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2012 Yeti 1.4tsi Elegance
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Discussion Starter #1
Since the weather got much colder i've been noticing as i pull away or accelerate small clouds of smoke in the rear view mirror, not to dissimilar to when the engine is cold. But this is when the engine is at full temperature after long runs. On days when the temperature is warmer it doesn't seem to be noticeable and seems to happen exclusively with cold weather. Anyone had any experience of this and if i need to get it checked? i wondered if there is water vapour in the fumes or if its burning oil? i did have a watch from the back and it didn't look like blue oil smoke, but it was just ticking over.

Any suggestions welcome! its the 1.4 tsi which has done 55k. Thanks
 

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Water is produced as a bi-product of the combustion process. In a cold exhaust this water can condense and can be seen dripping out of the exhaust or as clouds of white water vapour. As the exhaust warms up this water vapour is not visible. I guess this cold weather, part of the exhaust system away from the engine doesn't get warm enough.
Hopefully this is what is happening in your case.
 

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I guess this cold weather, part of the exhaust system away from the engine doesn't get warm enough.
Hopefully this is what is happening in your case.
This is definitely what happens on mine (y)
 

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Yeti S+ 2010, 2.0 TDi CR110. 2WD Manual. 232,000 mls.
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First thought is what Davej said. In properly cold climates (such as central Canada), every combustion engined vehicle is followed by a small cloud of whitish grey "smoke", a.k.a. steam, for miles. Till the entire exhaust system gets fully up to a temperature where the colourless vapour doesn't condense to tiny droplets any more. Even then, there's a cloud curling up a couple of feet behind the tail pipe. Principle is not dissimilar to the vapour trails that appear behind jet aircraft at high altitude, where the air is always considerably below zero.

If smoke was blue, and went away when the engine was hot, then I would be thinking worn valve guides allowing oil past the valves into the combustion chambers, till the head gets properly warmed so the gaps close up.
 

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Quote Flintstone '...every combustion engined vehicle is followed by a small cloud of whitish grey "smoke", a.k.a. steam, for miles..'
From one pedant to another: steam is an invisible gas whereas the visible exhaust emissions are condensate. The emissions from a steam engine chimney are the products produced after the steam changes from a gas phase into a liquid phase. I may let you off if you are referring to wet steam!
 
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The emissions from a steam engine chimney also includes a lot of combustion by-product in the form of smoke and ash that get drawn through the boiler tubes from the firebox, using the gas velocity of exhaust steam from the blastpipe to shove it up yer petticoat.

I think maybe the smell of live steam is one of the things I am missing most in lockdown. Vwey hard when you can 't visit your local railway...

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RH&DLR?
 
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Ah memories Spag from the days when I volunteered at the NYMR. I loved the sounds and smells, especially the lovely tarry smell from the coal. The wonderful engineering (has anyone been watching Fred Dibnah on BBC4?) and the power produced by classics such as Sir Nigel Gresley, as well as the sound of its chime whistle. Although it was wise to take shelter as it left owing to the amount of wet black crud spouting out of the chimney. (As with ships, engines are referred to as ‘she’ but I cannot call a classic Black 5 she as they are so butch).
 

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I had the privilege of visiting Fred Dibnah's house shortly after he died and it was a "Heritage Centre". Tea and a biscuit in his kitchen, plus free reign of his garden and workshops with a brilliant talk by the chap who went on Fred's last tour. Freds old jumpers were still hanging in his workshops, however the premises were broken into shortly after his death and many of the brass fittings stolen from his engines. It was really good seeing the fruits of his labour.
There was a very sharp turn off the road into his garden with a steep downward slope. When approaching from the main road Fred could not turn into his garden and would drive past to a make a U turn in the petrol station at the end of his road in a steam powered traction engine. Now that is something I would really have liked to see. Sadly, Leon decided to retire and could not find a buyer for Fred's place, everything was sold off and there is now nothing left.
 

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