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Discussion Starter #1
One month with a Yeti.
I thought it may be interesting to compare and contrast the ownership experiences. So for me the first month has been a journey of mixed emotions. Coming from a range of German marques, the Skoda has been a little less finished in places, although the paint finish itself is fantastic on my Rosso red; little things like the dirt gets in the door rebates and shut lines, and more exposed fixings for trim show its roots. Certainly noise levels are higher at all speeds but this is a car that is 30% lower cost than the comparison vehicles and it is by no means a Czech tractor. It is smooth and quiet enough to relax to all but the quietest classical music, aided by the radio subtly increasing the volume with speed, though I still can't figure why it gets a notch louder when I turn the engine off?

The controls are smooth and light, traveling distance is no chore and I still can't quite get my head around the steering clipping corners when I expect to be fighting understeer, it really has an unexpected cornering prowess for an SUV and the firmer suspension, still soft after an Audi, really means it is agile on B roads. In confined space it is exceptionally manoeuvrable, always being shorter than you expect and a turning circle of a sixpence.

Below 60mph the fuel economy can be excellent indicating 50 sometimes (2400 miles done) above 66mph (indicated 70) or after some spirited driving (solely for the purpose of bedding the engine in, of course) 43.7 mpg (a real 41mpg) is more likely over a tank of fuel but hopefully I will see 2-3 mpg improvement by 10k. With 170hp economy is bound to be compromised under full throttle, there has to be a price to pay for the excellent traffic clearing performance when needed.

Ahh, yes of course backing up a steep hill to let some less adept person pass on the back roads means no spinning, stalling, or revving; hill hold and 4x4 do the business. I now seek out the direct routes with steeper hills and grass in the middle of the road, no risk of grounding out or chipped rims now, the Yeti eats it up. One day the mirrors would not fold or the drivers window close on the key fob control but it sorted itself out, how odd is that?

Loads of storage and space for people or stuff in the back even without taking the seats out. I haven't found a need to turn it in to a van yet, but surely will, we are quite short perhaps we could turn it into a camper, just a thought?

Just waiting for some more traditional summer weather so I can experience more 4 x 4 virtues!
 

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Hi Ferdie. did you have the "off road button". if not you will miss a bit of magic with this button when in the bad stuff or one ice you can move when other 4x4s are stuck. as to the steering yes we did the same clipping corners. we are in Evanton Inverness at the moment going to Loch Ness today and Ben Nevis tomorrow. Skoda seem to ha e found a good working design and I hope they dont change out of recognition like some other marks. and dont ask about that add on tele.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You are defiantly in Yeti country. I have investigated hill descent on Tarmac, will be interesting to see it working on looser surfaces. Need to find a bit of green lane to check out "off road", so I still have some more features to evaluate. Don't have nav/tele on mine (if that's what you mean). Probably, would not use it from previous experience, but radio is good, does have tendency to jump stations is only problem, may be the TP feature? But what about the steering Xeons on the back roads,highly impressed.

I agree it is one of the few distinctive designs out there, packed with practicality lets hope styling 'improvements' don't loosethat. I think the people who love them value the function over style approach.

Enjoy the mountains, if not the torrential rain (I can see how a tele could come in handy).
 

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Hi Ferdie. the rain is here for the day I think. when we went to the Fat Lamb for "group on" weekend we plotted a route up on them there mountains (bleak moor really) and it had been snowing a few days having froze but yeti took it in her stride. a photo would round the day off so out I got and fell flat on my back trying to get to my feet seemed impossible until I got on "scrub" and that told me the ORBut worked brilliantly obviously speed is not a thing to contemplate just let the car do its job.
you see the ploughed fields with the stubble? yeti will be at home on it no matter how much rain.
I will get bogged down sometime but not looking to on purpose.bring on the bad weather.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Sounds like you are a confident off the road explorer so it is good to know a bit of slippery stubble is no obstacle to a Yeti. We will be going to the local show grounds tomorrow, after the thunderstorm tonight, expect it to be muddy and slippery so fingers crossed I get to see themountainbeast in action!
 

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Last year I was parked in a field that was being used as a car park. A coach had become stuck up to its axles in the mud, a breakdown truck was sent to rescue it but also became stuck. When we left without any problems at all, a rangers 4x4 was trying to rescue the rescue truck.
As long as you are sensible and remember you are on road tyres the Yeti is very sure footed
 
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