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2016 Laurin & Klement Yeti 2.0 TDI 4x4
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I can’t see why anyone would call the Yeti chassis one of the best on the VAG group, I find them twitchy at the back on less than smooth roads when pressing on. The back feels to skip out.
 

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2015 Elegance Greenline II
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I can’t see why anyone would call the Yeti chassis one of the best on the VAG group, I find them twitchy at the back on less than smooth roads when pressing on. The back feels to skip out.
Then there is something wrong with setup of suspension or tyres on yours.
 

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I can’t see why anyone would call the Yeti chassis one of the best on the VAG group, I find them twitchy at the back on less than smooth roads when pressing on. The back feels to skip out.
That suggests that there is something very wrong with your car, I drove nearly 200k miles in my two and never found that.
I wonder what tyres you have fitted.
 
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Yeti 2017 2.0TDi 4x4 L&K DSG
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I think the Yeti has one of the best and most reliable platforms that Skoda have done but not sure about the best "Chassis"
The Mk1 Superb was on the VAG PL45 platform same as the Audi A4/S4 and that drove "Superb". I'd even say the Mk2 Superb on the VW PQ46 platform same as the Passat B6 was a more composed chassis.

The Mk2 Octavia in theory has the same platform, wheelbase, suspension type but doesn't feel as composed as Yeti due to the overhangs.

I've not driven an MQB platform car that drives anything but bland.
 

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2016 Laurin & Klement Yeti 2.0 TDI 4x4
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That suggests that there is something very wrong with your car, I drove nearly 200k miles in my two and never found that.
I wonder what tyres you have fitted.
Nothing wrong whatsoever I’ve had 2 Yetis both the same. The relatively short wheel base does make the car a good handling car. My mate worked for Skoda and he had a few people commented about the same thing.
Over a bumpy road into a bend the back feels a tad loose.
Quite how a Yeti can be compared to a GTI Golf or an RS4 both in the VAG range I’ll never know 🤣
 

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Nothing wrong whatsoever I’ve had 2 Yetis both the same. The relatively short wheel base does make the car a good handling car. My mate worked for Skoda and he had a few people commented about the same thing.
Over a bumpy road into a bend the back feels a tad loose.
Quite how a Yeti can be compared to a GTI Golf or an RS4 both in the VAG range I’ll never know 🤣
Sorry, but I don't believe a word of it.
I never found that to be a problem and I almost permanently drove on poorly surfaced roads around Mid Wales. Funny how in the 12 odd years I have been involved with Yeti's the most common comment is just how damned well the car handled, even by people I know who work for Skoda.

I fail to see why you have mentioned the Golf GTi or the RS4. I have never mentioned either. Seems a bit "clutching at straws"!

And I note you have conveniently ignored answering what tyres you have fitted!
 

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2016 Laurin & Klement Yeti 2.0 TDI 4x4
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Cross climate
The original post mentioned “Yeti chassis one of the best in VAG group” the same group a GTI & RS4 belong to so I’m within my rights to mention them. I certainly didn’t mention any of your comments in my post when I replied nor did I say it was a problem. All I said was the back can skip on bumpy bends.
 

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And some of us think you have got a problem with your car because your comment goes against what we have found and what other owners have reported over a long period.

And you might note that the original words used, as you state above, was ONE of the best, not the best. There is a big difference.
 
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Yeti Outdoor 2017 SEL TDi150 4x4 Manual
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I find them twitchy at the back on less than smooth roads when pressing on. The back feels to skip out.
Some of us also quite like a touch of oversteer. Helps cornering when you know what to expect and how to handle it. Speaking as someone who used to enjoy my trio of three high performance RWD Ford Escorts from the late 1970s. (What Roger Clark said about the RWD Escort was correct - “So long as you are not using the rear window to look in the direction of travel, then you are still in control”. (y) ) Then more recently several consecutive RWD BMWs, all 6-cyl version’s. All of which could be steered with the right foot (with traction and stability controls switched off in the BMW cases). Plus the “Lift Off Oversteer” provided as standard by a Peugeot 205 and 206 or Rover 200 series.

Not that I’ve encountered the characteristics you say you dislike in either of the two Yetis I’ve owned. Nothing other than neutral handling, even on bumpy North Yorkshire moorland roads. Or when pushing quite hard through 7 miles of forest gravel roads in Dalby Forest last September. To reach a spectator marshalling point I was asked to move to, in order help out at, just a few minutes before the course opening car schedule. (I was told to get to the new location “ask quick as you like, to stay ahead of the first safety/course car”. So I did as told :).)

(Now I feel the need to take the 2017 Yeti to the Isle of Man. To see if I can get the rear to step out a bit on some of the known bumpy bends down stages like Druidale, Curraghs, West Baldwin, Injebrek, etc. That could be a target for autumn 2022?)

Is your Yeti 4x4 or 2WD? Does the extra rear end weight of either a spare wheel kit, or the rear diff and shafts keep the rear end more “planted”?
 
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Had a little extra time before work tonight, so took a very different route to work.
I did manage to get the back a little squirrelly, though the corner would be best described as "crest, keep left into 5 left" on a clear dry road with a bit of enthusiasm and a very clear view.
More "entertaining" was a floatiness upon coming down, reminiscent of Mk2 1.6 sport Escort on the roads near Chapel en le Frith circa 1986.
It is possible I'm getting a little old for this sort of behaviour now, as whilst within legal limits, my first thought afterwards wasn't "again", but "wouldn't want to explain that to SWMBO if I stuffed it."
 

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Yeti 2017 2.0TDi 4x4 L&K DSG
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Is your Yeti 4x4 or 2WD? Does the extra rear end weight of either a spare wheel kit, or the rear diff and shafts keep the rear end more “planted”?
Having owned two of each there is a big difference on how they handle. Especially when comparing a 1.2Tsi FWD to a 2.0TDi 4x4.

On the 4x4 there's around a quarter of a tonne difference, more weight at the back, more unsprung weight, different spring rates, different dampers (Thicker struts).

I prefer the more damped feeling on the 4x4 but our FWD Yeti's were more lively which did also mean more unsettled on poor surfaces.

I'll also add that our two FWD Yeti's were standard and our 4x4 Yeti's had spare wheel and towbar which add's to the rear weight.

In my opinion the Yeti is a good handling car for a compact SUV, one of the best cars Skoda has produced, but it's no Golf R or S5 (Owned both)
 
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What it really boils down to is you can make any car twitchy with enough "enthusiasm" but for normal driving it is not a problem. However, if the rear end is a regular problem, you have probably either bought the wrong car or need to slow down a bit.
 

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I can’t see why anyone would call the Yeti chassis one of the best on the VAG group, I find them twitchy at the back on less than smooth roads when pressing on. The back feels to skip out.
Perhaps what Adam was referring to in #1 was best handling in its class (Compact SUV / Crossover)? Compared to others of the many VAG entries in the category (Karoq, Tiguan, T-Roc, Ateca, Q3, etc.) Also compared to other brands, such as Kuga, Qashqai, et al. Comparing apples with apples, rather than with oranges (VR6) or limes (TT).

What it really boils down to is you can make any car twitchy with enough "enthusiasm".
I recall a 1.8 Marina would exhibit nothing else but understeer, sometimes terminal. Even when provoked. Whereas the 1.3 A-series engined versions - much more balanced. Same with a few Hillman Hunter 1750s I experienced as pool cars. Understeer dominated in every scenario.
Slightly more modern, my Xantia would only ever understeer, no matter how hard I tried to get the rear to step out. Same with the Picasso and Ren Scenic (LWB).
So many modern cars are set up to understeer. As that is deemed easier and safer for 80% of drivers to deal with. Which is what makes the majority of cars so bland.
 

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You could definitely "throttle steer" my 1.3 Marina saloon in the right (slippery) conditions, and I think the Coupe was even "better"
 

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You could definitely "throttle steer" my 1.3 Marina saloon in the right (slippery) conditions, and I think the Coupe was even "better"
My first car was a 1976 Marina Coupe 1.3, the Coupe was fitted with a Cooper S distributer, 12G940 cylinder head and a larger single SU carb than the standard 1.3.
Mine had a high output sports coil and high lift camshaft.
With cheapo 80's tyres the backend was very lively in the wet :oops:
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Had a very brief look at one today, managed to have a measure of the boot, and slightly disappointed that the load space isn't any longer than the Jazz. However, I think it's still top of the list, so will keep looking!
 

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Yeti 2017 2.0TDi 4x4 L&K DSG
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Don't forget the rear seats lift out if required, it also makes quite a difference if a spare wheel is fitted.
Yes agree, the spare is a big compromise.

Makes the bag hooks next to useless, the boot space is significantly reduced and when removing the rear seats you don't have a big flat floor.

I've had two without spare and two with spare, I prefer to have the spare but if boot space is a major requirement then I'd do without.
 
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