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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited by Moderator)
I am considering purchasing a Yeti and am at the stage of firstly trying to determine which version is best suited to my needs and secondly trying to understand how the Yeti 4x4 drivetrain works.

The reviews of the Yeti praise both its on-road and off-road capabilities. This is a deciding factor for me because the vehicle will be used equally in town, on the motorway and on country tracks.

1. Version

The two versions that I am currently considering are:
Skoda Yeti 2.0 TDI CR 4x4 SE 140bhp Diesel
Skoda Yeti 1.8 TSI 4x4 158bhp Petrol

2. Yeti 4x4 Drivetrain

I am more familiar with 4-wheel drive systems that employ two gearshifts as one will find on a vehicle such as a Toyota Hilux. I am not familiar with electronic 4x4 systems. I don't understand how a "Haldex 4 drivetrain" or "Haldex clutch" works and the term "DSG twin-clutch" means nothing to me.

I would be most grateful to receive feedback on either or both of the above Yeti versions and an explanation or a document on the Yeti drivetrain.

TiA

T.
 

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Basically the Haldex engages the rear drive train when needed. The electronics are monitoring the wheel rotation and when it senses that one or more wheelsare slipping the four wheel drive engages.If you have a serious interest in how the Haldex system works, there are a number of learned papers available on the Web.
All I know (or care) is that it does work when I need it, as does the "off-road" button. I have been through two severe winters and this year's floods without any problem. This is on the standard tyres as I could not afford the extra luxury of winter tyres.
My money would go to the Diesel. The engine is very good and the updated diesel is more economical than mine. I get 43 MPG on short runs and 48 MPG on longer ones. I think I would trusta diesel in the recent floods more than petrol but I have no experience with a petrol Yeti so this is just my opinion.
I say this to stop the flood of mail telling me the petrol is the best engine ever!!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Terfyn for your opinion.

I thought that the purpose of the "Off-Road" button was to activate the Haldex Clutch. Based on what you have written it seems as if I was mistaken. If I understand you correctly the Haldex system is always "on" and engages the rear drive train at any time when it may be needed. What then does the "Off-Road" button actually do ?

Unfortunately Skoda's UK website has no technical information. The view possibly is the people in general are not really interested in the technicalities. But then there are always at least some people who like to understand the underlying engineering in a product.

T.
 

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The "off-road" button remaps the use of the electronic safety control. It is not easy to explain but the car behaves in a more secure and stable manner. The accelerator literally controls the speed, lift off and the brakes are applied. The skid sensors are made more sensitive and the car's slow speed handling is uprated. As far as I know the Haldex may be permanently engaged to give 4 wheel drive.
You are right, under normal conditions the Haldex is always available and will engage when the system needs it. There is no positive way of knowing if the car is in 2 or 4 wheel drive. i.e. nothing lights up or flashes.

We live in a very rural area. We are lucky if we see the gritter more than once through a bad winter. As I said the 09/10 and 10/11 winters tested the Yeti and it performed well. I am not claiming that we had no skids but the system along with careful driving saw us through.
I tell the story of a steep hill in Criccieth, covered in packed snow and ice. A van passed us and slid back, it tried twice more before giving up. I set off in 1st with the off-road engaged, we reached the top of the hill with some minor slipping but no drama. I didn't expect we would do it - I was wrong.
 

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the 4x4 off road button.
we do a lot of shooting and therefor the yeti is in normal 4x4 on ploughed feilds but when the ground is slippy and boggy engage the off road button and feel the difference altogether as the wheel are then under its own electroinic management using braking with drive.
its like a magic button and it hasnt let me down as yet-i
 

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Terfyn has summed it all up very well but I thought I would add another voice to his comments. As he says it works automatically, the Off Road button is only really needed when going through a field or if the snow is really bad. It makes the car extra sensitive. Your could go through your whole ownership period and not press it without missing out. Haldex is brilliant and works without you as the driver realising. People are used to pressing an engage button to get 4wd but this is not needed with Haldex. It really is as good as Terfyn states, I went through 2 bad Northumberland winters without missing a beat in my Yeti. Thoroughly recommended.
 

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I'll echo what has been already said about the Haldex system. I've yet to experience it fully in the Yeti but a previous Octavia 4x4 had it and it allowed me to climb a not so steep hill on my way home one evening in snow. Leaving a set of lights to go up the hill, a main road just outside Bradford, there was an Audi (2WD), a Landrover, me and a 2WD golf. The land rover turned off to the left after the lights and I could see the Audi was having problems as his back end was sliding left and right. Looking in the rearview mirror the Golf was still at the lights. The Audi pulled over and I just drove past it as normal only to get stuck behind a landrover towing, or attempting to tow a transit. Once they pulled over I just drove past and made it home.


You may not need it that often but when you do you really appreciate how well it works. I'd also suggest you try out the off road button under controlled conditions before you actually need to use it in anger. I tried it out when going down our cul-de-sac just to see how well it controlled the descent. I was most impressed and now have a better feeling for what it can do so come the bad weather I'll have no hesitation in using it.



Keith
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Firstly I would like to thank everyone who responded to my question. Your answers have been very helpful and have certainly convinced me that for my purposes the Yeti will be the perfect vehicle.

I don't intend to conquer the Amazon jungle in the Yeti (assuming there is any jungle left to conquer) but I do need a vehicle that will give me (and more importantly the love-of-my-life) a comfortable, relatively quick, drive on the motorway but will also enable me to go off the beaten-track on some fairly unfriendly roads (tracks).

I will also at times be towing a small Van-type Trailer (Bateson 120V), but this will only be on paved or at least very good unpaved roads. Typically the Trailer plus load will be well within the 750kg max loading.

There are also times when I will need to fold down or forward or perhaps even remove the rear seats so as to obtain maximum internal load space. One small area of concern is that every review that I have read has mentioned that the rear-seats are very heavy. YouTube videos show younger and better-built fellows than I putting in what appears to be abnormal effort to lift out the rear seats. Any comments on this...?

I am still undecided as to whether I should go for the Yeti 2.0 TDI CR 4x4 SE 140bhp Diesel or the Yeti 1.8 TSI 4x4 158bhp Petrol. Both seem to have their plus points. I have only once previously owned a Diesel-powered vehicle and that was extremely frustrating as it was about as nimble as a three-toed Sloth..... actually that is an insult to the Sloth, it was slower than that.

So any comments (thanks already to Terfyn for recommending the Diesel) about the desireability of either of the above versions will be gratefully read and considered.

TiA

T.
 

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My previous cars were a 150bhp petrol turbo Octavia 4x4 and a 140bhp diesel 2WD Octavia. The petrol Octavia was gutless below 2000rpm until the turbo cut in whereas with the diesel the power was there all the time. Modern diesels are as good as petrol and having driven both I prefer the diesel. The diesel also had a better fuel consumption 40mpg compared to 27mpg for the petrol Octavia. Although diesel is more expensive the better mpg results in a lower cost per mile. The VED may also be cheaper.


My Yeti (140bhp diesel 4x4 Elegance) is currently running at approx 36mpg overall but that should improve as the weather gets better and the engine gets "run in"



At the end of the day it's your choice. Try driving both before you make the final decision.



Don't forget that onthe SE the off road button isnot standard and will need to be specified as an option.



Keith
Edited by: KeithW
 

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My 140bhp 4x4 deisel shows an average of 52mpg on the maxidot over 12000 miles in 11 months, allowing for a little optimism by the Maxidot that is probably more like 45/46 in reallity. This is my first deisel and it is suprisingly fast. A couple of points to think about are, with a modern deisel you will have a deisel particulat filter (DPF) which means that if you do short stop start journeys and/or a low annual milage petrol may be better, look up DPF on Honest John or Google, that said I have not had any problems with mine and have not been made aware of when regeneration has taken place.Also towbar preparation is just thatand does not actually include a towbar. The Yeti has a canbus electrical system which means if the towbar is correctly fitted and mapped to the cars "brain" anything you tow becomes "part of the car". Towbar fitting can be quite expensive. make sure you test drive a petrol and a deisel, but beware, if you testdrive a Yeti you will want one!


Edited by: The Hood
 

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I will go with all the comments made so far, as for the petrol vdiesel,I had the 1.2 petrol yeti and found it a little gem. But needed the 4x4 so I it had to be the 110 diesel, both are around the same power all but a few horses.

My feeling after going from petrol to diesel is, the 110 even with the extra of 4x4 and the extra weight of engine and gearbox has the edge, moreconstant power trough the revs and good fueleconomy (46 - 49 mpg ).

The DPF puts the fear of god into a lot ofpotentialowners, but mine spends all week doing short stop start runs only just getting up to temp on the run to work, (if the outside temp is above 3 any lower and it willnot get tonormaltemp) But apart from theoccasional regen it has been no problem in 15k, it get a few longer harder runs at the weekend when I get it back from SWMBO


Hope this is helps, try a fewdifferent power yetis and see which one is right for you, hope to see you as a new owner soon

Kevin
 

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If you do less than 12000 each year then petrol is the choice. If you do more than12000 then it's diesel. That's purely on the basis of the costs of motoring.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Once again thanks for the comments, which are really helpful.

KeithW - I was not aware that the "Off Road" button is optional on the SE. Thanks for the heads-up on that. That also probably excludes the SE as an option.

The Hood - Interesting info on towing and the electrical system. Hopefully the CANbus is more reliable on the Yeti than it is on some VW's which have had their fair share of electrical hiccups.

WakeV - I agree the DPF is a concern - especially as I am considering starting off with a used vehicle before committing to a new vehicle. Even with the Skoda warranty there is no way of knowing how the previous owner used the vehicle. So that does concern me about the Diesel option.

DerwentYeti - If we ignore completely the "cost of motoring", then in your view, which is the better option Petrol or Diesel?

T.
 

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The Off-Road button is an option when ordering from new. If you are looking to buy a used Yeti, many of the earlier ones were ordered with the Off-Road. If Iremember correctly, the Elegance came with it as standard.The DPF is perceived as a concern, in reality, it causes no problem. If you are only using the Yeti to go to the shops or the school run then the DPF would clean itself on a regular basis. But with that scenario you would probably go for a petrol version anyway. A previous owner would need to have abused the car badly for the DPF to be a worry to a new owner. A scan of the onboard computer may give an idea of the history of the DPF. Mine has cleaned itself - as far as I'm aware - about five times in three years.
Again IMO your choice of diesel or petrol would depend on your use of the car. Towing, off road use, rural or long journeys, I would opt for diesel. Short commutes, school run etc. - petrol.
 

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Hi Gang. a few obs, 1. the partical filter you can forget about, unless it goes wrong. 2. off road button, it is a optional extra on theSE but well worth every penny. 3. ive just put 1000 songs and audio books on a SD card to play when and when, dont bother because you will always want to update your own personal bit.
and the tow ball, yes you can get a pre install, ready for the actual ball/hook but our yeti man says we can have one fitted at any time at around £200 stirling which is about average to most make of car, and the off road handling with the button is second to none. ive had land rovers from the series one 86in wheel base through the disco (never out of the garage) and range rover plus the volvo xc 70 and apart from the yeti the range rover was about the best of the bunch the volvo the worse for off road, wheel base too long i think, whereas the yeti has it all for the price, Ive just had mine up to the axles in mud and needed the ORB thankyou yeti for that bit of design life lineEdited by: adobedon
 

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I have been told that a Yeti spare wheel is an "optional extra" and has to be purchased separately. I have owned many vehicles, but this is a first for me. Is this true...


Feedback that I received from a current owner is as follows :

"....the spare wheel is an afterthought and when separately purchased and installed encroaches on the boot and compromises the Varioflex system so that, for all practical purposes, it is rendered unusable....... at any one time you can either have a spare wheel or the Varioflex system but not both at the same time...."


I find the above difficult to accept, so would appreciate some clarification from the Forum.

TiA

T.
 

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Yup it's true. Yeti is not the only one to go down this route. You get a bottle of sealant and an air pump.
I had a puncture. Used the sealant and air pump. Wrecks the tyre but, fortunately, I needed replacement tyres all round. (1st set lasted 18000 miles) I got a replacement sealant pack from National Tyres.

The spare is, if I remember correctly, a "skinny" and is limited to 50 mph.
 

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The spare is a 195/60/16 and is H rated, which means the tyre is physicaly capable of 130mph which is more than the Yeti itself. The reason for the speed limitation is that the size differs from the others. I ordered mine at the same time as the car at a cost of £84. For that you get a full spec tyre and a regular steel wheel not the usual "biscuit" supplied with other makes, a wheel brace, jack, boot mouldings (storage boxes) to surround the spare, and a floorcover.
If boot space could be an issue sometimes, get a tin of gunk and a compressor from Ebay. Then when you need maximum space remove the spare wheel and fittings and carry the compressor and can of gunk. One word of warning, if you do have a problem with a tyre which the gunk canot fix and need rescuing don't expect to get a replacement tyre for much less than list price as you will be a captive market.
As regards getting a towbar fitted for £200 that would not even get you a decent bar without itbeing fitted. Let alone with a dedicated loom and mapping. Be very carefull and call a couple of reputable fitters they will charge nothing for a quote over the phone. The one on the link below is well spoken of by Yeti owners.
http://www.philtaylortowbars.co.uk/

Edited by: The Hood
 

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Spare Wheel.

BEWARE!!

Garages in the UK will not work or repair tyres that have been inflated with theEmergency puncture kit.
And yes the spare would take too much room in the "boot" also you would have to purchase a new floor kit to raise it over the new spare wheel, unless you put it on the roof rack. it wont fit in the glove box either haha
You have in the "boot" a compressor for inflating slowpuncturesor overnight let downs, and a aerosol tin of a latex type stuff for punctures that are a little morepersistent,
the aerosol will work only if you can get air in the tyre inside areasonabletime 10-20 secs then I would get to the nearest garage.
Just a tip, if you do a lot of off road like I do then make sure you have access to adescent plank of wood, (metal would be better) to put a jack on if you go down the road of buying a spare wheel,
the extra cost you would have with buying a spare would include, jack, wheel brace, red triangle, hub cap remover, boot kit to raise the floor and of course the spare with tyre,
buy the wayHappy new year
 

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Discussion Starter #20
The "Spare Wheel Story" is a real pain in the rear end.....

A quick check on the Skoda Parts website shows that a spare, floor and toolkit cost £256.00. Not overly expensive except that there is no place to put it and a video shows that the rear space and the Varioflex System is totally compromised.

A recent survey by a well-known cosumer magazine revealed that of the almost 1,400 persons interviewed only 16 people said that they were OK with the puncture repair kit. And as for the AA - they absolutely hate punture repair kits - on average they get 65 calls per day from people who don't know how to use the repair kit.

Even VW does not have a coherent policy with regards to spare wheels. They have two different policies depending on who you ask....

When asked about Volkswagen, they said "....Our customers expect a Volkswagen to have a spare wheel, not a repair
kit. It also helps to keep consumers happier in the event of a puncture
if they have a spare wheel..."

When asked about Skoda, they said "....We use this puncture repair kit in our overall strive for
environmentally friendly car operation to decrease weight and improve
efficiency...."

Nice to know that even VW can get confused about their policies and priorities


A 4x4 vehicle that does not come with a spare wheel as standard (and a
place to put it) is IMHO, totally bonkers...... this is not a BMW that
is going to be driven almost exclusively on the motorway, this is a 4x4
which one expects will pick up a flat tyre from time to time.

Skoda do have a useful Video at this address https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bsGJyfA2QKk


T.
 
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