to know what is going on under the bonnet for example? Not saying Scarlett is one of those? We have no prior knowledge to go by on that score? Other than posts #1 and #4, which are themselves rather brief and cryptic.

We're still waiting for the OP to give us a clue what sort of mileages and typical trip distances she uses her car for though? For how long she's had an issue with the DPF, etc. What triggered her to seek for the diagnosis mentioned in #1? Who that was from? How long a journey did she undertake to try to allow an active regen? Are there any other faults present that make a regen unfeasible, etc. etc.? Without more information, I fear we have collectively got as far as we can?
 
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