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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited by Moderator)
Having recently installed and coded a towbar, these 'Hints and Tips' may help others who are considering installing one themselves.
This will probably be more likely to help the less experienced and is not intended to teach the old hands to suck eggs.


Hints and Tips on Towbar Installation
Introduction

There are a number of articles and Yetipedia posts on here that show various installation diagrams or 'how to' notes that are very useful when going through the towbar installation process. In this article. I will try to tie these together but will also offer a few tips and hints which should help anyone considering installing a towbar on their Yeti. Please bear in mind that these are just my experiences and opinions as a non-professional.

The estimated times for the installation are wildly optimistic unless you have others helping and you are very familiar with how to remove the many panels involved and where all the various bits are located.. I was very keen to do a better than professional job and so took my time to do all the little extras you wouldn't normally get (cleaning and protecting bits that would be hard to reach otherwise). It took me about 3 days. You can do the entire job without the use of a pit or raising the vehicle but I do suggest that you do so under cover. As I will explain later, unless you are really confident about altering wiring systems, I would suggest you don't do the electrics. If you have the use of VCDS, the coding is very quick and easy (but be careful!!)

Before you disconnect the battery, make sure you have the radio code. On later models, the radio will connect itself when you re-attach the battery. Sinclairs in Swansea wanted £60 to tell me my radio code before then informing me I didn't need one!

Choosing the kit

I had three criteria when choosing the towbar and dedicated wiring:
1. The equipment should be of good quality.
2. The finished job must not be unsightly.
3. The cost should as low as possible consistent with the above

The towbar. Early on, I discarded the idea of a removable ball on the grounds of cost and additional complexity of installing removable panels and frames.

The concern then was as to whether the ball would interfere with the reversing sensors. I chose to go for a swan neck type as that was less likely to cause problems than the detachable flange type. In the event, that was the right decision.

There appeared to be only two options in the 'non-visible' category. The Bosal, which was cheaper, but out of stock everywhere, with no supply dates and the Westfalia which was more expensive but immediately available. In the event, the bumper cuts for the Westfalia are virtually non-visible and I am happy with the look.

The dedicated electrics. The obvious choices where the Westfalia and ECS systems. I went for the ECS on two grounds. Firstly, it routes all the way down the RHS side of the car and so is better protected. With the Westfalia system, it starts on the left and the loom then crosses the floor under the rear seats to go over to the right. Incidentally, the wiring instruction for the Jaeger system Wikipedia Note 18 are for a LHD car and so would have the same problem crossing over as the Westfalia. This could present issues. The second, lesser reason is that the ECS system is substantially cheaper (£130 if you shop around).



Installing the towbar


References:

Westfalia non detachable towbar instructions (Technical) link
Yetipedia Note19 Bosal towbar fitting instuctions. link

Even if you are fitting the Westfalia system, read through the Bosal instructions. They are far more comprehensive on how to remove the rear lights, panels and bumper. On my car, there was no connector in the reversing sensor cable as shown in the Bosal instructions. Be prepared to have some wooden blocks handy to put under the bumper to take the strain off that cable.

I unclipped the lower section of the bumper as this will make the subsequent cutting and refitting much easier. The instructions don't mention this.

Fitting the towbar is straightforward although you might need to loosely fit one bolt first and use a bit of persuasion to line up the other holes.

Once the towbar is fitted, this would be a good time to spray or paint the bar and the entire area with Waxoil or the like. You may be glad of that in a few years time.

At this point do not reassemble anything, go on to installing the wiring kit.


When you do the cut out (maybe later) think about taking a little extra (5mm?) out in the area marked red (diagram below) to give the socket cover enough clearance to open. Failing that, you will have to tilt the socket downwards a little to prevent the hinged cover fouling. Remember....'Measure twice and cut once!!' If you are marking and cutting from the inside, which is easiest, that everything will be opposite handed to the diagram below



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Installing the wiring

References:

ECS wiring instructions (Technical) link
Yetipedia No17 Westfalia Wiring instructions link
No18 Jaeger wiring instructions link
No51 Fuse board link
Glove box removal (How to) link

Diagram numbers following will refer to ECS instructions.



ESC PDF at end of post (forum will not allow it to be placed here)

Tools

In addition to other tools, you will need a terminal extractor similar to this: Only the Jaeger instructions refer to this

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You can buy a VAG set which is £20-30 or there are cheaper versions on eBay for a couple of quid or so. I didn't manage to acquire one in time and trying to get the wires out of the sockets by other means was an absolute nightmare. Get the proper tool if you can.

Installation

The ECS instructions are generally very good with just a few omissions and minor errors. These diagrams will make a useful addition as there is no mention of the side panels or the glove box.

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The double outlet grommet ('T' in the parts list) will not slide over the reversing sensor cable connector, so you will need to slit it vertically, insert the sensor cable and superglue the cut back again. Be careful with the glue as you don't want it sticking to the cable.

Diagrams 10 to 16 and 20 to 21. .Be very careful when unclipping the various connectors as bits will snap off.

The dashboard fuse box layout (Yetipedia No 51) is very useful here. As my gearbox is manual, I used fuse positions 1,2 and 3. If yours is DSG, you will need to use 2,3 and 8, which is a bit more difficult to get to.


The diagram below (23) on the right below appears to be off a LHD car despite the one on the left being off a RHD. I could not locate the bolt shown, so had to mount the relay on the frame near the right of the low dash panel. Be careful though as this may touch the panel when it is replaced. The relay base may need to be mounted at a jaunty angle to prevent fouling.


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Diagram 17. Routing the cable through to the engine compartment is not easy. The glove box needs to come out - instructions on page below. Once the nipple is cut off, I found it easiest to go from the engine compartment inwards. You will need a stiff piece of wire or and old car aerial or something similar to force past the main wiring loom. If you use an old coat hanger or the like, make sure you smooth off the end or tape it up as there is a danger of tearing up the loom as you force it in. Keep rotating the wire as you are pushing and eventually with a lot of grunting and heaving the wire will appear behind where the glove box was. If you fix the ECS cable to the wire, make absolutely sure you have a strong connection and that the whole thing tapers towards the engine compartment - a little silicone grease will help to pull it through.


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Diagram 18 and 19 Once the cable is through, I found the neatest way was to run it between the battery and the fuse box.

The instructions mention the double fuse holder but not how to fix it down. It is not a good idea to leave it floating around, so I drilled two holes into the front of the engine compartment fuse box lid and clipped the double fuse holder on using a reusable cable tie.

Before you finish off, make sure all the cables are firmly fixed down with cable ties or duct tape where ties won't reach to prevent future rattles and chaffing. Not easy behind the dash board but try to get in as many as you can. One every 15cm with the cable fixed on the back side of the towbar will make a secure job.

You can test the basic functions/lights before you code by using a trailer board or connecting directly to your trailer/caravan....or a proper tester if you can get your hands on one.

Coding using VCDS

I was dreading this part, but it was quick and easy. Do take the precaution of reading The Hood's warning in .........and do not rush it.

If all the business of long codes and short codes is a bit confusing, I have produced the 'Dummies' Guide below which should make it all straight forward.
A properly coded trailer set-up should:
1. Disable the parking sensors.
2. Disable the car's foglight.
3. Enable the trailer stability programme
4. Enable trailer bulb failure warning.
5. Enable trailer theft alarm activation.
6. Show a picture of a connected trailer on the radio screen when reversing.
There is a Youtube video which helps. If in doubt, refer to the Ross-Tech website

Simple sequence

This worked for my 2015 Yeti. Earlier models or those without reversing sensors may well be different??

19 Can Gateway
Installation list
69 Trailer
Save Coding
Coding accepted (small icon)
Close Controller - Go Back 06
10 Park Steer/Assist
Coding 07
Long code helper
Bit 0-3
01 Trailer Hitch Installed
Exit (top left)
Do It ?? (Bottom Left)
Coding accepted (small icon)
Close Controller - Go Back 06 - Done.
 

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A very good write up. A couple of questions,

1 are you happy for it to go in the Yetipedia?
2 would you object to Yetipedia references to be turned into links?
3 do we have/can you supply a copy of the esc wiring?
4 there are six thumbnails, are there any others that need including?
5 would you object to the thumbnails being "put in their place"?

assuming 1=yes I will add a link to this thread to my Yetipedia additions list, a bit busy getting something else ready at the moment, I might not be around much from Thursday until the end of the month so it might be a few days before it is added.

This post will be removed when the above is completed.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
A very good write up. A couple of questions,

1 are you happy for it to go in the Yetipedia?
2 would you object to Yetipedia references to be turned into links?
3 do we have/can you supply a copy of the esc wiring?
4 there are six thumbnails, are there any others that need including?
5 would you object to the thumbnails being "put in their place"?

assuming 1=yes I will add a link to this thread to my Yetipedia additions list, a bit busy getting something else ready at the moment, I might not be around much from Thursday until the end of the month so it might be a few days before it is added.

This post will be removed when the above is completed.
Thank you and for your efforts on this.

1. Yes, I’m honoured ?
2. No, very happy with that
3. I posted ESC installation instructions in Technical a few days ago.
4+5. I think the six thumbnails will be sufficient. I did try to copy the diagrams into the file but it didn’t work. You can still see the spaces in the text, so it would be great if you can re-insert them.
 

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I found the ECS pdf, I'll put it into the post when I get round to it. If you find or think of anything else you want added just post it and I'll join it all up.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
That’s great thanks. Have just noticed that in the paragraph on ‘Coding using VCDS’, I mention your warning on VCDS but forgot to put the reference in (where the ..... is)
 
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