Yeti Owners Club banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi - Ahead of a trip to my local Skoda dealership, I wonder if anyone has experienced the kind of noise we are hearing from my wifes 2lt diesel Outdoor yeti brakes.
Purchased new in 2015 she has just completed 16500 miles, as you would expect all is as new and running without any problems. However, today I drove it and upon braking it sounds as though the ABS is kicking in, although perhaps not quite as loud.
I removed both front wheels which showed minimal wear to the pads and smooth faced discs. I sprayed the disc between the pads and generally sprayed the calipers overall with brake cleaner hoping to perhaps dislodge any bits of grit it may have picked up. To be fair, little or nothing came out.
Having replaced everything, I ran it back up the road and sure enough although it braked as it should, it is still with the accompanying juddering sound (but not juddering motion) as with an activated ABS. Its purely sound only.
If anyone else has experienced this issue I'd really appreciate your input.
Many thanks, Boo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,032 Posts
My Yeti has exhibited a scraping or "brakes binding" sound since purchase. Dealer (not my favourite either Derek) says brakes are fine. No bad reports from services so I now give up and put it, like the "hesitant accelerating" down to Skoda quirkiness.
Sorry, but this doesn't help you Boo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
Same here rubbing noise from front since new October 2014 never any problems.
Unlucky with rears both picked up some material that scored both and a puncture about the same time.
No more Raiders road for me.
The car may be designated rough road design but it ain't proof against forestry debris. 😠
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Same here rubbing noise from front since new October 2014 never any problems.
Unlucky with rears both picked up some material that scored both and a puncture about the same time.
No more Raiders road for me.
The car may be designated rough road design but it ain't proof against forestry debris. 😠
Hi - Ahead of a trip to my local Skoda dealership, I wonder if anyone has experienced the kind of noise we are hearing from my wifes 2lt diesel Outdoor yeti brakes.
Purchased new in 2015 she has just completed 16500 miles, as you would expect all is as new and running without any problems. However, today I drove it and upon braking it sounds as though the ABS is kicking in, although perhaps not quite as loud.
I removed both front wheels which showed minimal wear to the pads and smooth faced discs. I sprayed the disc between the pads and generally sprayed the calipers overall with brake cleaner hoping to perhaps dislodge any bits of grit it may have picked up. To be fair, little or nothing came out.
Having replaced everything, I ran it back up the road and sure enough although it braked as it should, it is still with the accompanying juddering sound (but not juddering motion) as with an activated ABS. Its purely sound only.
If anyone else has experienced this issue I'd really appreciate your input.
Many thanks, Boo
Further to my earlier post, I have since taken out my wifes Yeti with a view to some hard braking in the vain hope some debris may become dislodged. Despite a 20 mile run the issue remains. I am more of a mind this is an ABS related issue simply because of the associated juddering noise emitted under braking which does indeed resemble an activated albeit, muffled ABS. It's fast looking like it requires the practised ear of a Skoda mechanic to identify the cause.
I'll be sure to post the results ....
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,077 Posts
The car may be designated rough road design but it ain't proof against forestry debris. 😠
Never had a problem with either of mine, and I probably drove hundreds of miles on forestry tracks.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,441 Posts
Never had a problem with either of mine, and I probably drove hundreds of miles on forestry tracks.
Although I’ve probably only covered a tiny fraction of the forestry mileage in our Yeti compared to mileages Graham did in his, I’ve never had any problem either.

Re-Reading the OP, Boo’s car has covered an exceptionally low mileage. One thing that upsets braking systems more than anything else is not being “used”. (I’m expecting braking system problems when I put my BMW back on the road within in the next month). The more and the harder you use the brakes, the healthier they stay, as a general rule.

I’m tempted to wonder if the noise may be hidden surface corrosion or build up of glaze on the disk faces? Or is there a sticking ABS valve in the distribution unit? Does it tend to go away after a longer journey? Say over 50 miles each way? Or if you give the brakes a good hard workout over several applications, to get everything good and hot? Such as take it up to 60+mph then brake down to 5mph several times, on an empty road or track obviously. To give the system a bit more exercise. Does the noise go away after that?

Edit: also just re-read #4 about taking it for some exercise. So perhaps my theory about ABS valves is more valid than disk glaze?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
14,212 Posts
Modern fuel efficient tyres are not very robust and have very thin sidewalls, if you are unlucky it does not take much to damage them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,005 Posts
I’m tempted to wonder if the noise may be hidden surface corrosion or build up of glaze on the disk faces? Or is there a sticking ABS valve in the distribution unit? Does it tend to go away after a longer journey? Say over 50 miles each way? Or if you give the brakes a good hard workout over several applications, to get everything good and hot? Such as take it up to 60+mph then brake down to 5mph several times, on an empty road or track obviously. To give the system a bit more exercise. Does the noise go away after that?
Disc glaze or surface corrosion was my first thought but that doesn't explain the juddering noise with no juddering feeling. I was thinking along the lines of pad transfer to the disc giving the feeling of a warped disc that's not really warped. In that case a mechanical clean up of the disc and pad faces with emery cloth might help.

If ABS was somehow activated without pressing the pedal hard or fast enough, that would usually be felt through the brake pedal but the OP does not report that. Sticking valve in the ABS unit? Rapid on/off of the ABS pump? All just guess work at the moment.

The Skoda mechanic may be able to help and getting hands on with the car is obviously much better than remote diagnosis by forum. A scan for fault codes is the first step for guidance on so many problems on modern cars and this must be one of the first actions.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Flintstone

·
Registered
Joined
·
228 Posts
I'm intrigued by what could cause an ABS type noise without the feel, it would be interesting to know if the frequency was similar to ABS pulsing or lower.

Scabbed up disks can certainly give a good repeating noise until they are clean, but all reported as clean...

The only really odd Yeti brake noise I had was with a stowaway bit of gravel in the bell of the brake disk :) (Link --> Saturday jobs )


My next test would be to get someone else to drive the car and run through the braking cycle to cause the noise, while I listened from each seat and then from either side of the car as it passed. Hopefully to get a direction for the noise and see if it was from a particular corner or the engine bay etc...

With access to a pet garage, it would be good to see if it happens when up on the lift so everything is unloaded and also on some brake test rollers.

Keep us posted !

Spag
 
  • Like
Reactions: Flintstone

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Hello All - Many thanks for your very valued input. As previously mentioned here and also by a friend this morning, I concur with the suspicions of those who point to 'little used brakes' When I asked my wife how long the brakes had been making this noise she replied since a driver in front of her who stopped suddenly about five days previously. This in turn led her to braking severely. I now wonder did the brakes pistons extend to a point they rarely reach and have become 'stuck' so to speak and not fully returned home - Is that possible?
Her commute to our local hospital is an 18 mile round trip on average three or four times a week. That journey would result in her braking little more than half a dozen times between our home and the hospital carpark. It is a rural commute with only one set of traffic lights as she nears work. With hindsight, it would probably be beneficial to thrash the car once or twice a week to wake it up!
Again, this evening, I intend taking her car out to drive and brake harshly with the intention of getting some heat into the calipers and hopefully loosening up the brakes pistons. Failing that, then attention to all four wheels/brakes with a view to loosening up the brakes pistons appears to be my next step.
Watch this space ....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Yet again, Hi - Well 50 minutes of throttling the Yeti up n' down a quiet A689 and braking at times to a full standstill, I have recently pulled onto my drive and could 'hear' how hot I had got the brakes. They were almost singing :p
I would estimate 30 minutes of harsh breaking saw a noticabley diminished sound to the described issue then another 20 mins saw it as quiet as it used to be. Yes, the noise has left the Yeti! No doubt about it, the brakes simply need putting to work occasionally.

Sincere thanks to those of you who took the time to comment with your positive input. You are an invaluable source of information from the complex to the simplest of enquiries. Your very much appreciated (y)
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
4,884 Posts
Glad it seems sorted. Anytime you have queries just ask.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,441 Posts
With hindsight, it would probably be beneficial to thrash the car once or twice a week to wake it up!
In the trade that’s called an “Italian Tune-up”. Drive it like an Italian once in a while, and the car will benefit / love you for it. Or “drive it like you stole it”, is another expression for the same thing. Cures all sorts of maladies brought on by pussyfooting around all the time. Once a fortnight is probably more than adequate though. (Unless you’re enjoying the boy-racer style? :) )

I have recently pulled onto my drive and could 'hear' how hot I had got the brakes. They were almost singing :p
Yes, the noise has left the Yeti! No doubt about it, the brakes simply need putting to work occasionally.
Excellent news! Thanks for letting us know. Great feedback.

Just one word of caution. When you’ve been “using” the brakes properly like that for a few miles, give them the last couple of miles, or last two minutes of the drive, pussyfooting again. To let them cool down evenly while the rotors are still turning at a moderate speed. Coming to a halt with red hot discs and pads, then leaving them like that, can lead to uneven cooling and the discs getting warped. Or even pads sticking to the discs. Especially the rears if left with the parking brake applied. Better to give them a chance to cool before parking up.

Exactly the same applies to the turbo. Take it easy the last mile or so of the journey to let the bearings cool. They’ll last a great deal longer, and it avoids the oil that is left in the bearings getting cooked. Some high performance cars even have gadgets that keep the oil circulating for two minutes after you’ve switched off, for the same reason. Farm tractors have (or certainly used to have) driving guidelines that recommended letting the engine idle for two minutes before shut down at the end of a day. For the same reason. The big Case I use to drive in Canada had a sticker on the screen that said let the exhaust gas temperature fall below 200 degrees before shutting off the engine. In heavy draught field work, like chisel ploughing, it would run around 5-600 degrees for hours on end during “work”. With the turbo boost up toward the top end of its green zone. That’s a similar temperature that the Yeti’s exhaust gets to during a DPF regen.
 
  • Like
Reactions: bryetian

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
In the trade that’s called an “Italian Tune-up”. Drive it like an Italian once in a while, and the car will benefit / love you for it. Or “drive it like you stole it”, is another expression for the same thing. Cures all sorts of maladies brought on by pussyfooting around all the time. Once a fortnight is probably more than adequate though. (Unless you’re enjoying the boy-racer style? :) )


Excellent news! Thanks for letting us know. Great feedback.

Just one word of caution. When you’ve been “using” the brakes properly like that for a few miles, give them the last couple of miles, or last two minutes of the drive, pussyfooting again. To let them cool down evenly while the rotors are still turning at a moderate speed. Coming to a halt with red hot discs and pads, then leaving them like that, can lead to uneven cooling and the discs getting warped. Or even pads sticking to the discs. Especially the rears if left with the parking brake applied. Better to give them a chance to cool before parking up.

Exactly the same applies to the turbo. Take it easy the last mile or so of the journey to let the bearings cool. They’ll last a great deal longer, and it avoids the oil that is left in the bearings getting cooked. Some high performance cars even have gadgets that keep the oil circulating for two minutes after you’ve switched off, for the same reason. Farm tractors have (or certainly used to have) driving guidelines that recommended letting the engine idle for two minutes before shut down at the end of a day. For the same reason. The big Case I use to drive in Canada had a sticker on the screen that said let the exhaust gas temperature fall below 200 degrees before shutting off the engine. In heavy draught field work, like chisel ploughing, it would run around 5-600 degrees for hours on end during “work”. With the turbo boost up toward the top end of its green zone. That’s a similar temperature that the Yeti’s exhaust gets to during a DPF regen.
Excellent advice Flintstone - On similar lines, company procedure advocated a cooling down period for our pedestal mounted offshore cranes. It was understood two minutes afforded the oil to disipate the heat generated in the turbos bearings as well retain lubrication.

Incidentally, the Yeti's brakes continues to run silently (unlike its driver) 😅
 
  • Like
Reactions: Flintstone
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top