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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello. I have just bought a 2010 1.2 TSI Yeti. I am very conscious of the potential problems with the timing chain and the cost of replacement along with water pump etc. A thought crossed my mind, though; is it possible to replace the engine with a later 1.2 unit with the rubber belt? Has anyone done this? Certainly there is a company that has put an Audi TT engine into a Yeti, so it proves that anything is possible! Always subject to cost, though. Possible problems may be more like computer and wiring compatibility? Anyway, I'm just trying to look ahead as an engine upgrade may only be three times the cost of a single chain / pump renewal, but be more hassle-free in the long run? Thank You, Ian.
 

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The timing chain will only need replacing if it has a problem, the belt needs replacing every 5 years, replacing the 1.2 unit with a cambelt will cost £thousands.
 

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It would not be cost effective,best stick with what you have. The fitting cost could be £1,000+ and there would be numerous complications such as radiator connections,air filter differences,ecu difference.The end cost would be frightening! A non starter...
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for all your comments. I suppose I am really just interested in the feasability of the conversion as, in principle, anything is possible (Has anyone ever done it?)! Besides the Audi TT engine installation I understand that an electric conversion is available. But that, no doubt, will be the subject of a future discussion! Otherwise, I will stay with my chain! I just don't like the front styling of later Yeti but perhaps I'll come round in time! Best Wishes, Ian
 

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Hi Ian, since they cloned that sheep I guess anything is possible. One of my favourite one liners from frasier :)
 
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I think I would just fit a new high quality chain and guides rather than change the entire engine.
I do like the idea of an electric Yeti, but would it still tow my caravan and happily cover 200 miles without charging, while still maintaining all 5 seats and a boot, I think not.
 

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Yeti Outdoor 2017 SEL TDi150 4x4 Manual
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I do like the idea of an electric Yeti, but would it still tow my caravan and happily cover 200 miles without charging, while still maintaining all 5 seats and a boot, I think not.
Also check out how much CO2 is produced globally during battery manufacture. See this vid.
Specially at 12 minutes onwards. Although the entirety is highly relevant.

How many full battery EVs are homologated for towing? A few hybrids certainly?

EVs make sense to reduce reduce NOx in city centres. Anywhere else? Only thing "zero emissions" is at the metaphorical tail pipe.
Hybrids make much more sense due to very much smaller batteries and reduced fuel costs.
 
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Yeti Outdoor 2017 SEL TDi150 4x4 Manual
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If you want long distance go hydrogen, fast fill at a fuel station.
Agreed. Especially when/if it is used to power a fuel cell.

When used in a internal combustion engine. It’s only problem is that still produces NOx comparable with a petrol or diesel, because it burns hot enough to oxidise the N2 in the air. The NOx can however be controlled easily using Adblue and SCR.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Gosh. I did not know that I would open a can of worms! Being in my 70s, I suppose that petrol-based vehicles will last me out. I part-exed my 1.9 diesel 140bhp Yeti for the 1.2 petrol. Main problem was that I generally do low mileages and average 30mph even on motorways (ok.. perhaps slightly higher..lol ). Anyway, I am just interested to look into the future and liked the idea of a rubber cam belt. But I do take the point of fitting an upgraded chain kit. The comments made by other honorable posters seem to indicate that lithium battery-powered cars are even worse due to their poor environmental footprint during manufacture. They are also fire prone in cases of crashes which causes the lithium batteries to self-combust and the fire not being able to be subdued. (I have heard that in Germany, a fire appliance has to follow a wrecked car to garage / scrapyard due to lithium batteries re-igniting) It is also reasonably presumed that electric vehicles may still not have the torque required to pull four people, luggage and caravan. Hydrogen power does seem the way to go! I don't want to protract this discussion, but I find it very interesting. If all the above does have a grain of truth in it, then why is it being pursued? Why not extend the internal combustion engine life until both a SAFE and Environmentally friendly answer is found. (In 25 years time, ish, would you want to live near a car scrapyard that has piles of "old" elec vehicles for dismantling. "Time Bomb" comes to mind....) Sorry, I'm rambling on. (Men in white coats knocking at my front door) Best Wishes, Ian.
 

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Years ago, the government wanted everyone to drive diesel now a different government has a different obsession, I can't help but think that VAG stoked the whole thing up with their software cheat.
4x4 Response members are told if they find a driver in need of help and it is electric, don't touch it, phone a breakdown company, if it is damaged and there are people inside phone emergency services don't even touch the vehicle. One of our members is a fireman, he went on a week-long course dealing with electric vehicles and he says he dreads the time he will have to deal with one.
 

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As regards the engine swap, it would be a lot bigger job than you think

The later cambelt engine is a twincam 16V and it has the turbo on the bulkhead side of the engine opposite to the earlier 8V Chain driven unit.

As such the entire intake system from airbox through charge cooler to engine is entirely different as is the exhaust an emission systems. The fuel injection system is different as well as the various ECU's

It would be far cheaper just to trade the car in and buy a later model.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
As regards the engine swap, it would be a lot bigger job than you think

The later cambelt engine is a twincam 16V and it has the turbo on the bulkhead side of the engine opposite to the earlier 8V Chain driven unit.

As such the entire intake system from airbox through charge cooler to engine is entirely different as is the exhaust an emission systems. The fuel injection system is different as well as the various ECU's

It would be far cheaper just to trade the car in and buy a later model.
Thank you for confirming the detail differences. As previously mentioned, I shall be remaining with my chain driven version especially as I prefer the earlier "bug Eyed" design!
 

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While there's no denying that there was a potential flaw in early chain driven engines I do wonder what percentage of them did in fact suffer significant problems and then in turn what percentage of those were more the result of lax servicing, including failing to use the recommended oil which, let's face it, is expensive making it a tempting target for the less well informed or the strapped for cash to economise on.

Or how much of it is the natural phenomena of only ever hearing about the bad stuff?
 

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While there's no denying that there was a potential flaw in early chain driven engines I do wonder what percentage of them did in fact suffer significant problems and then in turn what percentage of those were more the result of lax servicing, including failing to use the recommended oil which, let's face it, is expensive making it a tempting target for the less well informed or the strapped for cash to economise on.

Or how much of it is the natural phenomena of only ever hearing about the bad stuff?
The early 1.2 tsi,and some 1.4 models from 2009-2011 were fitted with poor quality chains,though a small percentage did last longer.The chain was made larger in late 2011 ,and the lubrication was improved,0.3 litres extra sump capacity too.
Not only were the chains weak,and stretched,the tension design was poor and not enough lubricant reached the chain.
VW knew they engine was flawed but denied it,finally burying it in 2015 with a new cam belt engine brought out. Even with correct oil and filter replaced regularly this engine was not going to be long lived.
 
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