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And that's from someone whose correct Loyal, after dinner toast to the Monarch, remains "To the Duke of Lancaster".
You must forgive me for being a pedantic b*****d Flintstone, but it is bad form to toast Her Majesty as the Duke of Lancaster, anywhere except in the county itself.

At formal dinners, when we used to toast “The Queen” our resident Lancastrian would add “The Duke of Lancaster” to be followed by the rest of us bellowing “ shut up Harold”. It happened so often, it became a tradition. Very sadly the said Harold died quite recently.

ps According to Debretts, which you will understand that I spend all my spare time studying 😉, The DoL toast may be given elsewhere in the country but only at Lancastrian events...😴😵😴😵
 

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Flintstone - had I not tried to use the e-brake at 5 mph and stopped so abruptly, I'd have thought 'what a good idea to try a handbrake turn - oh s**t'.
That’s the biggest thing I don't like about e-brakes. They are mostly either 100% ON or 100% OFF. Very little opportunity to finesse how much degree of on or off. Then they are generally way too slow operating to be usable for actions like swinging the rear end wide to tighten the car’s line through a hairpin bend. Fine for use as a parking brake as they are intended though.

To give that instantaneous action and control finesse, rally cars normally utilise a hydraulic hand brake that operates the main brakes, but just on the rear wheels only. Actually not as difficult to achieve as it sounds, by placing a lever operated master cylinder into the hydraulic lines headed for the rear wheels. All ABS functionality has to be thrown out or disabled though. To remain MoT legal though, which demands (or did) mechanical operation of a parking brake. The normal trick was to string regular cables to the rear hubs, with the opposite end attached to the operating lever. So if it moved far enough beyond the range of the hydraulic cylinder, then the cables would become operative. Or even have two separate hand levers in some cases. 99% of the time though, the hydraulics would be the operative system.
 
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You must forgive me for being a pedantic b*****d Flintstone, but it is bad form to toast Her Majesty as the Duke of Lancaster, anywhere except in the county itself.

At formal dinners, when we used to toast “The Queen” our resident Lancastrian would add “The Duke of Lancaster” to be followed by the rest of us bellowing “ shut up Harold”. It happened so often, it became a tradition. Very sadly the said Harold died quite recently.

ps According to Debretts, which you will understand that I spend all my spare time studying 😉, The DoL toast may be given elsewhere in the country but only at Lancastrian events...😴😵😴😵
That’s fine, I can do pedantic! Although I read a section Debrett’s every night, I haven't reached that part yet.... ;)

I only do the toasting thing in Yorkshire because it winds up Native Yorkshiremen no end :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: There are two Lancastrians in the room at most of the formal dinners I regularly attend (pre-Covid that is). The locals usually try to keep us apart, for fear we might form a militia if we got close for too long....:rolleyes:
 

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That’s the biggest thing I don't like about e-brakes. They are mostly either 100% ON or 100% OFF. Very little opportunity to finesse how much degree of on or off. Then they are generally way too slow operating to be usable for actions like swinging the rear end wide to tighten the car’s line through a hairpin bend. Fine for use as a parking brake as they are intended though.
Even with a normal mechanical handbrake there are other problems in trying to use it for its 'on-the-move' purpose. You have to switch off ESP as otherwise the car tries to control the slide and it does everything bar tighten the line. Disabling ABS gets round that but you can't do that on your normal road car when you fancy some fun on a deserted Alpine road. On a Haldex equipped car, where that unit is engaged, operating the handbrake does not disengage the Haldex unit so the handbrake turn becomes more of a handbrake stop. :)

Year ago I did learn a way of doing a sort of handbrake turn in a Land Rover with its transmission mounted handbrake on the rear end of the gearbox. It was useful only in muddy conditions in trials competitions.
 
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All these mentions of preselect take me back learned to drive in these. 5 speed preselect 5 forward or 5 reverse just slammed a lever over reversed the transfer box. The gear change pedal (GCP) replaced the clutch one booted it not pushed in for changes had to be Pumped 10 times in each selection each morning
4586
 

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The steepest hill on my travels was on holiday in Clovelly. The cobbled road down to the beach had a donkey ride for those that couldn't make it. At the risk of killing this thread, the Hovis advert was on another west country cobbled road.
 

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And the steepest street in the world is:


The street's steepness was unintentional. As with many other parts of early Dunedin, and indeed New Zealand, streets were laid out in a grid pattern with no consideration for the terrain, usually by planners in London !

Never driven it but there is an annual 'race' down the hill using 30,000 Jaffas ( a hard sugar coated spherical sweet)
 

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We were on holiday in Dunedin, New Zealand, in an automatic Mercedes SprInter camper van when we heard this on the radio. So of course, my son had to find this street and drive all the way to the top. It is quite steep, and we got a cheer from the pedestrians walking up when we were on our way back down again. The Sprinter had no problem at all either up or down.
 

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I expect Jimmy will be able to confirm this - the road up from the harbour area at Robin Hood's Bay, back up towards the car park and Victoria Hotel is pretty darned steep. To the extent the pedestrian footpath alongside is not a path at all, but a set of rather steep steps in their own right. Think of a steepish staircase would more apt.

There is no parking at the harbour slipway itself. And is a dead-end with minimal turning space. So the road is only used for deliveries or disabled access. NOT recommended for casual traffic. Better to use the car park and negotiate the steps on foot. Bring your crampons for the return ascent if icy though! :ROFLMAO:
 
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Yes we stopped for fish and chips on the way back up last time to break the climb!
 
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I expect Jimmy will be able to confirm this - the road up from the harbour area at Robin Hood's Bay, back up towards the car park and Victoria Hotel is pretty darned steep.
Bay Bank in RHB is about 1 in 3 or 30% in newspeak. When we visited about 10 years ago, Mrs J was stuck at the bottom, so I had to get the car and rescue her. My ambition is to ride up it at speed on my e-bike!
Here are ten more steep hills for cyclists to tackle. I've been up Carlton Bank in the car and the views are stunning.
roadcyclinguk.com/sportive/ten-more-uks-steepest-climbs.html
 
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I've driven a few of those.
 

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Hmm it's not going up hill that's the problem, it's coming down the other side as the gearbox won't change up unless i'm on the accelerator peddle. So on very steep hills i have to use the manual gearbox, change it up to seventh and use the brake. Am i missing something?
 

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Hmm it's not going up hill that's the problem, it's coming down the other side as the gearbox won't change up unless i'm on the accelerator peddle. So on very steep hills i have to use the manual gearbox, change it up to seventh and use the brake. Am i missing something?
Yes, you are definitely missing something!
Have you never heard of engine braking?
You don't go UP a gear, you go DOWN!
 

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Discussion Starter #37 (Edited)
Returning to my original question, there was an article in our local paper a few days ago about a lady who became stranded on Hard Knott Pass in her Yeti, and the breakdown service apparently refused to attend - was this perhaps anybody from on here?
 

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Dare I mention the three, parallel test hills at the Longcross military test track, just off the M3 near Chobham in Surrey? Now owned by QuinetiQ and used regularly by film and TV studios for stunt shots of car chases and the like.

The three hills were/are 1in3, 1in2, and 1in1. Never been brave enough to use the 1in1 (military tracked vehicles only, the sign said). Been up and down the 1in2 numerous times in a variety of high performance cars though. Including several in a Metro 6R4 (Mid-engine, V6, 2.8-litre, 4WD for those not familiar). The reminder to the driver when going UP was "brake before crest". As there was a 90-degree right hand corner immediately over the crest! Going down it was "DO NOT brake". Unless you wanted to retire from the event with the car rolled end over end into a barely recognisable ball at the foot of the hill. (Saw that happen once to a car we had almost caught and were about to overtake where the track got wider, when it levelled out. Brake lights came on half way down the hill. By the bottom the rear of the car was in the air and about to overtake the front end. We passed as it disappeared into vegetation, off to the left as the track levelled out.)

Crew walked away, shaken but not stirred. We were chatting to them afterwards in the service area, after the remains of their car had been recovered back there and hoisted onto its trailer to go home. We thanked them for "pulling over" to let us by, but mentioned they needn't have made it quite so spectacular really. Dark humour in the rally world? The driver's response was: "I'm trying to figure out how many cans of T-cut I'll need to polish out that lot?" (There wasn't a straight panel on the car, as it had barrel rolled after going end-over into the undergrowth.)

Fortunately, by that stage in my career I was usually with drivers who didn't have to be reminded when NOT to brake. Including one who once asked - "What is the middle pedal for anyway, I've never used it?". (Actually he DID know when to use it, and when he did, in the 6R4, you could feel your eyeballs trying to pop out of their sockets, on dry tarmac.)
 

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Never been to Longcross, but one of the sites we used to use with LR for training had a 1:1 hill. Only very short but it was "fun" teaching people how to drive down it!
Stop right at the top so the front wheels were balanced on the edge, turn engine off, engage first gear LOW box, take both feet completely away from the pedals and then start the engine. The initial lurch of the starter was enough to take you over the edge and then the engine braking took over, and you very gently rolled to the bottom.

Funnily enough women were far better at doing it than many men, but they did scream more!!
 
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I've done a few 1 in 1 hills in LR trials competitions. All on rough/loose ground which makes things interesting, especially if you fail on the ascent and then need to reverse down under control.

After coming to a wheel-spinning halt, the technique was to hold the vehicle on the footbrake and switch off the engine. Clutch pedal down, engage reverse and clutch pedal up. Take foot off brake pedal and the LR should be held against the engine. All feet off all pedals and, keeping the steering straight, start the engine. Now you descend gracefully and safely.

Descending a long steep hill with low grip is interesting too. While low box and idle speed turns the wheels at a set speed, gravity can overcome grip and turn the vehicle into a toboggan with no steering. Beware steep, wet grass - otherwise know as green ice.
 
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