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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I currently run an old Honda Jazz, which with the magic rear seats it has been great, but I am thinking of changing and I quite fancy a Yeti. Budget is up to £7000, and I had a few questions!

Firstly, I think I want either the 1.2 or 1.4, is either one better than the other? Does it feel underpower with the 1.2? 1.8 would be lovely, but I want to keep it cheap, then hopefully I can afford to run something fun alongside it in the future. Not interested in a Diesel.

I believe the 1.4 can come as either 2wd or 4wd? I don't need 4wd, but is there a configeration that gives a better drive? I have read that the Yeti chassis is one of the best in the VAG group, and I like a fun car to drive.

I'm interested in the load space, in the Jazz, the rear seats fold flat, and I can fit my bike in, front wheel off, laying flat. Is the yeti boot big enough to do this? I know the rear seats are removable, which appeals, but I don't want to have to take them out every time I want to sling the bike in the back! Doing some research, I see you can get a variable boot floor, would I need this to get a flat load space, and is this able to be retro fitted? With the rear seats down or removed, can you recline the passenger seat flat to enable long loads to fit in? Is this picture with the variofloor?
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Regarding the infotainment, I currently have a relatively new Android Auto double DIN head unit that I would like to swap over. Is this easy without losing functionality with other things, eg clocks, mpg readouts etc. I assume you can get kits to keep the steering wheel controls, like the Connects 2 kits.

Sorry for all the questions, hoping to start looking soon and want to know what I'm looking for.

Thanks very much.
 

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Welcome to the forum.

I'll try an answer some of those questions but hopefully others will chip in their opinions as well.

TSi engine in 1.2 or 1.4 are turbo charged so power is more than it seems and more equivalent to a 1.8 litre normally aspirated engine. Going from the Jazz you won't think these
these engines are underpowered. The 1.4 is a rarer beast so you are much more likely to find a 1.2TSi and it will be 2 wheel drive. The 1.4 4X4 were higher spec later models and therefore likely to be outside your budget given the rise in used car prices over recent months.

The early model 1.2 has a cam chain but this was replaced in 2015 by a cam belt 16 valve version. Listen out for any signs of chain rattle.

The 4X4 has extra weight and more things to go need service (Haldex) but gives improved grip in slippery conditions (with the right tyres). Whether you need it is a matter of where you may be driving and normal tarmac/gravel roads are fine on 2X4 as Yeti has a bit more ground clearance than a normal car. Petrol 4X4s are hard to find and avoid the 1.8.

Rear seats are flexible in that they fold up, back rests fold forward or can be removed altogether. Whn the back rests are folded forward the seats are not entirely flat eeven with a raised floor. The raised floor comes when there is a spare wheel fitted and this can be bought separately if you find a Yeti without. We have many members who carry bikes internally and I'm sure someone will post a photo or two to show the configuration but I would expect you to have no issues with this.

Front passenger seat tipping forward was an optional extra and not found on many.

Infotainment system should swap but you may need an adaptor to connect the VW system wiring but I believe these are available. Maybe if you give more detail of the unit you want to swap someone can give a more informed bit of advice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Thanks for the reply! With my budget looks like I'll be looking at the earlier 1.2, are there any specific things to watch out for on these, apart from the chain rattle? I'm not bothered about four wheel drive, just wondered if it improved the drive or not?
Regarding the front seats, on the Jazz, with the rear seats flat, I can recline the front seat backwards so it is horizontal, which then means I can fit long things in easily, I've even had a full size front door in it this way! Does the Yeti seat recline this way?
 

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You can recline the front seat backwards by winding the relining knob but not sure it goes entirely flat.

An old thread but worth a read for some general background on what to look for in a second-hand Yeti.
 

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Yeti Outdoor 2017 SEL TDi150 4x4 Manual
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Pics of 3, regular adult sized, bikes stowed vertically in the back of my Yeti. With just the left and centre rear seats removed. With the centre rear seat in place, two bikes fit easily. I just pop the front wheel off each bike with quick release hub bolts. Then store those alongside the door - as in the second pic. I secure the bike's front handlebars to the Yeti's front seat head rest supports.
Car Vehicle Motor vehicle Tire Wheel

Tire Wheel Vehicle Bicycle Car


Beneath the green tarp is a raised floor, covering a spare wheel kit. When the rear seats are folded flat, that gives a load area with only a small step from the false floor to the folded seats.

I'm sure with all three back seats in place but folded flat, it would be possible to lay a single bike horizontal with the front wheel in place, but have never tried.

A further combination allows the rear seats to "tumble" forward, short of removing each of them altogether. So they fold close up against the back of the front seats. That may give you a suitable well for handlebars, where the seat bases normally sit. On a car without the raised false floor in the boot area, that also leaves you a flat floor from the rear door sill to the back of the folded seats.

The car pictured does have the option that SnowGood mentioned on the front seat. Where the back of the front passenger seat could be wound forward to lie flat on top of the base, using the seat back angle adjustment. Not sure, but I suspect it may have been part of the pack that also included height adjustment for the front passenger seat?
 
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When the rear seats backs are laid down the 2 outer seats do not have load bearing backs.
 

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1) I'm not bothered about four wheel drive, just wondered if it improved the drive or not?
.... I like a fun car to drive.

2) Regarding the front seats, on the Jazz, with the rear seats flat, I can recline the front seat backwards so it is horizontal, which then means I can fit long things in easily, I've even had a full size front door in it this way! Does the Yeti seat recline this way?
1) The extra weight of the 4WD transmission does give you a slightly less harsh ride, especially as experienced in the rear seats. Having owned both a 2WD and a 4WD now, I would say the extra low down weight does lower the overall CofG slightly. With a slight improvement in handling and roll resistance. I doubt if typical drivers would explore the envelope far enough to notice this, but if you "like a fun car to drive" you may detect the difference? 2WD Yetis are still very positive compared to 99% of others though.

One of the distinct advantages of a Yeti over its rivals is that the ride and handling are surprisingly "sprightly" for a SUV style vehicle with plenty of ground clearance. Either 2WD or 4WD. Very little body roll when cornering moderately hard for example. This suits the great majority of owners, although one or two find the ride quite harsh? Depends what you are used to and/or prefer. If you've been used to the magic carpet softness of a hydraulically suspended Citroen DS, CX or Xantia for example, then stepping into a Yeti you would find the Yeti suspension quite firm. By contrast, transferring from my BMW 330d with the lowered Msport suspension pack, to the Yeti, I used to find: "This is quite good - not far off the Beemer's firm and communicative ride.". Not quite as "sporting", but firm enough to remain enjoyable and confidence inspiring enough to explore the envelope a little. (More below).

Tyres make a big difference to the ride. Most higher trim level Yetis also came with 17" wheels and lower profile tyres. Whereas lower spec and the 1.6TDi "Greenline" versions had 16" wheels with taller, 60% aspect ratio tyres. The latter give a noticeably less harsh ride over things likes cat-eyes for example, without affecting handling or cornering grip to any detectable degree. The 17" and 16" wheel and tyre sizes are interchangeable, as they both give near identical overall diameter and rolling circumference. Indeed several owners in here, such as The Hood and myself, regularly swap between winter tyres on 16" wheels and summer tyres on 17".

The only area I've ever really found the Yeti's handling slightly concerning is one that only a few drivers would ever notice. If you get the car slightly airborne over humps or crests in the road (plenty of those round where I live, on the moorland roads especially). Or anywhere where the suspension achieves full "droop". Then when you come back down to earth, the damping doesn't quite know whether to be soft or hard, so gets ever so slightly nonplussed momentarily. Before quickly settling itself and recovering its composure. As said, not many folk on "normal" roads would ever encounter this though. I'm also used to the very firm ride and handling of the MSport equipped BMW and rally cars with fully "sorted" tarmac suspension that most people would consider "rock hard". When those get properly airborne, they land flat, settle immediately and just carry on under full power: Like this one I was co-driving when this photo was taken:
Wheel Tire Vehicle Land vehicle Car


2) Back to the seat configurations. The front passenger seat - IF the right options are fitted - doesn't fold back to lie level with the rears, like say a Renault 16 or Austin Maxi did. But winds forward, so the backrest lies on the base, rather like folding the rear seat backs down. That leaves the passenger seat below the level of the dashboard. As an example - I've had a full-height grandfather clock in the back of the Yeti. Its top resting on the dashboard, suitably padded to avoid damage. Its foot against the rear hatch sill, again with suitable padding. That was significantly taller than a standard house door, although not so wide.

Again - remember one of the Yetis hidden strengths is adequate interior height. I suspect you might find a house door may fit vertically, between front passenger seat and B-pillar? I've had all sorts in the back of the Yeti, but not so far a house door. :)
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
That's great, thanks for taking the time write such a detailed post:) A firm ride doesn't bother me, up until a couple of years ago I had a VX220, so well used to a firm ride, and the Jazz apparently has a firm ride, although I've always found it to be fine. I'll find some cars for sale locally and go and have a poke around.
 

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I currently run an old Honda Jazz, which with the magic rear seats it has been great, but I am thinking of changing and I quite fancy a Yeti. Budget is up to £7000, and I had a few questions!

Firstly, I think I want either the 1.2 or 1.4, is either one better than the other? Does it feel underpower with the 1.2? 1.8 would be lovely, but I want to keep it cheap, then hopefully I can afford to run something fun alongside it in the future. Not interested in a Diesel.

I believe the 1.4 can come as either 2wd or 4wd? I don't need 4wd, but is there a configeration that gives a better drive? I have read that the Yeti chassis is one of the best in the VAG group, and I like a fun car to drive.

I'm interested in the load space, in the Jazz, the rear seats fold flat, and I can fit my bike in, front wheel off, laying flat. Is the yeti boot big enough to do this? I know the rear seats are removable, which appeals, but I don't want to have to take them out every time I want to sling the bike in the back! Doing some research, I see you can get a variable boot floor, would I need this to get a flat load space, and is this able to be retro fitted? With the rear seats down or removed, can you recline the passenger seat flat to enable long loads to fit in? Is this picture with the variofloor?
View attachment 7123

Regarding the infotainment, I currently have a relatively new Android Auto double DIN head unit that I would like to swap over. Is this easy without losing functionality with other things, eg clocks, mpg readouts etc. I assume you can get kits to keep the steering wheel controls, like the Connects 2 kits.

Sorry for all the questions, hoping to start looking soon and want to know what I'm looking for.

Thanks very much.
For what its worth, I bought 2015 1•2 , and I am delighted with it. Watchout if sunroof fitted, mine leaked like a sieve, but was sorted by the dealer. My previous car was a BMW 320 estate, the Yeti knocks it into a cocked hat. Mine has cam chain and had no probs. Highly recommended
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Engines with chains appeal more to me, so at least you don't have the replacement cost every 5 years.
 

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Engines with chains appeal more to me, so at least you don't have the replacement cost every 5 years.
A good chain quality and efficient tensioner is a great idea,and should last the life of the engine.However the 1.2tsi from VW is not one of those.It was improved in late 2011,but still stretching occurred and rarely got to 60,000 miles without the start up rattle.
Hence VW buried this engine completely in 2015,and reverted to a belt design.
 

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Yeti Outdoor 2017 SEL TDi150 4x4 Manual
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Is a chain change expensive, do you know?
See page 4 of this contemporary thread....

To follow updates from different forum categories at the same time, just click on the "NEW" circle, at top right of the page, just left of your avatar pic (of the blue VX220!)
 

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Pics of 3, regular adult sized, bikes stowed vertically in the back of my Yeti...
That's interesting, I had assumed it would be impossible to pop a bike inside. I'm going to have to try popping my XXL Specialized Stumpjumper in there now. It may not be less hassle that popping the bike carrier on the back, but there are times when it would be useful carry it inside.

For the original poster, we have a 1.8TSI 4x4. It is brilliant fun. Apart from this current 4WD issue and a slightly high oil consumption, it is a superb car. If you like an exciting drive I would go for the 1.8TSI 4x4. I have a towbar bike carrier which I use on our campervan and the car for bikes and we keep the genuine Yeti roof bars up top (yes, bit of noise on the motorway) with some luggage straps in the boot for bringing long things home for our house project. I am 6' 5", the head room is amazing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I've got a towbar and a bike rack to fit for the Jazz, but as most of the time I'm only carrying one bike, it's much less hassle to drop the rear seats, take off the front wheel, and selling it in the back.
On the RIDC website (really handy for measurements), the internal length with the seats folded is virtually the same in the Jazz and Yeti, which surprises me, but I wonder if they have measured with the Yeti rear seats folded up, rather than down.
 
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